News Feed

Below is the rolling news feed from Zimmer and Peacock. Our news feed represents that Zimmer and Peacock is a fast moving active company with lots of well-directed activity.

Click the button to access our main website.


Wed

24

Jul

2019

Resources for the Electrochemical Sciences

At Zimmer and Peacock we are focused on electrochemistry, both from the research perspective but also from the commercialisation perspective.

 

Below we have linked to resources on our website regarding electrochemistry be it:

 

1) Energy Conversion and Storage - Fuel Cells, Bio-fuel cells, Batteries and Flow Batteries, Electro-catalysis and Photo-electrocatalysis.

 

2) Photo-electrochemistry - Solar Cells, Perovskite, and alternative Solar Cells.

 

3) Corrosion - Marine Corrosion, Coatings, Paints, Polymers.

 

Please click the buttons below to access extra resources or contact us to ask specific questions


Mon

20

May

2019

Heavy Metal Detection

One of the keywords that describes us at Zimmer and Peacock is electrochemistry and so we approach the development of sensors and sensing from an electrochemist's perspective. That is why when people ask us can we provide or develop a sensors for heavy metal detection the answer is YES, but most importantly we also approach the answer form the perspective than for an electrochemist heavy metal detection is an 'easy' and well understood technology.

 

In the adjacent image we show the wave form and expected raw data from analysing a solution of heavy metals.

 

The technique that we recommend is anodic stripping which is an analytical technique that involves preconcentration of a metal onto an electrode surface followed by selective oxidation of each metal during an anodic potential sweep. 

Stripping analysis has the following properties: 

  1. Sensitive and reproducible (RSD<5%) method for trace metal ion analysis in aqueous media.
  2. Concentration limits of detection for many metals are in the low ppb to high ppt range (S/N=3) and this compares favourably with AAS or ICP analysis.
  3. Field deployable instrumentation that is inexpensive, approximately 12-15 metal ions can be analysed for by this method. 

The method is quantitative a the stripping peak currents and peak widths are a function of the metal concentration in solution.


In the buttons below we have linked to the instrument and electrodes for starting your development, if you have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock please don't hesitate to contact us.

 

 

Fri

03

May

2019

pH sensor stability and calibrating a pH sensor

At the time of writing this article we are not perfect at ZP as we would like our biosensors to be absolutely stable in all applications for all time, but we  like  the rest of the industry have not yet achieved this.

 

Though this note is written with the ZP pH sensors specifically in mind the equations/similar equations  and calibration strategies are applicable to many of our other potentiometric sensors including: nitrate, ammonium, phosphate, sodium, potassium, chloride  and calcium.  At the same time similar equations and calibration routines are applicable to our amperometric sensors: glucose, oxygen, lactate and nitric oxide sensors.

 

 

As stated above this note is specifically focused on pH sensors, and the problem that we are trying to solve is drift in pH sensors which are expected to be in continuous use for hours/days.

 

We have illustrated the problem in the adjacent figure, where a pH sensor is in a constant pH solution at a constant temperature and the signal is stable/perfect. The reality is that the signal can/does drift. In this note we explain the maths behind the senors and where the source of drift could be coming from and then calibration routines to counter the drift.


In the adjacent image we have started with an equation based on the Nernst Equation, Equation 1, and rearranged it to Equation 3. If we look at Equation 2 it says that the raw signal will be constant when pH, temperature, constant 1 constant 2 and constant 3 are all stable. What Equation 3 indicates is that to remove the influence of temperature from the signal either the analysis should be done at a controlled temperature or the sample temperature should be monitored. 

 

The reality with pH sensors is that constant 1, constant 2 and constant 3 are not stable, and so if you have wondered why there is always/often bottles of pH calibration solutions next to the lab pH meter it is because of the drifts in these constants; in the rest of the note we discuss re-calibration techniques.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ONE POINT CALIBRATION

 

If it is only the Constant 1 in Equation 3 that is drifting then a one point calibration is sufficient. What we mean by this is that a solution of known pH is placed in contact with the sensor and the Constant can be calculated from Equation 4. The now re-calculated constant can be put back into Equation 3 and the accuracy of the system improves and the drift in the raw signal will not be reflected in the displayed pH.  In the adjacent image we show raw data from a ZP pH sensor, the steps in the data reflect the changes in signal as the pH is changed from pH 2 to 9 and back again. It should be noted that the sigan is stable over 1600 seconds/30 minutes. We would therefore suggest that the ZP sensors are at least stable over 30 minutes and shouldn't require calibration in that time. Please note a one point calibration is most effective when measuring a sample that should be at a specific pH, for example pH 7.2. In this case one uses a calibration solution that is similar to the sample solution and is also buffered at pH 7.2

 

 

TWO POINT CALIBRATION

 

A one point calibration described above is fine if we assume that the drifting is due to the Constant 1 in Equation 2, but is due to the pH Sensitivity drifting  then we need to perform a two point calibration. In the embedded excel file opposite we have embedded the maths to do a two point calibration. To make the spreadsheet work, then the user/system needs to expose the sensor to a calibration solution at pH 4 and record the mV signal (the default in the spreadsheet is 150 mV), next the user/system needs to expose to pH 10 (the default in the spreadsheet is pH -60), from that the spreadsheet calculates the Constant 1 and the pH Sensitivity. These values can be placed back into Equation 4 and the overall system will then calculate the pH more accurately. Typical values used to calibrate a pH sensor are 4 and 10 but the best way to get an accurate calibration is to use calibration solutions whose pH values are reflective of the expected pH range of the solution.

 

 

HARDWARE SETUP FOR RECALIBRATION

In the adjacent image we show an example of a hardware setup that can be used for one point and two point calibration.

TEMPERATURE COMPENSATION

The topic we have not yet discussed in this note is temperature compensation, please note that this page is a live page and ZP are busy gathering the temperature characteristics of the pH sensor.


Mon

15

Apr

2019

Two important developments on the ZP sodium sensors

At ZP we are aware that we have 'too many' biosensors, and as the demands of our clients increase and as many approach the market then we have moved to improve the sensors. In this note we discuss that the sodium sensors have been improved in two important ways:

 

1) CHLORIDE RESILIENT - We now have a sodium sensor that is chloride resilient, what we meant by this is that the reference electrode does not change it's voltage as the chloride concentration changes.  In many blood, plasma and serum applications the chloride concentration is fairly fixed at around 150 mM and so the fact that the silver/silver chloride reference electrode is chloride sensitive doesn't matter, but in other fluids this is not the case. In the new sensor the reference electrode is  chloride resilient and so suitable for applications where chloride is variable or unknown

 

 


2) LONGER TERM STABILITY - In the adjacent image ZP has run two of its chloride resilient sodium sensors in 40 mM sodium solution for 64 hours. Both sensors kept within a 40 mV wide band. This would mean that the sensor was showing a change that was equivalent to going from 40mM to approximately 160 mM. Both sensors were on the same solution but were in fact run on separate instruments. This would make one think that something extrinsic to the sensor and the solutions was causing the solutions/sensior to change its apparent sodium concentration; an obvious parameter would be temperature. One would conclude that if we repeated the experiment but with temperature control then the apparent stability would be improved.

 

As we suspected that our data had been influenced by temperature we repeated the test but in a lab with a much better temperature control. The result was that after the initial setting time the signal was more stable so provides evidence that the sensor is temperature sensitive and so oen will either monitor or control the temperature when in use


Mon

15

Apr

2019

ZP Norway Workshop on Biosensor Development and Commercialization

Who should come?

