News Feed

Below is the rolling news feed from Zimmer and Peacock. Our news feed represents that Zimmer and Peacock is a fast moving active company with lots of well-directed activity.

Tue

16

Oct

2018

Meet us in San Jose in December

Zimmer and Peacock will be at BioMed Devices in San Jose on the 5 and 6 December 2018.

 

ZP is a leading contract developer and manufacturer of biosensors and medical diagnostics and so we are delighted to be exhibiting in San Jose for a second year running.


Fri

12

Oct

2018

Newsletter October 12

Welcome to this week's newsletter from Zimmer and Peacock. This newsletter is a mixture of news, stories and tech notes from Zimmer and Peacock. If you want to subscribe to our newsletter or have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock and our passion for biosensor technologies please don't hesitate to contact us.

ZP - integrates flex and biosensors

 

At ZP we are all about innovating and this photo is an example.

 

Here we have taken our flex circuit and made it work with our standard sensors.

ZP featured in AZO Sensors

 

ZP is one of the leading companies for performing tech transfer from Universities to the Market, so we were delighted to be featured on the AZO website.

Thu

11

Oct

2018

ZP - integrates flex and biosensors

At ZP we are all about innovating, and this photo is an example.

 

Here we have taken our flex circuit and made it work with our standard sensors.


Mon

08

Oct

2018

ZP featured in AZO Sensors

ZP is one of the leading companies for performing tech transfer from Universities to the Market, hence we were delighted to be featured on the AZO website.


Fri

05

Oct

2018

Newsletter October 5

Welcome to this week's newsletter from Zimmer and Peacock. This newsletter is a mixture of news, stories and tech notes from Zimmer and Peacock. If you want to subscribe to our newsletter or have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock and our passion for biosensor technologies please don't hesitate to contact us.

ZP - UV exclusion

 

At ZP we know that the more environmental parameters we control the more controlled the sensors and biosensors, that is why we are excluding UV light from critical parts of the sensor and biosensor fabrication process.

ZP looking for partners - pH microwell system

 

Zimmer and Peacock is a global leader in contract electrochemical sensor and biosensor development and manufacturing, and this has  generated an interest from our clients for ZP taking our capabilities in sensor manufacturing, hardware manufacturing and software design through to a system for measuring pH in  a microwell format.

 

In this note we describe the system we have been asked to develop and ask anyone interested in collaborating with us on this to contact us, we are specifically interested in scientists, engineers, etc who are interested in using such a system in their work and research.

Zimmer and Peacock at Sensors and Instrumentation Birmingham

 

Zimmer and Peacock were delighted to speak with everyone at Sensors and Instrumentation in Birmingham.

 

On our website we have put some quick links to who we are and some of the technologies we discussed.

Collecting the Exhaled Breath Condensate

 

Zimmer and Peacock have launched their G1 Exhaled Breath Collection Device for collecting exhaled breath condensate.

 

This is functionalized to only collect the exhaled breath condensate and is the fastest most efficient collector of breath condensate, with the user only having to perform normal tidal breathing.

 

Please don't hesitate to contact us to find out more.

Measuring sauces at the restaurant

 

Visit our website to see the latest demo of the ChillIpot - Scoville Meter from the ZP Chilli Group.

Thu

04

Oct

2018

ZP - UV exclusion

At ZP we know that the more environmental parameters we control the more controlled the sensors and biosensors, that is why we are excluding UV light from critical parts of the sensor and biosensor fabrication process.


Thu

04

Oct

2018

ZP looking for partners - pH microwell system

Zimmer and Peacock is a global leader in contract electrochemical sensor and biosensor development and manufacturing, and this has  generated an interest from our clients for ZP taking our capabilities in sensor manufacturing, hardware manufacturing and software design through to a system for measuring pH in  a microwell format.

 

In this note we describe the system we have been asked to develop and ask anyone interested in collaborating with us on this to contact us, we are specifically interested in scientists, engineers, etc who are interested in using such a system in their work and research.


What are we proposing to do?

At ZP we are proposing to take our electrochemical pH measuring capabilities and apply it to a microplate format.

What we are proposing to do is manufacture a 96 well plate with  a pH sensor in each well, in addition we will take our existing hardware for measuring pH and scale it so that rather than measuring one pH sensor we will  measure 96 pH sensors in parallel.


Software and the user experience.

At ZP we fully understand that the ease of use comes in part from the software so we want a user interface that is easy and intuitive. We will develop two screens:

  • Screen One - a first screen where the current pH in a well is shown and is colour coded to show whether the conditions are acidic, basic or alkali.
  • Screen Two - a second screen is accessed from Screen One and shows how the pH has changed as a function of time.

We understand that some clients will want ot have temperature control and temperature monitoring, we intend to have temperature monitoring built into the plate. The temperature control will be achieved by ZP designing  plate so that it can still be used within existing microplate temperature chambers.


ZP Partners

Zimmer and Peacock is looking for partners who are interested in being the first beta users, and getting early access to the technology. Please don't hesite to contact us if you have any questions regarding this programme.


Mon

01

Oct

2018

Zimmer and Peacock at Sensors and Instrumentation Birmingham

Zimmer and Peacock were delighted to speak with everyone at Sensors and Instrumentation in Birmingham.

 

Below we have put some quick links to who we are and some of the technologies we discussed.


Fri

28

Sep

2018

Collecting the Exhaled Breath Condensate

Zimmer and Peacock have launched their G1 Exhaled Breath Collection Device for collecting exhaled breath condensate.

 

The is functionalized to only collect the exhaled breath condensate, and is the fastest most efficient collector of breath condensate, with the user only having to perform normal tidal breathing.

 

Please don't hesitate to contact us to find out more.


Fri

28

Sep

2018

Measuring sauces at the restaurant

Click the button below to see the latest demo of the ChillIpot - Scoville Meter from the ZP Chilli Group.


Fri

28

Sep

2018

Newsletter September 28

Welcome to this week's newsletter from Zimmer and Peacock. This newsletter is a mixture of news, stories and tech notes from Zimmer and Peacock. If you want to subscribe to our newsletter or have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock and our passion for biosensor technologies please don't hesitate to contact us.

ZP Speaks at MEMS and Sensors Conference

 

This week Zimmer and Peacock were delighted to speak at the MEMS and Sensors Conference in Grenoble France.

 

We covered everything from oxygen sensors, to potassium sensors, to lactate sensors, to hydrogen peroxide sensors, to glucose sensors, to chilli sensors, to pH sensors, to sodium sensors, to garlic sensors.

ZP in Brazil

 

ZP were delighted to be Sao Paulo recently, talking to the research teams and forming strong commercial bonds.

ZP - Unversidade de Sao Paulo

 

Zimmer and Peacock were delighted to meet new friends at the University of Sao Paulo this week.

 

ZP - The University of Bath

 

Zimmer and Peacock were delighted to speak recently as the University of Bath on how to commercialise biosensors and medical diagnostics.

ZP - Sensors and Biosensors in Indonesia

 

ZP was delighted to cement stronger relationships with the Indonesian sensor and biosensor community on a recent trip.

ZP and Zahner at ISE Bolognia

 

Thank you for speaking with Pavel and Jann at ISE Bolognia.

 

On our website we have put a link to Zahner's Potentiostat Technology and an introduction to Zimmer and Peacock

ZP and PalmSens - Antwerp

 

Zimmer and Peacock recently exhibited at SMOBE2018, alongside PalmSens.

ZP at USN Norway

 

Zimmer and Peacock has hired nine scientists and engineers so far from US, so this week we were delighted to go back and start the recruitment of the next generation of biosensors and medical diagnostic developers and manufacturers.

Wed

26

Sep

2018

ZP at USN Norway

Zimmer and Peacock has hired nine scientists and engineers so far from US, and so this week we were delighted to go back and start the recruitment of the next generation of biosensors and medical diagnostic developers and manufacturers.


Sat

22

Sep

2018

ZP and PalmSens - Antwerp

Zimmer and Peacock recently exhibited at SMOBE2018, alongside PalmSens.


Sat

22

Sep

2018

ZP and Zahner at ISE Bolognia

Thank you for speaking with Pavel and Jann at ISE Bolognia.

 

On this page we have put a link to Zahner's Potentiostat Technology and an introduction to Zimmer and Peacock


Sat

22

Sep

2018

ZP - Sensors and Biosensors in Indonesia

ZP was delighted to cement stronger relationships with the Indonesian sensor and biosensor community on a recent trip.


Sat

22

Sep

2018

ZP - The University of Bath

Zimmer and Peacock were delighted to speak recently as the University of Bath on how to commercialise biosensors and medical diagnostics.


Sat

22

Sep

2018

ZP - Unversidade de Sao Paulo

Zimmer and Peacock were delighted to meet new friends at the University of Sao Paulo this week.


Sat

22

Sep

2018

ZP in Brazil

ZP were delighted to be Sao Paulo recently, talking to the research teams and forming strong commercial bonds.


Sat

22

Sep

2018

ZP Speaks at MEMS and Sensors Conference

This week Zimmer and Peacock were delighted to speak at the MEMS and Sensors Conference in Grenoble France.

 

We covered everything from oxygen sensors, to potassium sensors, to lactate sensors, to hydrogen peroxide sensors, to glucose sensors, to chilli sensors, to pH sensors, to sodium sensors, to garlic sensors.


Fri

21

Sep

2018

Newsletter September 21

Welcome to this week's newsletter from Zimmer and Peacock. This newsletter is a mixture of news, stories and tech notes from Zimmer and Peacock. If you want to subscribe to our newsletter or have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock and our passion for biosensor technologies please don't hesitate to contact us.

Chilli Sensor honoured by customer

 

The ZP Chilli Technology Group has been honoured by one of our customers who has put our logo next to the Scoville Heat Unit.

University of Leicester - Zimmer and Peacock

 

Zimmer and Peacock have been invited to the University of Leicester to give a talk to the chemistry group.

 

Description: Dr. Martin Peacock will discuss his career and what it takes to bring a scientific idea to the market.

 

Speaker: Martin Peacock, Director, Zimmer and Peacock

 

Martin Peacock is an industrial bioelectrochemist, having worked at GSK and Abbott Diabetes, before catching the entrepreneurial bug and founding a number of companies. Martin has now set up companies in California, the UK and Norway and so has both a strong technical understanding coupled with the realities of manufacturing and commercializing biosensor technologies. Martin still authors academic papers, alongside writing business plans and developing business strategies.

 

Thu

20

Sep

2018

University of Leicester - Zimmer and Peacock

Zimmer and Peacock have been invited to the University of Leicester to give a talk to the chemistry group.

 

Description: Dr. Martin Peacock will discuss his career and what it takes to bring a scientific idea to the market.