Anyone who is interested in developing and commercialising sensors based on electrochemistry.

What will happen?

This will be a highly interactive course/workshop, people will be encouraged to interrupt and ask question as we go along, you will do real practicals in our labs, so it WILL NOT all be theoretical.

Workshop content?

Please click the button below to get a flavour of the course.

 

Price?

The workshop will be  750 Euros and does not include accomodation.

 

Accommodation?

Please click the link here to see the hotel in walking distance - link.

 

Location

The workshop will be held at our ZP - Norway site in Horten.

Time and Date

The workshop will be held on the 4 September 2019 from 10 AM to 5:30 PM.


Wed

06

Mar

2019

pH monitoring in bioreactors and cell culture

At ZP we are super interested in many  types of biosensors including pH sensor. At ZP we appreciate that pH sensors have not changed in 40 years, so at ZP we are leading the revolution in updating and upgrading pH sensors both for discreet and continuous  monitoring.

 

The technology at ZP offers pH sensors at a few cents per sensors when purchased and used in volume.

 

 

In this note we describe the continuous monitoring of the pH levels of the media within a bioreactor, specifically we have used E. coli DH5α which has been  cultured in lysogeny broth (LB) for 24-48 hours. During this time the sensor was

recording the potential/pH of the solution by OCP. The sensor was tested for pH sensitivity using the standard pH4, pH7 and pH10 reference solutions at 10 minute intervals both before and after the microbiological test to firstly ensure that the sensor was pH sensitive before the test began, and secondly to assess what impact (if any) the exposure to the

bacterial solution had upon the sensors pH sensitive properties.


Wed

20

Feb

2019

Choosing inks for screen printed electrodes

INTRODUCTION

At Zimmer and Peacock we are pragmatists, which means we will choose the best materials for the particular application.  When manufacturing a screen printed electrode the choice of ink can be critical or not depending on what the ink will be used for.  When it comes to sensors and  assays developed on screen printed

 

In this note we discuss a comparison between two carbon inks from two different suppliers. When choosing an ink there are generally two categories of properties that are that .are considered and one that is overlooked, these are: printability, electrical properties and electrochemical properties.

 

The printability/rheological properties of an ink and paste are of course in the datasheet of the vendors, and similarly the electrical properties of the ink appear on the datasheets. What is not so much discussed is the electrochemical properties of the ink.  Whether the electrochemical properties are important then depends on what kind of assay is being run, whether is is an impedance, amperometric, voltammetric or potentiometric assay.  There are no definitive rules, but one could argue that electrochemical properties are important when the assay is voltammetric in nature. If the assay is potentiometric for example then the electrochemical properties are less important.  We illustrate this within this article.


We tested two inks from two vendors which were both described as carbon inks: INKS A and INKS B. We were able to print both inks, and when measuring the resistance both had similar conductivity.  

WAFER MAPPING

Once the inks were printed ZP used its wafer mapping technology to assess electrodes fabricated from A and B.


ELECTROCHEMICAL TESTING

Both inks were tested for their electrochemical behavior, and whilst Ink B gave reasonable peaks, ink A did not give the expected electrochemical behavior.


FUNCTIONAL TESTING

Having determined that the electrodes were electrochemically different we could clearly say that for a voltammetric assay ink B performed better than ink A. We then tested both as amperometric and potentiometric sensors. Following these tests we could argue that both ink A and ink B were able to be used in the amperometric and potentiometric inks.


WHY ARE THE INKS DIFFERENT

In the adjacent image we show the route cause of while both inks are conductive one is better for voltammetric assays; the root cause is the ratio of organic binders to metal/metalloid on the surface. Higher the ratio of organic binder to metal/metalloid then the higher the resistance and therefore the more distorted the voltammetry .


Sun

10

Feb

2019

ZP Wearables Munich

ZP knows that one of the futures for the garment and sportswear industry are wearable biosensors. All the easy parameters such as ECG, pulse, temperature have been measure, BUT at ZP we are tackling the hard parameters, including: lactate, glucose, hydration, pH, sodium, potassium in a wearable format.

 

Our mission at ZP is to accelerate the time it takes get smart wearable biosensors to market.

 

ZP is a super friendly company so please don't hesitate to contact us.


Sun

10

Feb

2019

Manufacturer of Screen Printed Electrodes

OVERVIEW

At Zimmer and Peacock we carry our contract development and manufacturing of electrodes, sensors and biosensors. ZP is different in that we understand and can perform the entire workflow from: printing to functionalizing, to addition of microfluidics to final calibration of batches.

 

In this article we expand upon this and describe some ways of getting to market quicker.


MANUFACTURING ELECTRODES 

The issue with any custom manufacturing is that great manufacturing accuracy and precision comes with manufacturing volume, and in the same way low cost and high yield also comes with manufacturing volume. What we mean by this is  'the more you make something, the better you are at it'.

 

If we take the example of custom screen printed electrodes we receive a lot of requests for custom screen printed electrodes, but  when we look at the designs you discover that they are all fairly similar. At ZP we have both standard electrodes and we also provide custom manufacturing services.

 

The benefit of using a ZP standard product, particular our value electrode range, is that they are already a high volume manufacture piece has gone through the wafer mapping process. The advantage to our customers, clients and collaborators is that they can purchase just two electrodes to try out, or thousands of electrodes which have already been functionally tested.


FUNCTIONALIZING ELECTRODES

Zimmer and Peacock is unusual in that we can both manufacture electrodes but we can also functionalize the  electrodes to make them specific; the materials we are used to handling include: aptamers, ionophores, enzymes, DNA antibodies, antigens etc. Zimmer and Peacock has a number or pre-existing sensors and biosensors which can accelerate the time to get to market.


TESTING

At Zimmer and Peacock we are often asked to do custom/contract manufacturing of screen printed electrodes.  At Zimmer and Peacock we take a more holistic approach to the screen printing of electrodes for sensor and biosensor applications.

 

Electrodes on the R and D market are often shipped functionally untested, what this means is that the electrodes are visually inspected but appearance is not a god assessment on how an electrode will function as  a biosensor. ZP is different in that we are able to electrochemically functionally test electrodes and sensors before shipping; at ZP we call this process wafer mapping.

CALIBRATION

ZP can also functionally test electrodes/sensors and so assign calibration factors to the electrodes/sensors so that the performance of the sensor in the hands of the final user is the most precise and accurate it can be.

the calibration factors can be transmitted using technologies such as RFID or QR codes.


MICROFLUIDICS

Self filling/capillary filling is a feature common on glucose electrochemical sensors/strips; at ZP are able to provide this technology either as a custom part or as a standard product; again the use of the standard product reduces tiem and the cost to our collaborators.


If you have any questions regarding ZP please don't hesitate to contact us.

Sat

09

Feb

2019

ZP @ Lab-on-a-Chip 2019 San Diego

ZP will be exhibiting at Lab-on-a-Chip 2019 at San Diego come and see us there.


Sat

09

Feb

2019

ZP @ 71 st AACC 2019 Anaheim CA

ZP will be exhibiting at the AACC in Anaheim, please come and see us there at both 1299.


Sat

09

Feb

2019

ZP @ Sensors 2019 San Jose

ZP will be exhibiting at Sensors 2019 in San Jose, please come and see us there.