 

Speaker: Martin Peacock, Director, Zimmer and Peacock

 

Martin Peacock is an industrial bioelectrochemist, having worked at GSK and Abbott Diabetes, before catching the entrepreneurial bug and founding a number of companies. Martin has now set up companies in California, the UK and Norway and so has both a strong technical understanding coupled with the realities of manufacturing and commercializing biosensor technologies. Martin still authors academic papers, alongside writing business plans and developing business strategies.

 


Sat

15

Sep

2018

Chilli Sensor honoured by customer

The ZP Chilli Technology Group has been honoured by one of our customers who has put our logo next to the Scoville Heat Unit.


Fri

14

Sep

2018

Newsletter September 14

Welcome to this week's newsletter from Zimmer and Peacock. This newsletter is a mixture of news, stories and tech notes from Zimmer and Peacock. If you want to subscribe to our newsletter or have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock and our passion for biosensor technologies please don't hesitate to contact us.

Made in Horten

 

Zimmer and Peacock are exhibiting at Made in Horten on the 12 October 2018.

 

Please come and meet the team there.

Measuring pH with Arduino

 

At Zimmer and Peacock we believe in helping our customers and collaborators get to market.

 

In this video we show a low cost set of electronics that can be used to get a signal from our pH electrode

 

We used the board in conjunction with Gravity: Analog pH Sensor / Meter Kit For Arduino.

Fri

14

Sep

2018

Made in Horten

Zimmer and Peacock are exhibiting at Made in Horten on the 12 October 2018.

 

 

Please come and meet the team there.


Fri

14

Sep

2018

Measuring pH with Arduino

At Zimmer and Peacock we believe in helping our customers and collaborators get to market.

 

In this video we show a low cost set of electronics that can be used to get a signal from our pH electrode


The board seen in the video was build in accordance with this schematic.

 

We used the board in conjunction with Gravity: Analog pH Sensor / Meter Kit For Arduino.


Fri

07

Sep

2018

Newsletter September 7

Welcome to this week's newsletter from Zimmer and Peacock. This newsletter is a mixture of news, stories and tech notes from Zimmer and Peacock. If you want to subscribe to our newsletter or have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock and our passion for biosensor technologies please don't hesitate to contact us.

100 micrometer electrodes

 

At Zimmer and Peacock we love electrochemistry as it offers a low cost sensor, biosensor and medical diagnostic.

 

In the adjacent image we show an electrochemical based sensor under a microscope, where it can be seen that the features of the electrode are on the order of 100 micrometers, which is the width of a human hair.

ZP expands labs

 

We are focused on productising and commercialising our collaborators projects and products in sensors, biosensors and medical diagnostics. As part of the effort we are often called upon to do lab work, so we have had to expand our labs to cope with the increase in business.

ZP expands into Indonesia

 

A central tenant at Zimmer and Peacock is to be an internal company and so were delighted to make new friends and contacts in Indonesia.

ZP Speak at International Conference on Agricultural Post Harvest

 

Zimmer and Peacock were delighted to attend and speak at the International conference on Agricultural and Postharvest Handling and Processing.

 

We talked about our willingness to partner on product development and manufacturing, and used our Chilli Sensor as the perfect case study.

The future is already wearables

 

At Zimmer and Peacock we are actively supporting wearable biosensor technologies through our contract development and manufacturing services; so that designers, engineers, scientists and entrepreneurs can incorporate biochemical assays into their smart devices, garments and health trackers.  

 

Find out more about our standard biosensors on our website, these formulations can be moved onto our wearable platform.

Making electrical connection with our/your CGM sensor

 

Zimmer and Peacock are a world leading contract sensor, biosensor and medical diagnostics development and manufacturing company, including continuous glucose monitoring (CGM).

 

At Zimmer and Peacock we understand the importance of making a great electrical  connection to a CGM sensor and so alongside our CGM sensors we ship connectors so people can start their in-vitro studies more successfully.

 

ZP - All carbon pH electrode

 

Zimmer and Peacock manufactures disposable pH sensors for single and continuous use. We have just expanded the range by manufacturing an all carbon version.

ZP Sponsoring BioEl2019 International Winterschool on Bioelectronics

 

Zimmer and Peacock are the world leader contract developer and manufacturer of sensors and biosensors, so we are product to be sponsoring the BIOEI 2019 conference.

Wed

05

Sep

2018

100 micrometer electrodes

At Zimmer and Peacock we love electrochemistry as it offers a low cost sensor, biosensor and medical diagnostic.

 

In the adjacent image we show an electrochemical based sensor under a microscope, where it can be seen that the features of the electrode are on the order of 100 micrometers, which is the width of a human hair.


Tue

04

Sep

2018

ZP expands labs

At ZP we are focused on productising and commercialising our collaborators projects and products in sensors, biosensors and medical diagnostics .

 

As part of the effort we are often called upon to do lab work, and so we have had to expand our labs to cope with the increase in buisness.


Sun

02

Sep

2018

ZP expands into Indonesia

A central tenant at Zimmer and Peacock is to be an internal company and so this we we were delighted to make new fiends and contact in Indonesia.


Sun

02

Sep

2018

ZP Speak at International Conference on Agricultural Post Harvest

Zimmer and Peacock were delighted to attend and speak at the International conference on Agricultural and Postharvest Handling and Processing.

 

We talked about our willingness to partner on product development and manufacturing, and used our Chilli Sensor as the perfect case study.


Sat

01

Sep

2018

The future is already wearables

At  Zimmer and Peacock  we are actively supporting wearable biosensor technologies through our contract development and manufacturing services; so that designers, engineers, scientists and entrepreneurs can incorporate biochemical assays into their smart devices, garments and health trackers.  

In the button below we have linked to our standard biosensors, these formulations can be moved onto our wearable platform.


Wearable Sensors - Statistics and Facts

Wearables, as the name suggests, are gadgets that can be worn. These devices usually have smart sensors and are connected to the internet for data exchange. 

 

THE HISTORY OF WEARABLES

Pulsar’s Calculator Wristwatch can be considered as the first consumer wearable device to achieve global success. In 2000, the first Bluetooth headset was sold and in 2004, the first GoPro was launched. The wearable market is promising, as the number of connected wearable devices worldwide is expected to jump from an estimate of 325 million in 2016 to over 830 million in 2020. 

 

WHO CURRENTLY USES WEARABLE DEVICES

Businesses, military forces and medical professionals have been using wearable technology for decades, but the private consumer market has recently started to feature items such as smart glasses, smart watches, hearables, fitness and health trackers, smart jewelry and smart clothing. The most successful wearable devices on the market are smart watches and health and fitness tracker. In fact, just over 170 million units of wearable wristwear devices are forecast to be shipped in 2020, more than any other wearable category. By 2018, smart watches are forecast to account for about half of all wearable unit sales worldwide. According to another forecast sales of smart watches are to reach 141 million units by 2018 worldwide. Apple’s operating system - watchOS - is the most used smart wristwear operating system at this time. watchOS is forecast to maintain this position until 2020, when Android/Android Wear is projected to become the most used wristwear OS. 

 

 

SMART WATCHES

The leading smart watch vendors are Apple, Samsung, Lenovo, Garmin and Pebble with Apple holding the largest share of the market. Despite its strong position in the smart watch market, Apple is not as strong of a player in the overall wearable industry. With a strong presence in the health and fitness wearable market, Fitbit has been a leader in the wearable industry since 2014, when the company held about 45 percent of the market share. As other companies such as Apple, Xiaomi, Garmin, and Samsung have also released wearable products, Fitbit’s market share has declined to around 20 percent at the end of 2016. In all of 2016 wearable device shipments amounted to about 112 million units. 

 

WHY IS THIS SO BIG AND WHERE ARE WE GOING?

The above statement only hints at the vast business and technological frontier that awaits the entrepreneurial pioneers that are now developing the smart items that will capture and amplify human civilization. Though it seems hyperbole at ZP we cannot over emphasize the magnitude of the opportunity that wearable sensors and biosensors present.  There is something irresistibly and overwhelmingly seductive in the attraction between humans and machines.  The Human-Cyber-Machine interface is addictive, and if you are not convinced then you need only look at pedestrians walking on a busy city street, where the majority are actively engaged with their smart phones.

A skeptic may point to static company growth results at FitBit or GoPro and object, but we believe the reason is that it is easy to measure your heart rate, your breathing or you blood pressure.  These are all data that any user already intuitively knows and so who needs a watch to tell you that you are breathing fast or that your heart rate is elevated after exercise. The next real step is when these companies can successfully integrate biochemical sensors, such as glucose, hydration, drug levels, stress markers, pregnancy hormones, adrenaline etc., etc. into a wearable monitors.  These are data points that are not accessible to the individual, and access to real-time instantaneous results will make a real difference in the behavior of elite athletes, amateur athletes, diabetics, enthusiastic gym goers, the elderly etc.

The border between health trackers and medical diagnostic/tracking devices is blurring and will continue to blur over the next few years.  Digital personalized medicine will be the fashion.  There is a very simple difference between going to the doctor, giving a blood sample and the laboratory processing and reporting the result to the doctor.  And finally, the doctor giving you the results along with an interpretation and a bill, of course.  The home glucose monitors allow a patient to take their blood glucose readings at home or wherever, log the data, make an actionable decision and react appropriately by taking insulin, doing nothing or eating some sugar. Eventually, turning the data over to the doctor and get an interpretation and a bill.  A great concern in society and 21st century civilization is data ownership, who owns the data?  In the case of laboratory results, the doctor owns or controls the data.  In the case of the home glucose monitor the patient owns the data.  As more and more wearable devices are sold and the sensor capabilities increase, this personal data will be controlled or effectively owned by the user.  This is both very powerful and democratic, because the wearable user will/can do quasi-scientific studies on himself and make behavioral decisions, this the essence of the Human-Cyber-Machine interface. As this process continues, the behavior of these individuals, and all of us, will change in unpredictable ways. Just like the smart phone users on the street, people are very likely to become addicted to the experience…’do not try taking these data producing wearables away from people...’

 

 

At Zimmer and Peacock we are a superfriendly team so please don't hesitate to contact us.

Sat

01

Sep

2018

Making electrical connection with our/your CGM sensor

Zimmer and Peacock are a world leading contract sensor, biosensor and medical diagnostics development and manufacturing company, including continuous glucose monitoring (CGM).

 

At Zimmer and Peacock we understand the importance of making a great electrical  connection to a CGM sensor and so alongside our CGM sensors we ship connectors so people can start their in-vitro studies more successfully.


Sat

01

Sep

2018

ZP - All carbon pH electrode

Zimmer and Peacock manufactures disposable pH sensors for single and continuous use. We have just expanded the range by manufacturing an all carbon version.


Tue

28

Aug

2018

ZP Sponsoring BioEl2019 International Winterschool on Bioelectronics

Zimmer and Peacock are the world leader contract developer and manufacturer of sensors and biosensors, so we are product to be sponsoring the BIOEI 2019 conference.

 

 


About the workshop

The integration of electronics with the biological world can be achieved by platforms using bio-inspired materials as well as strategies. Such bio-compatible electronics have the potential to transform current paradigms in green information technology and biomedical research. Realization of biodegradable or biocompatible, low-cost, large-volume materials and devices will contribute to sustainability in plastic "consumable" electronics. Biomaterials-based electronics with biomimetic interfaces can be utilized in medical technologies that require accurate sensing and stimulation of biological matter.

This will be a forum to bring together both veteran and young researchers to learn and discuss emerging topics in the field of bioelectronics. Topics include:

 

• Electronic/ionic signal transduction

• Conducting polymers in biochemistry and biomedicine

• Electronics based on biomaterials

• Optoelectronics at the interface with biology

• Electroceuticals

• Devices for electronic sensing of bioanalytes, and electronically-mediated drug delivery

• Iontronics, protonics

• Electronic interfaces with biochemistry

• Artificial skin

• Artificial retina

• Consideration of conduction in biomaterials, i.e. melanin, DNA, etc.

• Nature-inspired materials for energy harvesting applications

• Implantable electronics

• Nanoinjection, structured material interfaces with cells

• Biocompatible inorganic semiconductors and devices

• Neural Interface

• Clinical applications

• Plant electronics / bionics

• Tissue Engineering


Fri

24

Aug

2018

Newsletter August 24

Welcome to this week's newsletter from Zimmer and Peacock. This newsletter is a mixture of news, stories and tech notes from Zimmer and Peacock. If you want to subscribe to our newsletter or have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock and our passion for biosensor technologies please don't hesitate to contact us.

Gold electrodes for sensors and biosensors

 

This is an inconclusive post, but at ZP we recently took a look at two electrodes, the intention of both electrodes is for sensing.

 

One of the sensors in the image below is a commercial glucose strip (blue), whilst the other is an R and D electrode (green) from Zimmer and Peacock.

 

The commercial glucose strip was made by vapour deposition and laser ablation, whilst the ZP sensor was made by thick film screen printing.

 

Our expectation when looking under the microscope was that the commercial glucose strip would appear much finer/precise/accurate in it's edges and surfaces relative to the ZP thick film sensor. The actual result was that the screen printed electrode and the vapour deposited electrode looked pretty similar. This doesn't rule out that the vapour deposited electrode is in fact has a smoother and more reproducible surface when manufactured in volume than the screen printed electrodes, but a quick assessment under a microscope said that the two processes gave a similar finish.

 

If you are considering manufacturing and gold electrodes are part of your product then we would say the following 'if you are looking for feature sizes less than 200 microns then vapour deposition is a good technique. If you have electrodes whose feature sizes are greater than 200 microns then thick film printing is probably good enough. At the 1000 micron scale then screen printing is probably/definitely good enough'.

 

Every project and product and application is unique, so please contact ZP to discuss your specific requirements.

 

ZP launches Sodium Sensor/Sodium Ion

 

Zimmer and Peacock launches new sodium sensor. The sodium sensor is part of a growing list of sensors and biosensors from Zimmer and Peacock.

 

Zimmer and Peacock is a leader in contract development and manufacturing of sensors, biosensors and medical diagnostics.

ZP available on the AppStore

 

ZP are contract developers and manufacturers of sensors, biosensors and medical diagnostics, as part or our holistic approach we are also iOS developers. 

 

We have launched our most recent app to the Apple AppStore. The app only works in conjunction with our ChilliPot and is used to measure the hotness of Chilli Products.

Sensor and Assay Technology Readiness Levels

 

At Zimmer and Peacock we develop and manufacture sensors and assays for our clients.

 

We use NASA's Technology Readiness Levels to define what level a technology is at, or to what level we will bring or deliver the technology to. 

 

In parallel with the Technology Readiness Levels are the Manufacturing Readiness Levels, which we use to define how matured the production manufacturing is.

 

At Zimmer and Peacock we support our clients and customers through standard products, development services and manufacturing.

Fri

24

Aug

2018

Gold electrodes for sensors and biosensors

This is an inconclusive post, but at ZP we recently took a look at two electrodes, the intention of both electrodes is for sensing.

 

One of the sensors in the adjacent image is a commercial glucose strip (blue), whilst the other is an R and D electrode (green) from Zimmer and Peacock.

 

The commercial glucose strip was made by vapour deposition and laser ablation, whilst the ZP sensor was made by thick film screen printing.

 

Our expectation when looking under the microscope was that the commercial glucose strip would appear much finer/precise/accurate in it's edges and surfaces relative to the ZP thick film sensor. The actual result was that the screen printed electrode and the vapour deposited electrode looked pretty similar. This doesn't rule out that the vapour deposited electrode is in fact has a smoother and more reproducible surface when manufactured in volume than the screen printed electrodes, but a quick assessment under a microscope said that the two processes gave a similar finish.

 

If you are considering manufacturing and gold electrodes are part of your product then we would say the following 'if you are looking for feature sizes less than 200 microns then vapour deposition is a good technique. If you have electrodes whose feature sizes are greater than 200 microns then thick film printing is probably good enough. At the 1000 micron scale then screen printing is probably/definitely good enough'.

 

Every project and product and application is unique, so please contact ZP to discuss your specific requirements.

 

 


Wed

22

Aug

2018

ZP launches Sodium Sensor/Sodium Ion

Zimmer and Peacock launches new sodium sensor. The sodium sensor is  part of a growing list of sensors and biosensors from Zimmer and Peacock.

Zimmer and Peacock is a leader in contract development and manufacturing of sensors, biosensors and medical diagnostics.


Wed

22

Aug

2018

ZP available on the AppStore

ZP are contract developers and manufacturers of sensors, biosensors and medical diagnostics, as part or our holistic approach we are also iOS developers. 

 

We have launched our most recent app to the Apple AppStore. The app only works in conjunction with our ChilliPot and is used to measure the hotness of Chilli Products


Sat

18

Aug

2018

Sensor and Assay Technology Readiness Levels

At Zimmer and Peacock we develop and manufacture sensors and assays for our clients.

 

We use NASA's Technology Readiness Levels to define what level a technology is at, or to what level we will bring or deliver  the technology to. 

In parallel with the Technology Readiness Levels are the Manufacturing Readiness Levels, which we use to define how matured the production manufacturing is.

At Zimmer and Peacock we support our clients and customers through standard products, development services and manufacturing.

Technology Readiness Levels (TRL)

Manufacturing Readiness Levels (MRL)


Fri

17

Aug

2018

Newsletter August 17

Welcome to this week's newsletter from Zimmer and Peacock. This newsletter is a mixture of news, stories and tech notes from Zimmer and Peacock. If you want to subscribe to our newsletter or have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock and our passion for biosensor technologies please don't hesitate to contact us.

Analysing molecules by electrochemistry

 

There is a commercially and technically important fact that is not widely known, which is ..'if you can analyse a molecule by UV-Vis, Fluorescence Spectroscopy, Colorimetric assay, Surface Plasma Resonance etc then you can probably detect it by electrochemistry as well'..

 

Why use electrochemistry?

If you are looking for a super low cost  and robust detection/analysis/sensing technology, then electrochemistry is probably the best platform for you. Most home use glucose strips on the market are electrochemical and this is because the developers and manufacturers realised that they could make the electrochemical test strips at super low cost, that the electronics were low cost and that the sample, blood, could be analysed without any preparation, purification dilution etc.

 

The issue with electrochemistry

The issue with electrochemistry is that scientist are often taught  optical methods as undergraduates and so the techniques are very familiar to us, but electrochemistry and electroanalytical techniques are not so widely taught. At ZP we see our role in part to give people the tools and training to get started on using electrochemical techniques. Find out more on our website here

 

ZP Speaking - MEMS Sensors and Executive Congress

 

Zimmer and Peacock are speaking at the MEMS and Sensors Executive Congress at Napa this October.

 

Our abstract is:

 

Zimmer and Peacock see that sensors are a critical part of a number of Social and Commercial Revolutions, including the Internet of Things (IoT), Sensor Web and the growth of the Invitro Diagnostics Market (IVD). 

 

At Zimmer and Peacock we are partnering with academia and industry to ensure that there are enough good and commercially available sensors to meet the requirements of these new and growing markets. As part of this Zimmer and Peacock provides a range of products and services including: sensors, the necessary hardware, and customer specific Android and iOS applications, IP generation and scalable manufacturing. Part of the remit at Zimmer and Peacock is to innovate around our collaborator's inventions and to help bring ideas to market.

Pinout for ZP sensors and electrodes

 

At Zimmer and Peacock we believe in helping our customers get the most out of our sensors and so we are very keen on sharing information.

 

In the image below we show what the pinout is on a connector and where those pins must go to on the sensor/electrode.

 

Note if you are using PalmSens and DropSens equipment this information may still be relevant to you.

 

We are here to help so please don't hesitate to contact us.

 

Auto industry looks to ZP for inspiration

 

At ZP we are delighted that the Auto Industry looks to our flagship potentiostat for design ideas. 

 

In a side by side comparison between the AnaPot, a potentiostat optimised for sensors and biosensors, we were struck by its resemblance to the new Kia.

AnaPot also in Black

 

AnaPot is ZP's flagship potentiostat optimised for anyone designing biosensors, the latest model has ruggedised parts, and come in cool anodized alumina.

 

Fri

17

Aug

2018

ZP at AACC 2018

ZP had a great show at the AACC 2018.

At the conference we discussed everything from point-of-care development and manufacturing,  to wearable sensors.

Below we have put some useful links to our products and services.

 

If you have any questions please don't hesitate to contact us.


Thu

16

Aug

2018

Analysing molecules by electrochemistry

There is a commercially and technically important fact that is not widely known, which is ..'if you can analyse a molecule by UV-Vis, Fluorescence Spectroscopy, Colorimetric assay, Surface Plasma Resonance etc then you can probably detect it by electrochemistry as well'..

 

Why use electrochemistry?

If you are looking for a super low cost  and robust detection/analysis/sensing technology, then electrochemistry is probably the best platform for you. Most home use glucose strips on the market are electrochemical and this is because the developers and manufacturers realised that they could make the electrochemical test strips at super low cost, that the electronics were low cost and that the sample, blood, could be analysed without any preparation, purification dilution etc.

 

The issue with electrochemistry

The issue with electrochemistry is that scientist are often taught  optical methods as undergraduates and so the techniques are very familiar to us, but electrochemistry and electroanalytical techniques are not so widely taught. At ZP we see our role in part to give people the tools and training to get started on using electrochemical techniques.