Sat

09

Feb

2019

ZP will be at MDDI in Boston 2019

ZP will be exhibiting at MDDI Boston.


Sat

09

Feb

2019

ZP @IFT19 New Orleans

Come and meet ZP at the IFT in New Orleans, we will be exhibiting.


Sat

09

Feb

2019

ZP at ASTA Naples Florida

Zimmer and Peacock will be attending the ASTA conference in Naples Florida, come and see us there.


Sat

09

Feb

2019

Meet ZP at Tri-Con San Francisco in March

Zimmer and Peacock will be exhibiting for the third time in a row at Tri-Con this year. Please come and meet us there.

 

Fri

04

Jan

2019

Newsletter January 4th

Welcome to this week's newsletter from Zimmer and Peacock. This newsletter is a mixture of news, stories and tech notes from Zimmer and Peacock. If you want to subscribe to our newsletter or have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock and our passion for biosensor technologies please don't hesitate to contact us.

ZP – Bio-sensing Technology Malaysia

 

Zimmer and Peacock is exhibiting at Bio-Sensing Technology in Kuala Lumpa Malaysia 2019.

 

About the conference – 

Bio-sensing technologies are of growing importance in healthcare, agri-food, environmental and security sectors, and this is reflected in the continued growth of global markets for such technologies. Connectivity with the wider-world through the internet and the demand for data to drive big-data applications are other important drivers of bios-sensing technology development. This conference will provide a forum for accessing the most up-to-date and authoritative knowledge from both commercial and academic worlds, sharing best practice in the field as well as learning about case studies of successfully integrated bio-sensing technologies.

 

This year the conference will have one theme dedicated to bio-sensing technology for the internet-of-things and a post conference meeting with a particular focus on applications addressing challenges in telehealth and diagnostic. 

ZP launches new website for 2019.

 

Zimmer and Peacock has undergone substantial growth in 2018 and in preparation for further growth in 2019 we have launched our new website.

Using field data to refine and finish your sensor biosensor and medical diagnostic

 

ZP is a world leading contract developer of sensors, biosensors and IVDs. In this note we discuss a strategy ZP can use on your programs to accelerate the time it takes to get to to market. The strategy discussed on our website here works in a number of businesses and technical scenarios, including where the strategy is to perform a 510 K submission.

How to characterise a continuous glucose measuring sensor

 

At Zimmer and Peacock we have a number of biosensors suitable or adaptable for continuous monitoring, including: continuous glucose monitoring (CGM), continuous lactate monitoring (CLM), potassium monitoring, sodium monitoring, sweat monitoring and hydration monitoring. 

 

In these notes on our website we start a discussion on how ZP characterises such sensors, we specifically use the example of glucose, though the technique can be extended to other analytes.

Sun

30

Dec

2018

Using field data to refine/finish your sensor. biosensor and medical diagnostic

ZP is a world leading contract developer of sensors, biosensors and IVDs. In this note we discuss a strategy ZP can use on your programs to accelerate the time it takes to get to to market.. The strategy discussed  works in a number of businesses and technical  scenarios, including where the strategy is to perform a 510 K submission.

 

The traditional way of developing a sensor, biosensor or IVD is to spend several years developing the sensors and then going into the field and/or clinical setting and starting testing on real samples. This is a sequential effort and means  that too much time is spent tuning the assay on samples that are not representative of the the real world samples. In addition the methods used to extract the signal from the raw data are often highly manual with many teams recycling techniques used in the past. For example glucose signals are often measured by using chronoamperometry and chronocoulometry, but this ignores the plethora of other techniques available to the development team.  Further with the slow traditional strategy it ignore the simple fact that investors give a company a higher valuation if it has data on real samples; therefore at ZP we think it is important to get to real sample data ASAP, and rather than sequentially building the sensor technology and then gathering real world data, the two efforts should be in parallel and/or overlapping.

 

At ZP we rapidly move you to real world samples, using a three phase approach.  The advantage that the signal extraction algorithm is tuned on real sampes, whilst also gather real world sample data, the phases are::

 

1) PHASE ONE - ZP develops your proof-of-principle assay on our pre-existing electrodes and our AnaPot electronics; upon completion of a proof-of-principle study we can translate the results onto a some hundreds/thousands of functionalized electrodes and start testing with real samples.

 

2) PHASE TWO - ZP and you perform some initial test with real samples to ensure that the new diagnostic/sensor is approximately working.

 

3) PHASE THREE - This is a preclinical study on some hundreds of real samples. This PHASE THREE involves two parts:

  • 3A - TRAINING PHASE
  • 3B - TESTING PHASE

For this strategy to work we do need three pieces in place, these are: 

 

ONE - There is an existing 'gold standard'/predicative device or assay available. 

 

TWO - Ideally ZP should have developed or supplied your initial sensors and  electronics; the reasons why this is important is that we will programme the electronics to analyse the sample with several electrochemical waveforms. The strategy is based on the fact that there are multiple ways of extracting an electrochemical signal for an analyte,  and so to maximise the effectiveness of the Training Phase we will over analyse the sample with multiple techniques and gather all the data. The more data we gather than the higher the probability of success when we mine the data for the analyte signal later.

 

 

THREE - We will require authentic real world samples , be it urine, blood, red wine etc. The samples should  cover a range of analyte concentrations, with the analyte of interest being present in the samples from a  low concentration through to a high concentrations.

3A - TRAINING PHASE

 

As discussed above ZP collects data on hundreds of real world samples using both the new technology and the predicative technology, subsequently we split the data randomly into a training data set and a test data set.

 

With the training set of data we use the ZP Signal Extraction Loop Training Phase Strategy for developing the calibration/extraction algorithm for your device.The output from the training phase is an algorithm to extract the analyte signal from the raw data.

OPTIMIZING THE SIGNAL EXTRACTION ALGORITHM

As discussed above the technology provided by ZP will over analyse the samples so that we can extensively mine the raw data. The strategy is to develop a signal extraction algorithm which leads to a  minimum error between the new diagnostic and the existing/predictive diagnostic.

 

The ZP signal extraction algorithm will automatically loop/iterate until the error betwen the existing/predicative device and the new device is minimised, see adjacent figure.


3B - TESTING PHASE

 

 As discussed above, he data for the testing phase was in fact collected during the training phase, but now the signal extraction algorithm developed in the training phase is used to extract the signal form the test data set, and a Deming regression analysis performed to ensure equivalence between the predicative assay and the new assay.

 

If you have any questions regarding how ZP can help in the development and manufacturing of your sensor, biosensor IVD, please don't hesitate to contact us.


Sun

30

Dec

2018

How to characterise a continuous glucose measuring sensor

At Zimmer and Peacock we have a number of biosensors suitable or adaptable for continuous monitoring, including: continuous glucose monitoring (CGM), continuous lactate monitoring (CLM), potassium monitoring, sodium monitoring, sweat monitoring and hydration monitoring. 

 

In the notes below we start a discussion on how ZP characterises such sensors, we specifically use the example of glucose, though the technique can be extended to other analytes.

RAW DATA

In the adjacent image a ZP CGM sensor is tested over a range of glucose concentrations.

 

In this example of raw data from a CGM we can we how the current increases with glucose concentration.

 


CONVERTING RAW DATA TO INFORMATION

Our raw data from the image above can be converted into information in the first instance by plotting signal versus concentration; we have illustrated this in the adjacent figure;  we have analysed the signal at each glucose concentration and made a calibration curve with a linear fit.

c0 = base line

c1 = gradient/sensitivity.

 


SENSOR DRIFT

The question with any sensor that is to be used for continuous monitoring is 'how much does the sensor drift?'

 

In the adjacent image a sensors was tested over several days and the raw signal is plotted against the glucose solution used to test the CGM.

 

In this theoretical example the sensors has lost approximately 35 % over the test time; there are two potential solutions in this scenario:

 

ONE - Reformulate the sensor so it is stable.

TWO - Have a periodic calibration routine with a known concentration in a  calibration solution and adjust the sensors calibration factors.


CONVERTING RAW SIGNAL TO INFORMATION

 

In the sensor drift data above for a theoretical CGM sensor there are two parameters, that  can drift with time, the baseline and the sensitivity, the volume of raw data can be reduced to two parameters which can quantify the overall sensors drift by calculating the baseline drift and sensitivity drift.


Zimmer and Peacock are  world leading contract developer and manufacturer of sensor, biosensors with a wide range of application experience including continuous glucose monitoring (CGM), if you have any questions please don't hesitate to contact us.


Sat

29

Dec

2018

RFID Tags and Biosensors - Manufacturing sensors

It can take millions of dollars of money and effort to lock-down the manufacturing of biosensors and medical diagnostics. Therefore, you must have some out of the box thinking to be able to get your initial biosensor product ready for market and on the shelves. 

At ZP we work to make the biosensors and manufacturing as good as they can be, but we also use supporting technology like RFID tags to carry important data about the sensors into the field. RFID tag technology allows the manufacture test data to be carried with the sensor out into the final application, the result is an overall sensor performance that is superior to just the manufactured sensor product.

At ZP we perform a lot of testing and characterization during the manufacturing process and this data can influence the sensitivity and performance of the final product.

ZP is the only contract biosensors and medical diagnostic company able to send deliver biosensors with individual calibration factors for maximum infield performance.


Fri

28

Dec

2018

Newsletter December 28

Welcome to this week's newsletter from Zimmer and Peacock. This newsletter is a mixture of news, stories and tech notes from Zimmer and Peacock. If you want to subscribe to our newsletter or have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock and our passion for biosensor technologies please don't hesitate to contact us.

ZP - Sponsers BioEl 2019

 

Zimmer and Peacock is a world leading contract biosensor and medical diagnostics company, and so we are delighted to sponsor the 6th International Winterschool on Bioelectronics.

 

 

About the workshop.

The integration of electronics with the biological world can be achieved by platforms using bio-inspired materials as well as strategies. Such bio-compatible electronics have the potential to transform current paradigms in green information technology and biomedical research. Realization of biodegradable or biocompatible, low-cost, large-volume materials and devices will contribute to sustainability in plastic "consumable" electronics. Biomaterials-based electronics with biomimetic interfaces can be utilized in medical technologies that require accurate sensing and stimulation of biological matter. 

This will be a forum to bring together both veteran and young researchers to learn and discuss emerging topics in the field of bioelectronics. Topics include: 

 

•    Electronic/ionic signal transduction

•    Conducting polymers in biochemistry and biomedicine

•    Electronics based on biomaterials

•    Optoelectronics at the interface with biology

•    Electroceuticals

•    Devices for electronic sensing of bioanalytes, and electronically-mediated drug delivery

•    Iontronics, protonics

•    Electronic interfaces with biochemistry

•    Artificial skin

•    Artificial retina

•    Consideration of conduction in biomaterials, i.e. melanin, DNA, etc.

•    Nature-inspired materials for energy harvesting applications

•    Implantable electronics

•    Nanoinjection, structured material interfaces with cells

•    Biocompatible inorganic semiconductors and devices

•    Neural Interface

•    Clinical applications

•    Plant electronics / bionics

•    Tissue Engineering

 

ZP - Christmas Party 2018

 

Zimmer and Peacock has had a record breaking 2018 and the team is really looking forward to 2019.

 

Please don't hesitate to contact us with all your biosensors and medical diagnostic development and manufacturing needs.

Fri

21

Dec

2018

ZP - Sponsers BioEl 2019

Zimmer and Peacock is a world leading contract biosensor and medical diagnostics company, and so we are delighted to sponsor the 6th International Winterschool on Bioelectronics.

About the workshop.

The integration of electronics with the biological world can be achieved by platforms using bio-inspired materials as well as strategies. Such bio-compatible electronics have the potential to transform current paradigms in green information technology and biomedical research. Realization of biodegradable or biocompatible, low-cost, large-volume materials and devices will contribute to sustainability in plastic "consumable" electronics. Biomaterials-based electronics with biomimetic interfaces can be utilized in medical technologies that require accurate sensing and stimulation of biological matter. 

This will be a forum to bring together both veteran and young researchers to learn and discuss emerging topics in the field of bioelectronics. Topics include: 

 

•    Electronic/ionic signal transduction

•    Conducting polymers in biochemistry and biomedicine

•    Electronics based on biomaterials

•    Optoelectronics at the interface with biology

•    Electroceuticals

•    Devices for electronic sensing of bioanalytes, and electronically-mediated drug delivery

•    Iontronics, protonics

•    Electronic interfaces with biochemistry

•    Artificial skin

•    Artificial retina

•    Consideration of conduction in biomaterials, i.e. melanin, DNA, etc.

•    Nature-inspired materials for energy harvesting applications

•    Implantable electronics

•    Nanoinjection, structured material interfaces with cells

•    Biocompatible inorganic semiconductors and devices

•    Neural Interface

•    Clinical applications

•    Plant electronics / bionics

•    Tissue Engineering

Fri

21

Dec

2018

ZP - Christmas Party 2018

Zimmer and Peacock has had a record breaking 2018, and so the team is really looking forward to 2019.

 

Please don't hesitate to contact us with all your biosensors and medical diagnostic development and manufacturing needs.


Fri

21

Dec

2018

Newsletter December 21

Welcome to this week's newsletter from Zimmer and Peacock. This newsletter is a mixture of news, stories and tech notes from Zimmer and Peacock. If you want to subscribe to our newsletter or have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock and our passion for biosensor technologies please don't hesitate to contact us.

There's more than one way to measure pH

 

What's wrong with some of the methods of measuring pH? At ZP we recently discovered the answer to this question whilst working on a novel application, and the answer is that potentiometric measurements using oxide based sensors can take some time to reach equilibrium, When we say 'some time' we specifically mean 200 seconds, which may not sound like a lot, but if you want or need to know the pH of a sample within 30 seconds then 200 seconds is too long.

 

At ZP we have a different attitude to problems, as we seem them as opportunities and so when faced with a challenge of needing a fast to respond pH sensor, we changed the mode of operation and the chemistry of detection; what we created was a ZP voltammetric pH sensor which was able to measure pH within 30 seconds.

Electrochemistry - The perfect bridge between chemistry/biology and engineering

 

Scientists in the lab, be it biologists and chemists, love to measure their molecules and assays by optical spectroscopy method, be it: UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy, infrared, surface plasmon resonance, fluorescence etc.

 

The fundamental issue with these lab techniques is that don't always translate when you need to make real world sensors and assays, especially where parameters such as low cost, quantification etc come into play. 

 

If we take a lesson from history we should consider the home glucose test used by diabetics.  When these products first came to market they were optical assays, but were quickly  replaced by electrochemical assays. 