 

 

 

 


How to get going?

In this quick tutorial we are assuming that you have some electrodes and a potentiostat sourced from Zimmer and Peacock, if not hopefully the notes are useful.

 

We seven seven steps in getting your first electrochemical data on the molecule of interest for you.

 

1st – I would connect a sensor to the Ana Pot and start the software. Once the connection is established, you should apply the settings according to the attached picture.

 

2nd – I would then pipette a blank solution (e.g. PBS) on the electrodes’ area, about 30 – 40 uL covering all electrodes.

 

3rd – I would the run a CV scan with the settings in step 1 and save the data. This would be the baseline.

 

4th – I would then replace the sensor and pipette a known concentration of molecule (e.g. 10 mg/dL) in solvent (e.g.phosphate buffer solution) on the electrodes’ area, 30 – 40 uL.

 

5th – Run the CV scan and save the data.

 

6th – You can then compare both CV scans and check for oxidation, or reduction, current peaks that do not appear on your baseline (e.g. only phosphate buffer solution). These will correspond to the presence of your molecule

 

7th – You can then test different concentrations of your molecule to see if the peak current detected is proportional to the concentration. If everything goes well, the higher the peak current, the higher is the furosemide concentration.

 

 

For a ZP Platinum sensor start with these settings.

 

 

For a ZP Carbon and Gold sensor start with these settings.

 

 


Initial Data

A client followed this exact advise and their initial data is shown in the adjacent image. it was clear that there was a large difference between the baseline signal and the sample with the compound of interest added.

Next Steps

The initial data above showed that at about approximately 50 mV there was a peak, and above 200 mV there was nothing interesting so the ZP Senior Scientist advised the client to do a second series of experiments, but where the upper voltage was limited to 600 mV and the compound of interest was varied so that we could see whether the peak of interest increased as a function of concentration.

Further data

Our client did as requested and varied the concentration between 0 and 10 mg/dL, by analysing the peak at 50 mV we could see that the peak height is proportional to the concentration of compound of interest; therefore we can conclude that we are able to detect the molecule of interest. 

 

A quick assessment of the data showed that the limit of detection (LoD) for this compound was approximately 1 mg/dL, for some applications this LoD is fine, but for other applications we may need to develop the assay sensitivity further. 


Zimmer and Peacock is super friendly company so feel free to contact us with any technical questions.

 

Tue

14

Aug

2018

ZP Speaking - MEMS Sensors and Executive Congress

Zimmer and Peacock are speaking at the MEMS and Sensors Executive Congress at Napa this October.

 

Our abstract is

 

Zimmer and Peacock see that sensors are a critical part of a number of Social and Commercial Revolutions, including the Internet of Things (IoT), Sensor Web and the growth of the Invitro Diagnostics Market (IVD). 

 

At Zimmer and Peacock, we are partnering with academia and industry to ensure that there are enough good and commercially available sensors to meet the requirements of these new and growing markets.  As part of this Zimmer and Peacock provides a range of products and services including: sensors, the necessary hardware, and customer specific Android and iOS applications, IP generation and scalable manufacturing.   Part of the remit at Zimmer and Peacock is to innovate around our collaborators' inventions and to help bring ideas to market.

Mon

13

Aug

2018

Pinout for ZP sensors and electrodes

At Zimmer and Peacock we believe in helping our customers get the most out of our sensors and so we are very keen on sharing information.

 

In the image below we show what the pinout is on a connector and where those pins must go to on the sensor/electrode.

 

Note if you are using PalmSens and DropSens equipment this information may still be relevant to you.

 

We are here to help so please don't hesitate to contact us.

 

 


If you have a 4-pin connector use the adjacent image.


Fri

10

Aug

2018

Auto industry looks to ZP for inspiration

At ZP we are delighted that the Auto Industry looks to our flagship potentiostat for design ideas. 

 

In a side by side comparison between the AnaPot, a potentiostat optimised for sensors and biosensors, we were struck by its resemblance to the new Kia.


Fri

10

Aug

2018

AnaPot also in Black

AnaPot is ZP's flagship potentiostat optimised for anyone designing biosensors, the latest model has ruggedised parts, and come in cool anodized alumina.

 


Fri

10

Aug

2018

Newsletter August 10

Welcome to this week's newsletter from Zimmer and Peacock. This newsletter is a mixture of news, stories and tech notes from Zimmer and Peacock. If you want to subscribe to our newsletter or have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock and our passion for biosensor technologies please don't hesitate to contact us.

Variation in screen-printed electrodes

 

At Zimmer and Peacock we are the only manufacturer of screen printed electrodes, biosensor, sensors and medical diagnostics who wafer-map our electrodes. 

 

For certain types of electrochemical sensors the signal is proportional to the working electrode area and so ZP is unique in that we functionally test the working electrode as part of our manufacturing process. 

 

In the adjacent image we have tested 52 electrodes with a standard solution using cyclic voltammetry. We have measured the peak height and have collected all the data we can see how the signal/peak height changes across the wafer. We can see that for this wafer our coefficient of variation is approximately 10%.

 

If someone was using this wafer to make sensors where the method of analysis was EIS (electrochemical impedance spectroscopy) or an amperometric technique we would report advise that the best variation they could expect is 10%, if they wanted better precision we would select electrodes from the wafer which we would take forward to convert into sensors.

Pt electrodes as biosensors

 

Zimmer and Peacock had a collaborator who was using a ZP platinum sensors in a flow cell. The user was wondering why the signal looked like it was changing at the beginning of the assay.

 

In the adjacent image you can see how the signal was changing when tested with 0 micromolar hydrogen peroxide.

 

The answer to this question can have a number of sources but an obvious answer is that the Pt is undergoing conversion from Pt to PtO2. The observation in the lab is often that someone will use at Pt electrode and the signal may take some time to settle, but then on further use of the electrode the electrode is stable. What we suspect at ZP is that the first time you use a sensor it is Pt but as soon a you apply a voltage, maybe 650 mV vs reference electrode then you will convert the top layer of Pt to PtO2. As the platinum is consumed the current due  to this process diminishes until the signal becomes stable.

Wed

08

Aug

2018

Variation in screen-printed electrodes

At Zimmer and Peacock we are the only manufacturer of screen printed electrodes, biosensor, sensors and medical diagnostics who wafer-map our electrodes. 

 

For certain types of electrochemical sensors the signal is proportional to the working electrode area and so ZP is unique in that we functionally test the working electrode as part of our manufacturing process. 

 

In the adjacent image we have tested 52 electrodes with a standard solution using cyclic voltammetry. We have measured the peak height and have collected all the data we can see how the signal/peak height changes across the wafer. We can see that for this wafer our coefficient of variation is approximately 10%.

 

If someone was using this wafer to make sensors where the method of analysis was EIS (electrochemical impedance spectroscopy) or an amperometric technique we would report advise that the best variation they could expect is 10%, if they wanted better precision we would select electrodes from the wafer which we would take forward to convert into sensors.


Fri

03

Aug

2018

Pt electrodes as biosensors

Zimmer and Peacock had a collaborator who was using a ZP platinum sensors in a flow cell. The user was wondering why the signal looked like it was changing at the beginning of the assay.

 

In the adjacent image you can see how the signal was changing when tested with 0 micromolar hydrogen peroxide.

 

The answer to this question can have a number of sources but an obvious answer is that the Pt is undergoing conversion from Pt to PtO2. The observation in the lab is often that someone will use at Pt electrode and the signal may take some time to settle, but then on further use of the electrode the electrode is stable. What we suspect at ZP is that the first time you use a sensor it is Pt but as soon a you apply a voltage, maybe 650 mV vs reference electrode then you will convert the top layer of Pt to PtO2. As the platinum is consumed the current due  to this process diminishes until the signal becomes stable.



Fri

03

Aug

2018

Wearable Biosensors

Zimmer and Peacock have brought the wearable biosensor for monitoring sweat etc a step closer. In this video we chat through the features that make this wearable.


Fri

03

Aug

2018

Newsletter August 3

Welcome to this week's newsletter from Zimmer and Peacock. This newsletter is a mixture of news, stories and tech notes from Zimmer and Peacock. If you want to subscribe to our newsletter or have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock and our passion for biosensor technologies please don't hesitate to contact us.

Pt electrodes as biosensors

 

Zimmer and Peacock had a collaborator who was using a ZP platinum sensors in a flow cell. The user was wondering why the signal looked like it was changing at the beginning of the assay.

 

In the image you can see how the signal was changing when tested with 0 micromolar hydrogen peroxide.

 

The answer to this question can have a number of sources but an obvious answer is that the Pt is undergoing conversion from Pt to PtO2. The observation in the lab is often that someone will use at Pt electrode and the signal may take some time to settle, but then on further use of the electrode the electrode is stable. What we suspect at ZP is that the first time you use a sensor it is Pt but as soon a you apply a voltage, maybe 650 mV vs reference electrode then you will convert the top layer of Pt to PtO2. As the platinum is consumed the current due  to this process diminishes until the signal becomes stable.

Wearable Biosensors

 

Zimmer and Peacock have brought the wearable biosensor for monitoring sweat etc a step closer. In this video we chat through the features that make this wearable.

New concept in biosensor testing

 

At Zimmer and Peacock we are big fans of new technology that is relevant to the biosensor development effort. 

 

The new biosensor tester is perfect for anyone who has determined there assay conditions and needs to start high throughput testing.

Thu

02

Aug

2018

New concept in biosensor testing

At Zimmer and Peacock we are big fans of new technology that is relevant to the biosensor development effort. 

 

The new biosensor tester is perfect for anyone who has determined there assay conditions and needs to start high throughput testing.


Fri

27

Jul

2018

Newsletter July 27

Welcome to this week's newsletter from Zimmer and Peacock. This newsletter is a mixture of news, stories and tech notes from Zimmer and Peacock. If you want to subscribe to our newsletter or have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock and our passion for biosensor technologies please don't hesitate to contact us.

ZP at CamBridgeSens

 

Zimmer and Peacock are keen supporters of Cambridge University's Sensors Research and so we are delighted to be attending Sensors Day 2018 for the second year running.

Electrochemical Methods in Corrosion Research 2018

 

Zimmer and Peacock were delighted to attend the Electrochemical Methods in Corrosion Research 2018.

 

We discussed two main themes:

 

1) Zahner instrumentation for corrosion research.

 

2) The translation of corrosion research into products.

Corrosion at Zimmer and Peacock

 

At Zimmer and Peacock we are 100% pragmatic and we understand that corrosion is multi-faceted problem and though we can inhibit corrosion one can never say that corrosion will ever go away.