 

Why were the first glucose home use meters optical? The answer is because the scientists and engineers developing them were used to optical assays, and so they of course they went  with what they knew.  The issue is that an optically based assay often requires a sample with a high transparency; but high transparency is an immediate issue when you are trying to analyse real-world  samples such as whole blood. When people discovered that they could get a glucose signal in whole blood using screen printed electronics/electrodes the market very quickly moved over to electrochemistry. This move from optical assays to electrochemistry by the glucose detection market was not because the scientists and engineers loved electrochemistry, but it was because it offered a much lower cost detection strategy with a lot less sample workup.

 

Find out more on our website here

ZP - exhibiting ECEE 2019

 

ZP is delighted to be exhibiting alongside Zahner at ECEE in glasgow.

 

The Electrochemical Conference on Energy and the Environment (ECEE 2019): Bioelectrochemistry and Energy Storage will be held in Glasgow, Scotland from July 21-26, 2019 at the Scottish Events Campus (SEC). This international meeting will focus on the following areas:

 

Lithium-ion Batteries: From the Design of New Electrode Materials and Electrolytes to the Performance and Recycling of Industrial Systems

In Situ and Operando Characterization of Energy Storage Systems

Mass and Charge Transfer Across Electrochemical Interfaces

From Qualitative Models to Quantitative Predictions

Alternative Battery Chemistries and High-power Devices

Metal Anodes Meet Solid Electrolytes

Enzymatic Bioelectrochemistry

Microbial Bioelectrochemistry

Bio-inspired Electrocatalysis

ZP - South Africa

 

Zimmer and Peacock is located in the USA, Norway and the United Kingdom, but our perspective is global and so this week we were in South Africa delivering our biosensor, sensor and medical diagnostic technologies to partners there.

ZP - Testing the pungency of garlic

 

Zimmer and Peacock have been busy going on site and testing garlic products with our garlic sensors.

Thu

20

Dec

2018

There's more than one way to measure pH

What's wrong with some of the methods of measuring pH? At ZP we recently discovered the answer to this question whilst working on a novel application, and the answer is that potentiometric measurements using oxide based sensors can take some time to reach equilibrium, When we say 'some time' we specifically mean 200 seconds, which may not sound like a lot, but if you want or need to know the pH of a sample within 30 seconds then 200 seconds is too long.

 

At ZP we have a different attitude to problems, as we seem them as opportunities and so when faced with a challenge of needing a fast to respond pH sensor, we changed the mode of operation and the chemistry of detection; what we created was a ZP voltammetric pH sensor which was able to measure pH within 30 seconds.


Thu

20

Dec

2018

Electrochemistry - The perfect bridge between chemistry/biology and engineering

Scientists in the lab, be it biologists and chemists, love to measure their molecules and assays by optical spectroscopy method, be it: UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy, infrared, surface plasmon resonance, fluorescence etc.

 

The fundamental issue with these lab techniques is that don't always translate when you need to make real world sensors and assays, especially where parameters such as low cost, quantification etc come into play. 

 

If we take a lesson from history we should consider the home glucose test used by diabetics.  When these products first came to market they were optical assays, but were quickly  replaced by electrochemical assays. 

 

Why were the first glucose home use meters optical? The answer is because the scientists and engineers developing them were used to optical assays, and so they of course they went  with what they knew.  The issue is that an optically based assay often requires a sample with a high transparency; but high transparency is an immediate issue when you are trying to analyse real-world  samples such as whole blood. When people discovered that they could get a glucose signal in whole blood using screen printed electronics/electrodes the market very quickly moved over to electrochemistry. This move from optical assays to electrochemistry by the glucose detection market was not because the scientists and engineers loved electrochemistry, but it was because it offered a much lower cost detection strategy with a lot less sample workup.

What is not widely appreciated is if you can record a spectrum such as a UV-VIS spectrum then you are almost guaranteed to be able to obtain an equivalent electrochemical voltammetry spectrum. For example if you have a molecule of interest and you can measure the UV-VIS spectrum, then you can record the equivalent electrochemical spectrum, this is shown in the adjacent image.


The existence of an electrochemical spectrum for every optical spectrum, in ZP's experience, is universally true, we show another example in the adjacent image.


If developing low cost real-world solutions at the right price  is important to you then, there is a fundamental/quantum reason when electrochemistry 'beats' optical techniques and it comes down to whether it is easier to measure an electron or a photon. An electron has mass and charge, whilst a photon has no mass and no charge. Any electronics engineer can measure electrons, it is called electrical current, but it takes more effort to measure something with no mass or charge, such as a photon. This quantum difference between a photon and an electron means that the electronics needed to measure an optical system are more expensive than the electron system.

 

As discussed an optical system often requires transparent clean sample, free from chunks and lumps, but also an optical system also requires shielding from the ambient light. We are surrounded by light and so special measures have to be taken to shield the sample from the light. If we return to the example of the glucose strip for diabetes, there is no shielding of the assay in place, and this is because electrochemistry doesn't 'care about' light. This reduces the cost of electrochemical products as the engineers don't have to design special shielding for the assay.

Zimmer and Peacock is a unique company in that we have a full range of analytical techniques from UV-Vis spectrometers, UV-VIS-HPLC, plate readers, potentiostats etc, and so we are very used to developing and validating assays using the spectrum of analytical techniques.  If you have any questions regarding this article please don't hesitate to contact us.

 

 

Mon

17

Dec

2018

ZP - exhibiting ECEE 2019

ZP is delighted to be exhibiting alongside Zahner at ECEE in glasgow.

 

The Electrochemical Conference on Energy and the Environment (ECEE 2019): Bioelectrochemistry and Energy Storage will be held in Glasgow, Scotland from July 21-26, 2019 at the Scottish Events Campus (SEC). This international meeting will focus on the following areas:

 

  • Lithium-ion Batteries: From the Design of New Electrode Materials and Electrolytes to the Performance and Recycling of Industrial Systems
  • In Situ and Operando Characterization of Energy Storage Systems
  • Mass and Charge Transfer Across Electrochemical Interfaces
  • From Qualitative Models to Quantitative Predictions
  • Alternative Battery Chemistries and High-power Devices
  • Metal Anodes Meet Solid Electrolytes
  • Enzymatic Bioelectrochemistry
  • Microbial Bioelectrochemistry
  • Bio-inspired Electrocatalysis

 


Mon

17

Dec

2018

ZP - South Africa

Zimmer and Peacock is located in the USA, Norway and the United Kingdom, but our perspective is global and so this week we were in South Africa delivering our biosensor, sensor and medical diagnostic technologies to partners there.


Mon

17

Dec

2018

ZP - Testing the pungency of garlic

Zimmer and Peacock have been busy going on site and testing garlic products with our garlic sensors.


Fri

14

Dec

2018

Newsletter December 14

Welcome to this week's newsletter from Zimmer and Peacock. This newsletter is a mixture of news, stories and tech notes from Zimmer and Peacock. If you want to subscribe to our newsletter or have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock and our passion for biosensor technologies please don't hesitate to contact us.

Chilli Sauces tested in production on ZP Chilli Sensors

 

ZP is delighted that many of our clients are now using the ZP ChilliPot to test their products as part of the QC in production.

ZP - fixing problems with sensors and biosensors

 

THE PROBLEM

At Zimmer and Peacock we develop electrochemical sensors, biosensors and medical diagnostics;  something that is rarely mentioned both in the academic or industrial setting is the reference electrode. Often the reference electrode is silver/silver chloride, but the term not often used but which should be accurately applied is pseudo reference electrode.

 

What this means is that the reference electrode is only a reference electrode under certain conditions  of stable chloride concentration.  In many applications chloride can be considered to be stable and repeatable, for example the chloride concentration in blood, plasma, serum, interstitial fluid etc the chloride concentration is around 135 to 150 mM. In other applications such as urine analysis, water testing, food testing etc, the chloride concentration maybe unknown and maybe a variable. The issue  is that a silver/silver chloride reference electrode has a potential that is effected by the sample's chloride concentration,  this is shown in the image below.

 

The effect of having a pseudo reference electrode is that sensors based on amperometry potentiometry, voltammetry, etc many not function as expected if the chloride concentration is unknown and variable. Read our solution on our website here

How to collect sweat for on skin analysis?

 

Zimmer and Peacock has the world's only off-the-shelf platform for analysing sweat, be it glucose, lactate, sodium, oxygen, chloride or pH. In the adjacent video we show you a configuration for collecting sweat and moving the sweat over a sensor.

ZP BioMed Devices 2018 San Jose

 

Thank you for talking to us at BioMed Devices San Jose 2018.

 

At the conference we spoke about sensors for potassium, sodium, pH, glucose, lactate, oxygen, etc.

 

We talked about wearable sensors and detecting analytes in urine, plasma, sweat and blood.

 

If you have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock please don't hesitate to contact us.

Mon

10

Dec

2018

Chilli Sauces tested in production on ZP Chilli Sensors

ZP is delighted that many of our clients are now using the ZP ChilliPot to test their products as part of the QC in production.


Sun

09

Dec

2018

ZP - fixing problems with sensors and biosensors

THE PROBLEM

At Zimmer and Peacock we develop electrochemical sensors, biosensors and medical diagnostics;  something that is rarely mentioned both in the academic or industrial setting is the reference electrode. Often the reference electrode is silver/silver chloride, but the term not often used but which should be accurately applied is pseudo reference electrode.

 

What this means is that the reference electrode is only a reference electrode under certain conditions  of stable chloride concentration.  In many applications chloride can be considered to be stable and repeatable, for example the chloride concentration in blood, plasma, serum, interstitial fluid etc the chloride concentration is around 135 to 150 mM. In other applications such as urine analysis, water testing, food testing etc, the chloride concentration maybe unknown and maybe a variable. The issue  is that a silver/silver chloride reference electrode has a potential that is effected by the sample's chloride concentration,  this is shown in the adjacent image.

 

The effect of having a pseudo reference electrode is that sensors based on amperometry potentiometry, voltammetry, etc many not function as expected if the chloride concentration is unknown and variable.


THE SOLUTION

ZP has developed a reference electrode that it can apply to its standard products that is insensitive to changes in chloride concentration, please see adjacent image.


Sat

08

Dec

2018

How to collect sweat for on skin analysis?

Zimmer and Peacock has the world's only off-the-shelf platform for analysing sweat, be it glucose, lactate, sodium, oxygen, chloride or pH. In the adjacent video we show you a configuration for collecting sweat and moving the sweat over a sensor.


Sat

08

Dec

2018

ZP BioMed Devices 2018 San Jose

Thank you for talking to us at BioMed Devices San Jose 2018.

 

At the conference we spoke about sensors for potassium, sodium, pH, glucose, lactate, oxygen, etc.

 

We talked about wearable sensors and detecting analytes in urine, plasma, sweat and blood.

 

 

If you have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock please don't hesitate to contact us.


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Fri

07

Dec

2018

Newsletter December 7

Welcome to this week's newsletter from Zimmer and Peacock. This newsletter is a mixture of news, stories and tech notes from Zimmer and Peacock. If you want to subscribe to our newsletter or have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock and our passion for biosensor technologies please don't hesitate to contact us.

ZP develops chloride sensor

 

At Zimmer we believe that ion sensors including sodium, potassium and pH are important sensors which is why we are delighted to expand our range with a chloride sensor.

Anatomy of a ZP Sensor

 

This picture is the front side and back side of a ZP sensor, when using these sensors it is important that the connector you use does not cause a short between the front side and backside. If you are planning to use these sensors in a potentiometric mode you of course need to make electrical connection with the working/sense electrode, you can then choose to use the reference or counter electrodes as your reference or short the counter and reference together and have them combined as the reference electrode.

Questions about Zahner

 

At Zimmer and Peacock we are here to help our clients and customers. This week we had an enquiry about the EIS and potentiostats of Zahner that ZP distributes in the Nordics and UK.

 

In the short post below we have answered some of the recent questions we received. 

 

1. The Zahner system can be controlled by windows7/8/10-PC, though the Win10 machine is not supplied';this means that if you have a Win10 machine you can run the software.

 

2. Some of the Zahner potentiostats are advertised as having Controlled voltage: ±15 V / ±5 V, what this means is that you can choose to operate the instrument  at ±15 V or ±5 V; you will use the ±5 V voltage often in  applications like the Gratzel cell etc, whilst you will use the ±15 V setting in power applications like batteries and fuel cells. Switching between ±15 V or ±5 V is an option in the software.

 

3.What is the difference between the compliance voltage and the controlled voltage? Often in an electrochemical cell we will have the working electrode, the counter electrode and the reference electrode. The electrochemist is often interested in controlling the voltage at the working electrode (called controlled voltage), but what we as electrochemists sometimes over look is that the potentiostat then applies another voltage to the cell at the counter electrode called the compliance voltage. The reason that the potentiostat applies this compliance voltage at the counter electrode is because the rate of reaction at the counter electrode needs to be as fast as the rate of reaction/current at the working electrode. So in summary the controlled voltage is what we apply at working electrode, whilst the compliance voltage is what the potentiostat applies to the counter electrode to ensure the rate of reaction at the working electrode is as fast as it need to be.

 

4. Zahner instruments come with extra slots for additional hardware modules, these slots can be used for additonal cards like the TEMP/U and the PAD4. For example the TEMP/U allows for the measurement of parameters such as pH, temperature etc within the electrochemical cell, whilst teh PAD4 is often used to measure 4 electrochemical cells that are in a battery or fuel cell stack.

 

5.The PAD4 is useful in applications where you have for example a series of electrochemical cells stacked together to form a battery. The Zahner potentiostat would allow you to measure the impedance across the entire battery, but if you want to know how individual cells within the batter are performing you can use the PAD4 to measure up to 4 cells within the stack, of course the more PAD4 cards you use the more cells within a stack you can measure.

 

6 The PP211 is often supplied with Zahner CIMPS systems, this is because the Zahner CIMPS system has a light source and the P211 is the 'power supply  to that light source.

ZP patrocina Congreso Colombiabo de Electroquimic

 

ZP se presenta como uno de los patrocinadores del Congreso Columbiano de Electroquímica.

 

ZP es uno de los líderes mundiales en tecnología para electroquímicos: electrodos impresos, potenciostatos, etc.

 

Por favor no dude en contactar con nosotros para más detalle

Thu

06

Dec

2018

ZP develops chloride sensor

At Zimmer we believe that ion sensors including sodium, potassium and pH are important sensors, that is why we are delighted to expand our range with a chloride sensor.


Wed

05

Dec

2018

Anatomy of a ZP Sensor

The adjacent picture is the front side and back side of a ZP sensor, when using these sensors it is important that the connector you use does not cause a short between the front side and backside. If you are planning to use these sensor in a potentiometric mode you of course need to make electrical connection with the working/sense electrode, you can then choose to use the reference or counter electrodes as your reference or short the counter and reference together and have them combined as the reference electrode.