 

At Zimmer and Peacock we support our clients and collaborators in three ways:

 

1) Fundamental Research and Characterization - ZP support the academic and industrial community by the supply and support of the EIS systems from Zahner. 

 

2) The provision of chemical sensors for corrosion environmental monitoring.

 

3) The ZP ability to reduce potentiostat systems down to low cost potentiostats.

Oxford University senses spicy deal with Zimmer and Peacock

 

Oxford University Innovation licenses sensors for garlic, ginger and turmeric to Zimmer and Peacock.

 

Handheld devices which can accurately detect and quantify the levels of garlic, ginger and turmeric in foodstuffs form the basis of a new licensing deal between Oxford University Innovation (OUI), the research commercialisation arm of Oxford University, and electrochemical sensor manufacturer Zimmer and Peacock (ZP).

 

The sensors were developed by Professor Richard Compton and his team at the Compton Group in the Oxford University Department of Chemistry, which also developed calibration free pH measurement. The palm-sized devices utilise electrochemical sensing to analyse a liquid sample much the same way a diabetic monitor blood sugar and delivers results to a smartphone or other display in less than a minute.

 

The Compton Group and ZP deal builds on a pre-existing relationship following the prior licensing of ChilliPot, a sensor which provides an accurate measurement of a chilli’s spiciness.

ZP attending University of Bath's C3Bio Inaugral Event

 

Zimmer and Peacock is attending the Inaugural event of the Centre for Biosensors, Bioelectronics and Biodevices (C3Bio) at the University of Bath on the 7th September 2018.

 

C3Bio is a new multidisciplinary research centre with over 70 members (15 core academics, 18 affiliated academics, ~10 postdocs, ~30 PhD students), bringing together a critical mass of researchers from engineering, physical, life and social sciences working on different aspects of biosensors (sensing elements and techniques), bioelectronics (electrophysiology and bioelectronic circuits) and biodevices (device co-design and integration).

Zimmer and Peacock speaking at Cambridge University

 

Zimmer and Peacock are delighted to be invited to speak at cambridge University to the Cambridge CDT course.

 

Zimmer and Peacock will be talking about what it takes to commercialize electrochemical sensors and biosensors.

 

Johnson Matthey Lecture Theatre (Lecture Theatre 2) at the Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology for the lecture at 11.30am on 27 September 2018.

 

ZP Wearable Biosensor Pack starts shipping

 

The ZP wearable biosensor pack starts to ship.

 

At Zimmer and Peacock we see that wearable sensors are the future, but there is a distinct lack of wearable biosensors and applications, that is why ZP has started to ship its wearable biosensor pack to customers and clients.

ICAPHP2108

 

Zimmer and Peacock are delighted to be attending the ICAPHP in Bali this August.

 

Zimmer and Peacock will be presenting their ChilliSensor and talking about what it takes to develop, manufacture and commercialise a sensor for food and agricultural purposes.

 

ZP at the BMA

 

Zimmer and Peacock were delighted to be invited to a Cancer UK's event for tackling early prognostics in cancer. The event was held at the BMA in London.

 

Zimmer and Peacock is the UK's biggest independent contract developer and manufacturer of IVD and in-vivo sensors for monitoring human health

Thu

26

Jul

2018

ZP at CamBridgeSens

Zimmer and Peacock are keen supporters of Cambridge University's Sensors Research and so we are delighted to be attending Sensors Day 2018 for the second year running.


Thu

26

Jul

2018

Electrochemical Methods in Corrosion Research 2018

Zimmer and Peacock were delighted to attend the Electrochemical Methods in Corrosion Research 2018.

 

We discussed two main themes.

 

1) Zahner instrumentation for corrosion research.

 

2) The translation of corrosion research into products.


Thu

26

Jul

2018

Corrosion at Zimmer and Peacock

At Zimmer and Peacock we are 100 % pragmatic and we understand that corrosion is multi-faceted problem, and though we can inhibit corrosion one can never say that corrosion will ever go away.

 

At Zimmer and Peacock we support our clients and collaborators in three ways:

 

1) Fundamental Research and Characterization - ZP support the academic and industrial community by the supply and support of the EIS systems from Zahner. 

 

2) The provision of chemical sensors for corrosion environmental monitoring.

 

3) The ZP ability to reduce potentiostat systems down to low cost potentiostats.

The chemical sensors from Zimmer and Peacock suitable for corrosion environmental monitoring includes:

Once we you have fully characterized your corrosion system on a Zahner potentiostat ZP can take your assay and translate it onto flexible low cost flexible system 


Thu

26

Jul

2018

Oxford University senses spicy deal with Zimmer and Peacock

Oxford University Innovation licenses sensors for garlic, ginger and turmeric to Zimmer and Peacock.

 

Handheld devices which can accurately detect and quantify the levels of garlic, ginger and turmeric in foodstuffs form the basis of a new licensing deal between Oxford University Innovation (OUI), the research commercialisation arm of Oxford University, and electrochemical sensor manufacturer Zimmer and Peacock (ZP).

 

The sensors were developed by Professor Richard Compton and his team at the Compton Group in the Oxford University Department of Chemistry, which also developed calibration free pH measurement. The palm-sized devices utilise electrochemical sensing to analyse a liquid sample much the same way a diabetic monitor blood sugar and delivers results to a smartphone or other display in less than a minute.

 

The Compton Group and ZP deal builds on a pre-existing relationship following the prior licensing of ChilliPot, a sensor which provides an accurate measurement of a chilli’s spiciness.

 

Dr Martin Peacock, CEO at Zimmer and Peacock, said:

 

“It’s great to be able to take the latest developments from the Richard’s lab and then use our skills to develop and market them to the customers. Our products must be easy to use and these electrochemical sensors lend themselves well to compact electronics integrated through to simple smartphone apps.  We’re always keen to learn about the sensing issue that Richard and his group decide to tackle next.”

 

Prof Compton added:

 

“I am delighted to see our sensors being developed by the capable and experienced team at Z&P. They understand the science, the market, and have an impressively dynamic and proactive approach.”

 

Andrew Bowen, Senior Licensing and Ventures Manager at Oxford University Innovation, added:

 

“We think ZP is the perfect partner for developing these latest electrochemical sensors to emerge from Professor Compton’s work.  They bring a wealth of technical and commercial experience, have a prior relationship with the Compton Group, and have already set up a dedicated team to bring these products to market, working with customers to ensure the sensors can meet their individual needs.”


Thu

26

Jul

2018

ZP attending University of Bath's C3Bio Inaugral Event

Zimmer and Peacock is attending the Inaugural event of the Centre for Biosensors, Bioelectronics and Biodevices (C3Bio) at the University of Bath on the 7th September 2018.

 

C3Bio is a new multidisciplinary research centre with over 70 members (15 core academics, 18 affiliated academics, ~10 postdocs, ~30 PhD students), bringing together a critical mass of researchers from engineering, physical, life and social sciences working on different aspects of biosensors (sensing elements and techniques), bioelectronics (electrophysiology and bioelectronic circuits) and biodevices (device co-design and integration).


Wed

25

Jul

2018

Zimmer and Peacock speaking at Cambridge University

Zimmer and Peacock are delighted to be invited to speak at cambridge University to the Cambridge CDT course.

 

Zimmer and Peacock will be talking about what it takes to commercialize electrochemical sensors and biosensors.

 

 

Johnson Matthey Lecture Theatre (Lecture Theatre 2) at the Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology for the lecture at 11.30am on 27 September 2018.

 


Tue

24

Jul

2018

ZP Wearable Biosensor Pack starts shipping

The ZP wearable biosensor pack starts to ship.

 

At Zimmer and Peacock we see that wearable sensors are the future, but there is a distinct lack of wearable biosensors and applications, that is why ZP has started to ship its wearable biosensor pack to customers and clients.


Tue

24

Jul

2018

ICAPHP2108

Zimmer and Peacock are  delighted to be attending the ICAPHP in Bali this August.

 

Zimmer and Peacock will be presenting their ChilliSensor and talking about what it takes to develop, manufacture and commercialise a sensor for food and agricultural purposes.


Sun

22

Jul

2018

Electrochemical Methods in Corrosion Research 2018

Zimmer and Peacock are attending the Electrochemical Methods in Corrosion Research 2018 with our partners Zahner.

 

 


Sun

22

Jul

2018

ZP at the BMA

Zimmer and Peacock were delighted to be invited to a

Cancer UK's event for tackling early prognostics in cancer. The event was held at the BMA in London.

 

Zimmer and Peacock is the UK's biggest independent contract developer and manufacturer of IVD and in-vivo sensors for monitoring human health


Fri

20

Jul

2018

Newsletter July 20

Welcome to this week's newsletter from Zimmer and Peacock. This newsletter is a mixture of news, stories and tech notes from Zimmer and Peacock. If you want to subscribe to our newsletter or have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock and our passion for biosensor technologies please don't hesitate to contact us.

Biosensor Arrays

 

Zimmer and Peacock creates biosensor arrays from it's biosensor catalogue. We are able to place 4 biosensors within a small footprint, for example 4 glucose sensors, 4 pH sensors, 2 glucose sensors with 1 potassium sensor and 1 lacate sensor etc.

 

The biosensor array platform from Zimmer and Peacock allows for over 256 combinations of sensor from our pH, glucose, lactate and pH sensors for example. Find out more on our website here

ZP at Medica

 

Zimmer and Peacock is a world leading independent developer and manufacturer of medical diagnostics and biosensor so we will be attending Medica this year. Please contact us to meet us there.

Diabetes Technology Meeting

 

Zimmer and Peacock are a world leading contract developer and manufacturer of SMBG and CGM sensors and electronics. We are delighted to be attending the DTM meeting this November, please contact us to meet us there.

Cambridge University Masterclass on Biosensors

 

For the second year running ZP has partnered with the University of Cambridge to run a Masterclass on Biosensors, this masterclass is very unique as we believe you learn by doing and so the 2-day event will involve a lot of practicals performed by the attendees.

 

Please visit our website to attend and see videos of some of the practicals you will perform.

Sensors in Food and Agriculture

 

Zimmer and Peacock are contract developers of sensors for food and agriculture, as demonstrated by our chilli sensor.

 

We are delighted to be exhibiting at Sensors in Food and Agriculture 2018 the 3rd annual Sensors in Food and Agriculture Conference 18-19 July 2018, John Innes Centre, Norwich Science Park, Norwich NR4 7UH United Kingdom.

Tue

17

Jul

2018

Biosensor Arrays

Zimmer and Peacock creates biosensor arrays from it's biosensor catalogue. We are able to place 4 biosensors within a small footprint, for example 4 glucose sensors, 4 pH sensors, 2 glucose sensors with 1 potassium sensor and 1 lacate sensor etc.