Wed

05

Dec

2018

Questions about Zahner

At Zimmer and Peacock we are here to help our clients and customers. This week we had an enquiry about the EIS and potentiostats of Zahner that ZP distributes in the Nordics and UK.

 

In the short post below we have answered some of the recent questions we received. 

 

1. The Zahner system can be controlled by windows7/8/10-PC, though the Win10 machine is not supplied';this means that if you have a Win10 machine you can run the software.

 

2. Some of the Zahner potentiostats are advertised as having Controlled voltage: ±15 V / ±5 V, what this means is that you can choose to operate the instrument  at ±15 V or ±5 V; you will use the ±5 V voltage often in  applications like the Gratzel cell etc, whilst you will use the ±15 V setting in power applications like batteries and fuel cells. Switching between ±15 V or ±5 V is an option in the software.

 

3.What is the difference between the compliance voltage and the controlled voltage? Often in an electrochemical cell we will have the working electrode, the counter electrode and the reference electrode. The electrochemist is often interested in controlling the voltage at the working electrode (called controlled voltage), but what we as electrochemists sometimes over look is that the potentiostat then applies another voltage to the cell at the counter electrode called the compliance voltage. The reason that the potentiostat applies this compliance voltage at the counter electrode is because the rate of reaction at the counter electrode needs to be as fast as the rate of reaction/current at the working electrode. So in summary the controlled voltage is what we apply at working electrode, whilst the compliance voltage is what the potentiostat applies to the counter electrode to ensure the rate of reaction at the working electrode is as fast as it need to be.

 

4. Zahner instruments come with extra slots for additional hardware modules, these slots can be used for additonal cards like the TEMP/U and the PAD4. For example the TEMP/U allows for the measurement of parameters such as pH, temperature etc within the electrochemical cell, whilst teh PAD4 is often used to measure 4 electrochemical cells that are in a battery or fuel cell stack.

 

5.The PAD4 is useful in applications where you have for example a series of electrochemical cells stacked together to form a battery. The Zahner potentiostat would allow you to measure the impedance across the entire battery, but if you want to know how individual cells within the batter are performing you can use the PAD4 to measure up to 4 cells within the stack, of course the more PAD4 cards you use the more cells within a stack you can measure.

 

6 The PP211 is often supplied with Zahner CIMPS systems, this is because the Zahner CIMPS system has a light source and the P211 is the 'power supply  to that light source.


Sun

02

Dec

2018

ZP patrocina Congreso Colombiabo de Electroquimica

ZP se presenta como uno de los patrocinadores del Congreso Columbiano de Electroquímica.

 

 

ZP es uno de los líderes mundiales en tecnología para electroquímicos: electrodos impresos, potenciostatos, etc.

 

 

Por favor no dude en contactar con nosotros para más detalle

Por favor descargue nuestro catálogo.

Catalogue_ZP (3).pdf
Adobe Acrobat Document 15.4 MB

Fri

30

Nov

2018

Newsletter November 30

Welcome to this week's newsletter from Zimmer and Peacock. This newsletter is a mixture of news, stories and tech notes from Zimmer and Peacock. If you want to subscribe to our newsletter or have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock and our passion for biosensor technologies please don't hesitate to contact us.

Corrosion - Industry's Chronic Disease

 

At Zimmer and Peacock we believe in solving global problems and often this means working with our clients and collaborators on problems associated with human health using electrochemical biosensors, but this skill set also allows us to think about another global problem akin to chronic diseases which is corrosion.  

 

Corrosion is a trillion dollar global issue and at ZP we are very interested in bringing our medical technologies to monitoring and preventing the global problems of corrosion. This week we were invited to Southend Pier in the UK and were taken underneath the pier by the Pier Manager to see and discuss the areas of corrosion.

Zimmer and Peacock - New Team Members

 

Question - What do you get when you add one admin, one scientist and two engineers?

 

Answer - A much stronger team.

 

At Zimmer and Peacock we have been busy growing, welcome to our new team members.

ZP - pH of cheese

 

This week Zimmer and Peacock were asked to measure the pH of cheese and though it was a first for us we were able to do it using one of our disposable screen-printed pH sensors.

 

At Zimmer and Peacock we manufacture a number of sensors including: glucose, lactate, sodium, potassium, pH, oxygen, chilli hotness, garlic pungency etc. If you are looking for a sensor and it is not on our list please feel free to contact us or if you have any questions regarding our standard sensors don't hesitate to drop us a line.

ZP - A trillion dollar problem

 

At ZP we like to work on technologies that will change the world and that is why we put so much effort into health, well being, food and agriculture. This week we met with a number of stakeholders to brainstorm how to reduce a global epidemic, i.e. corrosion.

ZP - Cleanrooms

 

If you come to see Zimmer and Peacock in Horten we will probably take you to see our facility access at USN.

Fri

30

Nov

2018

Corrosion - Industry's Chronic Disease

At Zimmer and Peacock we believe in solving global problems and often this means working with our clients and collaborators on problems associated with human health using electrochemical biosensors, but this skill set also allows us to think about another global problem akin to chronic diseases which is corrosion.  Corrosion is a trillion dollar global issue and so at ZP we are very interested in bringing our medical technologies to monitoring and preventing the global problems of corrosion.  This week we were invited to Southend Pier in the UK and were taken underneath the pier by the Pier Manager to see and discuss the areas of corrosion.

Tue

27

Nov

2018

Zimmer and Peacock - New Team Members

Question - What do you get when you add one admin, one scientist and two engineers?

 

Answer - A much stronger team.

 

At Zimmer and Peacock we have been busy growing, welcome to our new team members.


Mon

26

Nov

2018

ZP - pH of cheese

This week Zimmer and Peacock were asked to measure the pH of cheese, and though a first for us we were able to do it using one of our disposable screen-printed pH sensors.

At Zimmer and Peacock we manufacture a number of sensors, including: glucose, lactate, sodium, potassium, pH, oxygen, chilli hotness, garlic pungency etc. If you are looking for a sensor and it is not on our list please feel free to contact us, of if you have any questions regarding our standard sensors don't hesitate to drop us a line.


Sun

25

Nov

2018

ZP - A trillion dollar problem

At ZP we like to work on technologies that will change the world, and that is why we put so much effort into health, well being, food and agriculture. This week we met with a number of stakeholders to brainstorm how to reduce a global epidemic, i.e. corrosion.

 

 


Sun

25

Nov

2018

ZP - Cleanrooms

If you come to see Zimmer and Peacock in Horten we will probably take you to see our facility access at USN.


Fri

23

Nov

2018

Newsletter November 23

Welcome to this week's newsletter from Zimmer and Peacock. This newsletter is a mixture of news, stories and tech notes from Zimmer and Peacock. If you want to subscribe to our newsletter or have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock and our passion for biosensor technologies please don't hesitate to contact us.

ZP - Corrosion conference

 

Zimmer and Peacock are delighted to be exhibiting at the Antwerp Maritime Academy on the 1st April as part of their Maritime Corrosion Workshop.

ZP - Adds liquids calibration and test solutions to product portfolio

 

At Zimmer and Peacock we believe in getting our customers and clients to market ASAP, so we are trying to remove every possible barrier.  This is why we have such a complete product and information offering around our sensors and products.