 

The biosensor array platform from Zimmer and Peacock allows for over 256 combinations of sensor from our pH, glucose, lactate and pH sensors for example.

 

 

Please feel free to order some biosensor arrays.

Biosensor Array

Choose any combination of biosensors from our catalogue

600,00 €
Add to Cart
  • Available
  • Ships within 5 days

Mon

16

Jul

2018

ZP at Medica

Zimmer and Peacock is a world leading independent developer and manufacturer of medical diagnostics and biosensor so we will be attending Medical this year. Please contact us to meet us there.

Mon

16

Jul

2018

Diabetes Technology Meeting

Zimmer and Peacock are a world leading contract developer and manufacturer of SMBG and CGM sensors and electronics. we are delighted to be attending the DTM meeting this November, please contact us ot meet us there.

Mon

16

Jul

2018

Cambridge University Masterclass on Biosensors

For the second year running ZP has partnered with the University of Cambridge to run a Masterclass on Biosensors, this masterclass is very unique as we believe you learn by doing and so the 2-day event will involve a lot of practicals performed by the attendees.

 

Please see the links below to attend and see videos of some of the practicals you will perform.


Sun

15

Jul

2018

Sensors in Food and Agriculture

Zimmer and Peacock are contract developers of sensors for food and agriculture, as demonstrated by our chilli sensor.

 

We are delighted to be exhibiting at Sensors in Food and Agriculture 2018 the 3rd annual Sensors in Food and Agriculture Conference 18-19 July 2018

John Innes Centre, Norwich Science Park, Norwich NR4 7UH United Kingdom.


Fri

13

Jul

2018

Newsletter July 13

Welcome to this week's newsletter from Zimmer and Peacock. This newsletter is a mixture of news, stories and tech notes from Zimmer and Peacock. If you want to subscribe to our newsletter or have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock and our passion for biosensor technologies please don't hesitate to contact us.

Application Note for measuring glucose in soft drinks

 

The detection of glucose is important in many industries and applications, from the monitoring of glucose for diabetics, to knowing the sugar in a soft drink, to measuring glucose in a bioreactor or cell culture. 

 

In this application note on our website we provide a simple experiment that can be performed outside of a laboratory with readily available drinks from the supermarket and is intended to test and to gather the first data from a glucose sensor. 

 

With a glucose sensor one can perform quantitative and qualitative experiments. A quantitative experiment is where we measure and report the amount of glucose in a drop of blood for example.

 

The application experiment described within this document is a qualitative experiment, which requires no chemicals and can demonstrate a clear response by the sensor to regular coke relative to coke zero which has no sugar. The output from the experiment is qualitative in that the output of the experiment is ‘YES or NO, glucose is present’. Find out more on our website. 

ZP available in France

 

Zimmer and Peacock are delighted to featured on the Darwin Microfluidics webstore for our pH, glucose, oxygen and lactate sensors and developers kit.  

 

 

Biomarkers Boston 2018

 

Zimmer and Peacock were delighted to exhibit at Biomarkers Boston 2018.

 

Zimmer and  Peacock is a contract developer and manufacture of biosensors and medical diagnostics, where we partner with our clients to bring sensors and assays to the market.

ElecNano8

 

Zimmer and Peacock were delighted to exhibit at ElectroNano8.

 

The mission at ZP is to provide products to aid within electrochemical investigations and to partner on product development and manufacturing where electrochemistry is at the heart of the technology.

 

We partner with both academia and industry.

 

We have a case study on how an academic partnership with ZP led to a product on the market.

 

Please if you have questions regarding ZP don't hesitate to contact us.

ZP Programme Featured at Portsmouth

 

ZP participates on our clients clinical trials so we are delighted to have a ZP programme appear on the Portsmouth Technologies Trials Unit flyer.

 

At Zimmer and Peacock we develop and manufacture biosensors and medical diagnostics for our clients, including breath assays.

Wed

11

Jul

2018

Application Note for measuring glucose in soft drinks

Download this application note as a PDF

ZP Glucose Sensor Coke Application Notev
Adobe Acrobat Document 936.1 KB

INTRODUCTION

The detection of glucose is important in many industries and applications, from the monitoring of glucose for diabetics, to knowing the sugar in a soft drink, to measuring glucose in a bioreactor or cell culture. 

In this application note we provide a simple experiment that can be performed outside of a laboratory with readily available drinks from the supermarket, and is intended to test and to gather the first data from a glucose sensor 

With a glucose sensor one can perform quantitative and qualitative experiments. A quantitative experiment is where we measure and report the amount of glucose in a drop of blood for example, see adjacent figure.

The application experiment described within this document is a qualitative experiment, which requires no chemicals and can demonstrate a clear response by the sensor to regular coke relative to coke zero which has no sugar. The output from the experiment is qualitative in that the output of the experiment is ‘YES or NO, glucose is present’. 


THEORY

In this application we take a Zimmer and Peacock glucose sensor and use it in conjunction with an AnaPot potentiostat, though the potentiostats from PalmSens also work in this application.  

We will demonstrate the change in signal for ZP glucose sensor as we go from coke zero to normal coke. 

A ZP glucose sensor is a Type One Glucose Sensor. A Type One Glucose Sensor typically utilizes glucose oxidase (GOx) as the sensing enzyme and oxygen naturally present in the solution as the mediator. The GOx enzyme catalyses the reaction between oxygen and glucose. with glucose initially converted to glucolactone, whilst the oxygen is converted to hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide can diffuse to the working electrode where it is oxidized back to oxygen and two electrons are released to the electrode, these electronics are seen as a current by the potentiostat, see adjacent figure.

The glucose oxidase in the ZP glucose sensors is immobilized, this means that the enzyme is held within a polymer and is not free to diffuse away from the sensor. This immobilized enzyme is a benefit as the sensors can be run in continuous monitoring operation where the sensors are within the sample and continuously measure the glucose signal.  The ZP sensor shares some similarities to those of Dexcom and Medtronic which are also Type One Glucose Sensors with an immobilized enzyme formulation. The ZP glucose sensor can be contrasted with all/most self-monitoring-blood glucose strips (SMBG), where the enzyme formulation is soluble and dissolves into the sample. These SMBG sensors are therefore a onetime use and not suitable for continuous monitoring. 


PRACTICAL

To see a video demonstration of the application described within this document please see this video.

The hardware we use in the application note is the AnaPot and the ZP Glucose sensor.


EXPERIMENTAL STEPS

To perform this experiment please follow these steps.

 

  • STEP ONE – Please place the ZP glucose sensor in the front of the AnaPot, or PalmSens, as shown in the adjacent Figure.

  • STEP TWO - The software is set up in accordance with the adjacent figure.

  • STEP THREE - Adding sample - In the first instance add the coke zero as shown below, see adjacent figure.

  • STEP FOUR - Start the potentiostat - Please start the potentiostat by clicking the button in the software, see adjacent figure.

When the potentiostat is first started and coke zero is on the sensor the signal will look like that in the adjacent Figure.


  • STEP FIVE - Adding a drop of normal coke - After about 200 seconds add 10 microlitres of normal coke to the 100 microlitre drop of coke zero which is already upon the sensor, see the  adjacent figure.

Very quickly the magnitude of the signal increases, as shown in the adjacent figure, this is due to the biochemical reaction and the subsequent oxidation of the hydrogen peroxide on the working electrode of the glucose biosensor.

CLEANING AND STORING THE ELECTRODE

As discussed, the ZP Glucose sensor is a Type One Glucose sensor, the ideal way of storing the sensor is to:

 

• STEP ONE - Rinse the end of the sensors that was in contact with the coke with water, this can be tap water but ideally we use deionized water. 

• STEP TWO – Gently draw the water of the sensor using a tissue, we are just trying to gently dry the sensor before we store the sensor.

• STEP THREE – Please store the sensor in a cool dark place a fridge at approximately 5 degC.  Please note that we recommend these conditions to extend the life of the sensor, but you can leave the sensor out in the air at room temperature, but to get the longest life from the sensors then please use the recommended storage conditions.


Tue

10

Jul

2018

ZP available in France

Zimmer and Peacock are delighted to featured on the Darwin Microfluidics webstore for our pH, glucose, oxygen and lactate sensors and developers kit.  

 

Click the link to see us there.


Mon

09

Jul

2018

Biomarkers Boston 2018

Zimmer and Peacock were delighted to exhibit at Biomarkers Boston 2018.

 

Zimmer and  Peacock is a contract developer and manufacture of biosensors and medical diagnostics, where we partner with our clients to bring sensors and assays to the market.


Mon

09

Jul

2018

ElecNano8

Zimmer and Peacock were delighted to exhibit at ElectroNano8.

 

The mission at ZP is to provide products to aid within electrochemical investigations, and to partner on product development and manufacturing where electrochemistry is at the heart of the technology.

 

We partner with  both academia and industry.

 

We have a case study on how an academic partnership with ZP led to a product on the market.

 

Please if you have questions regarding ZP don't hesitate to contact us.


Sun

08

Jul

2018

ZP Programme Featured at Portsmouth

ZP participates on our clients clinical trials so we are delighted to have a ZP programme appear on the Portsmouth Technologies Trials Unit flyer.

At Zimmer and Peacock we develop and manufacture biosensors and medical diagnostics for our clients, including breath assays.


Fri

06

Jul

2018

Newsletter July 6

Welcome to this week's newsletter from Zimmer and Peacock. This newsletter is a mixture of news, stories and tech notes from Zimmer and Peacock. If you want to subscribe to our newsletter or have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock and our passion for biosensor technologies please don't hesitate to contact us.

Glucose Sensor Demo

 

Zimmer and Peacock provides a glucose sensor to our clients to help in their development programmes, to aid in their research and get our clients to market ASAP.

 

In this video we show you how to test a sensor when you first get it.

Potassium Sensor Demo

 

Zimmer and Peacock provides potassium sensors to help clients and collaborators fast track their sensor development programmes, to aid in their research and get our clients to market ASAP.

 

In this video we show you how to test a sensor when you first get it.

Summer Meeting of Bioelectrochemistry

 

Zimmer and Peacock are proud  sponsors of SMOBE, and we look forward to attending this year.

 

Modern electrochemistry is a discipline at the interface between chemistry, physics and biology. The summer meeting covers the breadth and depth of modern interdisciplinary bio-electrochemistry. The invited key-note lecturers focus on the basics of electrochemistry, protein and DNA electrochemistry and, finally, on micro and nanoscale bio-electrochemical applications. Additionally, PhD students and postdocs are invited to contribute by a poster or oral presentation in one of the above topics.

Renal Panel Developers Kit

 

Zimmer and Peacock believe that the future for society is accurate point of care monitoring of patients, and that is why we have put together the Renal Panel Developers Kit.

 

The Renal Panel Kit answers the question, how quickly can I get through the development phase of my renal application and into my manufacturing phase, and get my ideas and products to market? 

 

Find out more on our website here

Oxygen Sensor Demo

 

Zimmer and Peacock provides an oxygen sensor to help clients and collaborators fast track their sensor development programmes, to aid in their research and get our clients to market ASAP.

 

In this video we show you how to test a sensor when you first get it.

Nanofluidics in physics and biology

 

Zimmer and Peacock are talking and exhibiting at Nanofluidics in Physics and Biology in Lyon on the 9 to 12 July. ZImmer and Peacock has a suite of nanopore technology, and we will be presenting this technology at the conference. 

Sensor 2018 San Jose

 

Thank you for talking to Jim and Chantelle this week at Sensor 2018 San Jose.

 

At Zimmer and Peacock we have a different philosophy, which is 'what do you want to achieve as opposed to what do you need?' This means we are able to bring the decades of experience of our team to your sensing and sensor needs and problems.

 

Hacking a potentiostat channel to give a temperature channel

 

If you have one or more channels on your potentiostat it could be useful to use one as a temperature channel in a particular experiment.  In this hack we tell you how to to it.

 

To perform this hack you will need:

 

2 x dipolar connectors

1 x thermocouple

 

Your will connect the dipolar connector to the thermocouple as shown on our website here.

Rapid Testing of Biosensors

 

If you are developing a biosensor or sensor it is important that you are able to make rapid and repeatable electrical connection to the sensors and biosensors under test. At ZP we often use the AnaPot Single Channel Test Jig, as it provides a platform upon which we can rapidly test sensors.

Wed

04

Jul

2018

Glucose Sensor Demo

Zimmer and Peacock provides a glucose sensor to our clients to help in their development programmes, to aid in their research and get our clients to market ASAP.

 

In this video we show you how to test a sensor when you first get it.


Wed

04

Jul

2018

Potassium Sensor Demo

Zimmer and Peacock provides potassium sensors to help clients and collaborators fast track their sensor development programmes, to aid in their research and get our clients to market ASAP.

 

In this video we show you how to test a sensor when you first get it.


Wed

04

Jul

2018

Summer Meeting of Bioelectrochemistry

Zimmer and Peacock are proud  sponsors of SMOBE, and we look forward to attending this year.

 

Modern electrochemistry is a discipline at the interface between chemistry, physics and biology. The summer meeting covers the breadth and depth of modern interdisciplinary bio-electrochemistry. The invited key-note lecturers focus on the basics of electrochemistry, protein and DNA electrochemistry and, finally, on micro and nanoscale bio-electrochemical applications. Additionally, PhD students and postdocs are invited to contribute by a poster or oral presentation in one of the above topics.

 

 


Wed

04

Jul

2018

Renal Panel Developers Kit

Zimmer and Peacock believe that the future for society is accurate point of care monitoring of patients, and that is why we have put together the Renal Panel Developers Kit.

 

The Renal Panel Kit answers the question, how quickly can I get through the development phase of my renal application and into my manufacturing phase, and get my ideas and products to market?

 

The renal panel starter kit comes with:

 

1) 10 x pH sensors

2) 10 x potassium sensors

3) 10 x sodium sensors

4) 10 x glucose sensors

5) 10 x oxygen sensors

6) Test solutions for all sensors

7) Electronics to measure sensors

 

Note the sensors are reusable in the development phase. We do advise that if you are truly wanting to make a product you/we can manufacture the sensors at a price point which means that they can be used once and disposed of, thus avoiding contamination between patients.

 

If you want other or additional analytes then please contact us.

 

 

 

 


The kit comes with the electronics and test solutions, so you can hit the ground running on your commercialization roadmap. Teams receiving our kits can obtain biochemical  data within an hour of opening the box. 

 

Importantly the kit is supported by a technical team who can train you and your team through live online demonstrations, and a library of how-to-videos.


Buy now

Renal Panel Developers Kit

The promise is everything in the box to start your renal panel development

5.499,00 €
Add to Cart
  • Available
  • Ships within 5 days

If you want to buy parts of the kit then please browse the buttons.

Tue

03

Jul

2018

Oxygen Sensor Demo

Zimmer and Peacock provides an oxygen sensor to help clients and collaborators fast track their sensor development programmes, to aid in their research and get our clients to market ASAP.

 

In this video we show you how to test a sensor when you first get it.


Tue

03

Jul

2018

Nanofluidics in physics and biology

Zimmer and Peacock are talking and exhibiting at Nanofluidics in Physics and Biology in Lyon on the 9 to 12 July. ZImmer and Peacock has a suite of nanopore technology, and we will be presenting this technology at the conference. 

Sat

30

Jun

2018

Sensor 2018 San Jose

Thank you for talking to Jim and Chantelle this week at Sensor 2018 San Jose.

 

At Zimmer and Peacock we have a different philosophy, which is 'what do you want to achieve as opposed to what do you need?' This means we are able to bring the decades of experience of our team to your sensing and sensor needs and problems.

 

 


Fri

29

Jun

2018

Hacking a potentiostat channel to give a temperature channel

If you have one or more channels on your potentiostat it could be useful to use one as a temperature channel in a particular experiment.  In this hack we tell you how to to it.

 

To perform this hack you will need:

 

  • 2 x dipolar connectors
  • 1 x thermocouple

 

Your will connect the dipolar connector to the thermocouple as shown.


Following the connection of the dipolar connectors to the thermocouple it is next necessary to connect to the potentiostat according to the adjacent image.

 

 

The settings on the potentiostat channel that are going to be used shoud be in line with the following...'to setup the potentiostat software with a thermocouple set the measurement technique to Amperometric Detection/Chronoamperometry. Set the current range from 1µA to 1mA. Set all pretreatment settings to 0. In amperometric detection settings set “t equilibration time” and “E dc” to 0. Set the “t interval” and “t run” accordingly to your measurement. An example of the configutration is shown in the adjacent screen shot.


Lastly your potentiostat software will show the temperature data as a current, to convert the current back into temperature use the adjacent equation.


Fri

29

Jun

2018

Rapid Testing of Biosensors

If you are developing a biosensor or sensor it is important that you are able to make rapid and repeatable electrical connection to the sensors and biosensors under test. At ZP we often use the AnaPot Single Channel Test Jig, as it provides a platform upon which we can rapidly test sensors.


Fri

29

Jun

2018

Newsletter June 29

Welcome to this week's newsletter from Zimmer and Peacock. This newsletter is a mixture of news, stories and tech notes from Zimmer and Peacock. If you want to subscribe to our newsletter or have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock and our passion for biosensor technologies please don't hesitate to contact us.

An alternative to traditional glass electrodes

 

Traditional glass pH electrodes have been around for decades, but there has been a question is it possible to get away from traditional glass electrodes and replace them with a technology that could provide the performance of a glass electrode but with the low cost fabrication of techniques such as screen-printing.

 

At Zimmer and Peacock we are striving to get pH sensors to 5 cents or less, and we are on the way to achieving this.

 

A recent analysis of pH sensors from a ZP manufactured pH sensor batch showed we are bringing mass produced low cost screen printed pH sensors to the market.

 

Modern Organic Electrochemistry/Analytical Electrochemistry

 

Electrochemistry has a lot to offer the chemist, it can be used:

 

1) As a reagent free method of oxidation/reduction in organic synthesis.

 

2) Electroanalytical chemistry can be used to rank a series of drugs in their propensity to oxidation when considering their metabolic stability.

 

The issue with electrochemistry of the past was the electrochemical technology. Traditional electrochemical equipment was developed by electrochemists for use by electrochemists. A chemist who wishes to use electrochemical techniques is interested in the product of the experiment and not in the electrochemistry itself.

 

The problems with traditional electrochemistry have been:

 

1) ISSUE ONE - Large bulky potentiostats occupying too big a footprint on the bench space.

 

2) ISSUE TWO - Too many cables; traditional electrochemical experiments involve lots of trailing cables with often five or more cables including: working electrode, reference electrode, counter electrode. grounding cable, sensing cable. The issue is the cabling of an electrochemical experiment can be complex, and errors can take place.

 

3) ISSUE THREE - Traditional electrochemical experiments demand solution volumes of 5 ml to 100 ml. This is a real issue in applications such as medicinal chemistry where the compounds are always scarce.

 

4) ISSUE FOUR - Electrochemists are often using aqueous solutions whilst chemists, organics chemists/synthetic chemists are often using organic solvents. The issue is that the materials used in traditional electrochemical experiments may not always be resistant to organic solvents.

 

Find out more about the Modern Approach to Organic Electroanalytical Chemistry on our website here. 

Gold screen printed electrodes and organic solvents

 

At Zimmer and Peacock we have electrodes for different applications, a SPE that may be good for one application may not work for another application. In this figure you can see the effect of chloroform on one of our electrodes, in this scenario we advise the users to use our gold SPE which are resistant to organic solvents.

Wearable Skin Sensors and understanding the Signal

 

The purpose of this note is to give a brief synopsis of some preliminary work performed at ZP for measuring the electrical properties of skin.

 

At Zimmer and Peacock we develop wearable biosensors for our clients and customers, including: lactate, glucose, potassium, sodium, hydration, perspiration/sweat.

 

In this note we have taken one of our off the shelf sensors and investigated them for measuring the conductivity of the skin, applications of such sensors can be used to monitor the surface of the skin or depending on the excitation signal we use we can penetrate into the skin and determine the conductivity below the top layer of skin.

 

The sensors we used for these conductivity based sensors are shown in this figure. You can find out more on our website here

Thu

28

Jun

2018

An alternative to traditional glass electrodes

Traditional glass pH electrodes have been around for decades, but there has been a question is it possible to get away from traditional glass electrodes and replace them with a technology that could provide the performance of a glass electrode but with the low cost fabrication of techniques such as screen-printing.

 

At Zimmer and Peacock we are striving to get pH sensors to 5 cents or less, and we are on the way to achieving this.

 

A recent analysis of pH sensors from a ZP manufactured pH sensor batch showed we are bringing mass produced low cost screen printed pH sensors to the market.

 

 


Wed

27

Jun

2018

Modern Organic Electrochemistry/Analytical Electrochemistry

Electrochemistry has a lot to offer the chemist, it can used :

 

1) As a reagent free method of oxidation/reduction in organic synthesis.

 

2) Electroanalytical chemistry can be used to rank a series of drugs in their  propensity to oxidation when considering their metabolic stability.

 

The issue with electrochemistry of the past was the electrochemical technology. Traditional electrochemical equipment was developed by electrochemists for use by electrochemists. A chemist who wishes to use electrochemical techniques is interested in the product of the experiment and not in the electrochemistry itself.

 

The problems with traditional electrochemistry have been:

 

1) ISSUE ONE - Large bulky potentiostats occupying too big a footprint on the bench space.

 

2) ISSUE TWO - Too many cables; traditional electrochemical experiments involve lots of trailing cables with often five or more cables including: working electrode, reference electrode, counter electrode. grounding cable, sensing cable. The issue is the cabling of an electrochemical experiment can be complex, and errors can take place.

 

3) ISSUE THREE - Traditional electrochemical experiments demand solution volumes of 5 ml to 100 ml. This is a real issue in applications such as medicinal chemistry where the compounds are always scarce.

 

4) ISSUE FOUR - Electrochemists are often using aqueous solutions whilst chemists, organics chemists/synthetic chemists are often using organic solvents. The issue is that the materials used in traditional electrochemical experiments may not always be resistant to organic solvents.


The Modern Approach to Organic Electroanalytical Chemistry.

Though Zimmer and Peacock are steeped in the traditions of electrochemistry our team have also had careers within the pharmaceutical industry, and so it is from this dual perspective that we provide the AnaPot for organo-electroanalytical chemistry.

 

The AnaPot solves all the ISSUES with traditional electrochemical technologies, including:

 

1) SOLUTION ISSUE ONE - The AnaPot is super lightweight and can be placed in the hand and carried around.

 

2) SOLUTION ISSUE TWO - With ZP there are not cables to the working electrode, counter electrode and reference electrodes.

 

3) SOLUTION ISSUE THREE - The technology from Zimmer and Peacock can  perform an electroanalytical analysis on 100 microliters or less of solution.

 

4) SOLUTION ISSUE FOUR - ZP has built the AnaPot with organic solvents in mind so the technologies are tested against aggressive solvents such as DMF etc.


Tue

26

Jun

2018

Gold screen printed electrodes and organic solvents

At Zimmer and Peacock we have electrodes for different applications, a SPE that may be good for one application may not work for another application. In this figure you can see the effect of chloroform on one of our electrodes, in this scenario we advise the users to use our gold SPE which are resistant to organic solvents.


Tue

26

Jun

2018

Wearable Skin Sensors and understanding the Signal

The purpose of this note is to give a brief synopsis of some preliminary work performed at ZP for measuring the electrical properties of skin.

At Zimmer and Peacock we develop wearable biosensors for our clients and customers, including: lactate, glucose, potassium, sodium, hydration, perspiration/sweat.

 

In this note we have taken one of our off the shelf sensors and investigated them for measuring the conductivity of the skin, applications of such sensors can be used to monitor the surface of the skin or depending on the excitation signal we use we can penetrate into the skin and determine the conductivity below the top layer of skin.

 

The sensors we used for these conductivity based sensors are shown in the adjacent figure.


Having decided which electrode to use one can choose to investigate the different layers of the skin through the  judicial use of frequency. In simplest terms the higher a frequency the more it penetrates into the skin.

 

For this investigation we used one of our off the shelf electrochemical impedance spectrometers.


At Zimmer and Peacock we investigated frequencies up to 1 MHz but the useful information really stopped at approximately 100 kHz. We were able to extract signal from the frequency spectrum by viewing it in the Bode Plot and the Nyquist Plot and using a modelling technique called Equivalent Circuits.


The actual data from the study of putting a ZP electrode on the skin is shown in the adjacent image; what we show is that the data obtained on the skin could be modelled with a simple equivalent circuit, but that was in fact a poor model for the skin and a better model was the Advanced Equivalent Circuit shown in the adjacent figure.


The adjacent image shows both data gathered on the skin and the circuit necessary to understand all the elements that contribute to the signal.


The experimental set-up is shown in the adjacent figure.

 

What was finally interesting was that we were able to get some interesting insight by moving the sensor around the body, which is shown in the adjacent image.


Fri

22

Jun

2018

Newsletter June 22

Welcome to this week's newsletter from Zimmer and Peacock. This newsletter is a mixture of news, stories and tech notes from Zimmer and Peacock. If you want to subscribe to our newsletter or have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock and our passion for biosensor technologies please don't hesitate to contact us.

Expensive probes replaced by screen-printed electrodes

 

Expensive probe sensors are used throughout industry, including  the water industry, food industry, pharmaceutical industry etc.

 

The issue with these probes is that they are often complex and therefore expensive to manufacture, and this expense means they cannot be used and discarded, but rather they have to be calibrated, used, decontaminated, recalibrated and re-used.

 

At Zimmer and Peacock we are helping clients, move away from traditional probes for total dissolved solids, pH etc by displacing  them with screen printed equivalent electrodes.

 

When manufactured at volumes these screen printed equivalent electrodes can be factory pre-calibrated, used once by the customer and immediately discarded. 

ZP sponsoring I3S - Taiwan

 

Zimmer and Peacock are sponsors and exhibitor at I3S 2018.

 

Zimmer and Peacock are contract developers and manufacturers of biosensors and bioelectronic devices and so we are delighted to participate in I3S 2018.

Bio-Inspired Magnetic Systems

 

Zimmer and Peacock will be speaking at the Bio-Inspired Magnetic Systems workshop 2018 at Exeter.

 

This thematic workshop focuses on the magnetically actuated and controlled microscopic systems enabling a range of actions at Low Reynolds number. From micro-robots and self-propelled swimmers to microfluidic and lab-on-a-chip technology, it will cover a range of topics which are of great interest in both fundamental and applied Physics. As well as world-leading experts in the field, including the confirmed invited speakers, the workshop aims at postgraduate and early careers researchers to maximise the exchange of knowledge and to provide a new platform for the development of new collaborations in this exciting scientific field.   

ZP in Miami

 

The ZP team and our scientific advisors were out and about in downtown Miami this week.

 

The guys were at the Biosensors Congress 2018, attending the lectures and presenting posters.

 

ZP is the world's leading contract biosensor development and manufacturing business, where we develop, manufacture and commercialize our clients' ideas.

Silver/Silver Chloride contamination of working electrode

 

If you are using screen printed electrodes, either made inhouse or from a third party you may find peaks near 0 V when you run a cyclic voltammogram. What you are seeing is the spillage/contamination of the working electrode by the ink/paste used to make your reference electrode.

 

If you have data that looks like that in the adjacent image then please contact Zimmer and Peacock for an explanation and  a fix.

Advanced Microfluidics - Biosensors Congress 2018

 

AMF joined ZP at their stand at the Biosensors Congress 2018 in Miami this week.

 

In the video we introduce their flagship product, a pump with a minimised dead-volume.

Pavel Zhurauski presenting a poster at Biosensors Congress 2018 Miami

 

This week part of the ZP team were in Miami at the Biosensors Congress 2018, where Pavel Zhurauski presented his work on biosensors. 

ZP's scientific advisor Erik Johannessen with us in Miami

 

This week part of the ZP team was in Miami with our scientific advisor Professor Erik Johannessen.

 

ZP was at the 2018 Biosensors Congress. This was a hectic week of science, technology and business.

Mon

18

Jun

2018

Expensive probes replaced by screen-printed electrodes

Expensive probe sensors are used throughout industry, including  the water industry, food industry, pharmaceutical industry etc.

 

The issue with these probes is that they are often complex and therefore expensive to manufacture, and this expense means they cannot be used and discarded, but rather they have to be calibrated, used, decontaminated, recalibrated and re-used.

 

At Zimmer and Peacock we are helping clients, move away from traditional probes for total dissolved solids, pH etc by displacing  them with screen printed equivalent electrodes.

 

When manufactured at volumes these screen printed equivalent electrodes can be factory pre-calibrated, used once by the customer and immediately discarded. 


Mon

18

Jun

2018

ZP sponsoring I3S - Taiwan

Zimmer and Peacock are sponsors and exhibitor at I3S 2018.

 

Zimmer and Peacock are contract developers and manufacturers of biosensors and bioelectronic devices and so we are delighted to participate in I3S 2018.

Sun

17

Jun

2018

Bio-Inspired Magnetic Systems

Zimmer and Peacock will be speaking at the Bio-Inspired Magnetic Systems workshop 2018 at Exeter.

This thematic workshop focuses on the magnetically actuated and controlled microscopic systems enabling a range of actions at Low Reynolds number. From micro-robots and self-propelled swimmers to microfluidic and lab-on-a-chip technology, it will cover a range of topics which are of great interest in both fundamental and applied Physics. As well as world-leading experts in the field, including the confirmed invited speakers, the workshop aims at postgraduate and early careers researchers to maximise the exchange of knowledge and to provide a new platform for the development of new collaborations in this exciting scientific field.   


Fri

15

Jun

2018

ZP in Miami

The ZP team and our scientific advisors were out and about in downtown Miami this week.

 

The guys were at the Biosensors Congress 2018, attending the lectures and presenting posters.

 

ZP is the world's leading contract biosensor development and manufacturing business, where we develop, manufacture and commercialize our clients' ideas.


Fri

15

Jun

2018

Silver/Silver Chloride contamination of working electrode

If you are using screen printed electrodes, either made inhouse or from a third party you may find peaks near 0 V when you run a cyclic voltammogram. What you are seeing is the spillage/contamination of the working electrode by the ink/paste used to make your reference electrode.

 

If you have data that looks like that in the adjacent image then please contact Zimmer and Peacock for an explanation and  a fix.


Fri

15

Jun

2018

Advanced Microfluidics - Biosensors Congress 2018

AMF joined ZP at their stand at the Biosensors Congress 2018 in Miami this week.

 

In the video we introduce their flagship product, a pump with a minimised dead-volume.


Fri

15

Jun

2018

Pavel Zhurauski presenting a poster at Biosensors Congress 2018 Miami

This week part of the ZP team were in Miami at the Biosensors Congress 2018, where Pavel Zhurauski presented his work on biosensors. 


Fri

15

Jun

2018

ZP's scientific advisor Erik Johannessen with us in Miami

This week part of the ZP team was in Miami with our scientific advisor Professor Erik Johannessen.

 

ZP was at the 2018 Biosensors Congress. This was a hectic week of science, technology and business.


Fri

15

Jun

2018

Newsletter June 15

Welcome to this week's newsletter from Zimmer and Peacock. This newsletter is a mixture of news, stories and tech notes from Zimmer and Peacock. If you want to subscribe to our newsletter or have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock and our passion for biosensor technologies please don't hesitate to contact us.

ZP on winning team at BCS Hackathon

 

Zimmer and Peacock were delighted to be on the winning team at the BSC Hackathon this week in Manchester.

 

We joined an amazing team put together on the day.

 

Starting with a great idea the team put together a technology and a business case for improving efficiency in the NHS.

www.zimmerpeacock.com 2018