 

This week we have expanded our product portfolio to include calibration/test solutions for our sodium and potassium sensors.

 

ZP at Medica 2018

 

Zimmer and Peacock is a world leading contract developer and manufacturer of biosensors, sensors and medical diagnostics, so we visited Medica last week to talk to supplier and clients and understand the direction of the health markets.

Adhesives for wearable biosensors and sensors

 

At Zimmer and Peacock we know that wearables are the future of biosensors, health and fitness monitoring. We specialise in the contract design and contract manufacture of biosensors and medical diagnostics including wearable sensors and biosensors. Our wearable biosensor capabilities include: glucose, lactate, sodium, potassium, pH, oxygen, etc. Alongside our understanding of the sensor we also have the electronics for both the sensor and the bluetooth communication. 

 

At ZP we appreciate that the choice of adhesive materials to attach the sensors to the skin is important, and the choice of materials depends on the: application, the skin type, the demographics of the target market, the expected duration of wear. Find out more on our website here

Wed

21

Nov

2018

ZP - Corrosion conference

Zimmer and Peacock are delighted to be exhibiting at the Antwerp Maritime Academy on the 1st April as part of their Maritime Corrosion Workshop.


Mon

19

Nov

2018

ZP - Adds liquids calibration and test solutions to product portfolio

At Zimmer and Peacock we believe in getting our customers and clients to market ASAP, so we are trying to remove every possible barrier; hence why we have such a complete product and information offering around our sensors and products.

 

This week we have expanded our product portfolio to include calibration/test solutions for our sodium and potassium sensors.

 

 


Sun

18

Nov

2018

ZP at Medica 2018

Zimmer and Peacock is a world leading contract developer and manufacturer of biosensors, sensors and medical diagnostics, and so we visited Medica last week to talk to supplier and clients, and understand the direction of the health markets.


Sun

18

Nov

2018

Adhesives for wearable biosensors and sensors

At Zimmer and Peacock we know that wearables are the future of biosensors, health and fitness monitoring. We specialise in the contract design and contract manufacture of biosensors and medical diagnostics including wearable sensors and biosensors. Our wearable biosensor capabilities include: glucose, lactate, sodium, potassium, pH, oxygen, etc. Alongside our understanding of the sensor we also have the electronics for both the sensor and the bluetooth communication. 

 

At ZP we appreciate that the choice of adhesive materials to attach the sensors to the skin is important, and the choice of materials depends on the: application, the skin type, the demographics of the target market, the expected duration of wear.

 

Clearly an adhesive material has a degree of adhesion, which is not static  with time. The adhesivity can increase with time reaching a maximum before the adhesion begins to decrease; at the same time the skin is also replenishing and so skin cells that we initially in place start to shed, and the adhesive can start to peel away.

 

The material scientists have a number of levers to pull when selecting or designing an adhesive material for a wearable biosensor/sensor application this included : class of compound, specific compound, thickness of adhesive etc.

 

In the adjacent video we show four adhesive attached to the same subject, left for 2 hours and then an attempt is made to remove each adhesive, and it is clear that each material has a different degree of tackiness to the skin.


Sun

18

Nov

2018

Long term monitoring of potassium ions

At ZP we are in a continuous mode of improving our sensors. In this recent effort we have studied our potassium sensors for longer period to see the drift as  a function of time.

In the adjacent experiment a ZP potassium sensors were tested at three concentrations of 0.1 mM, 1 mM and 10 mM potassium ion concentration. The sensor was tested this way in three consecutive experiments, within a 45 minute period - see adjacent image.


The sensor was taken out of solution between each experiment (trial) and in this study the sensors showed a change between each trial -  see adjacent image.


We zoomed in on the data at 1 mM potassium to understand the drift on the sensors - see adjacent image.

 

We were able to determine that the potassium sensor showed a change in sensitivity of approximately 6 % per hour when in a constant concentration solution of potassium ions of 1 mM .


The importance of sensor drift on a potassium ion sensor (ISE) depends on the application, if you have any commercial or technical questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock's potassium ISE then please don't hesitate to contact us.

Fri

16

Nov

2018

Newsletter November 16

Welcome to this week's newsletter from Zimmer and Peacock. This newsletter is a mixture of news, stories and tech notes from Zimmer and Peacock. If you want to subscribe to our newsletter or have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock and our passion for biosensor technologies please don't hesitate to contact us.

Continuous Glucose Monitoring is in a Renaissance

 

We were recently at the Diabetes Technology Conference in Bethesda Maryland and it was clear that there was a new wave of interest in continuous glucose sensors and monitoring. So to celebrate ZP has launched our increased capabilities in the CGM space.

ZP at TekMar - Trondheim

 

Zimmer and Peacock are a world leader in biosensor development and contract manufacturing. We are delighted to be attending TekMar 2018 on 4-5 December in Trondheim, where we will be discussing biosensors for Salmon Farming and other Aquaculture applications.

ZP at Diabetes Technology Meeting 2018

 

Zimmer and Peacock were delighted to present our poster and perform hardware demos at the Diabetes Technology Meeting 2018 in Bethesda.

 

Please feel free to download our poster from our website and click the links to see the range of biosensors and our wearable biosensor platform for continuous glucose monitoring and other wearable biosensor applications.

Tue

13

Nov

2018

Continuous Glucose Monitoring is in a Renaissance

We were recently at the Diabetes Technology Conference in Bethesda Maryland, and it was clear that there was a new wave of interest in continuous glucose sensors and monitoring, and so to celebrate ZP has launched our increased capabilities in the CGM space.


Sun

11

Nov

2018

ZP at TekMar - Trondheim

Zimmer and Peacock are a world leader in biosensor development and contract manufacturing. We are delighted to be attending TekMar 2018 on the 4 and 5 December in Trondheim, where we will be discussing biosensor for Salmon Farming and other Aquaculture applications.


Sat

10

Nov

2018

ZP at Diabetes Technology Meeting 2018

Zimmer and Peacock were delighted to present our poster and perform hardware demos at the Diabetes Technology Meeting 2018 in Bethesda.

 

Please feel free to download our poster from this page and click the links to see the range of biosensors and our wearable biosensor platform for continuous glucose monitoring and other wearable biosensor applications.


Please download our DTM poster here.

ZP- DTM Posterver1.0.0.pdf
Adobe Acrobat Document 1.2 MB

Fri

09

Nov

2018

Newsletter November 9

Welcome to this week's newsletter from Zimmer and Peacock. This newsletter is a mixture of news, stories and tech notes from Zimmer and Peacock. If you want to subscribe to our newsletter or have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock and our passion for biosensor technologies please don't hesitate to contact us.

ZP launches Garlic Pungency Sensor

 

Zimmer and Peacock launches a new sensor for the rapid and easy determination of garlic and garlic products. Find out more on our website here

ZP appear in Oxford University Periodic Magazine

 

Zimmer and Peacock are delighted to be highlighted in the University of Oxford Periodic Magazine. The article deals with the Chilli Sensing Technology developed at the Compton Group and how ZP has rapidly taken it to market.

ZP - Biosensors in Surgery

 

Zimmer and Peacock were recently invited to speak on a panel for Talent Bank in Swansea.

 

As part of the day ZP got to see the future generation of surgeons practicing their skills.

Fri

09

Nov

2018

ZP launches Garlic Pungency Sensor

Zimmer and Peacock launches a new sensor for the rapid and easy determination of garlic and garlic products.

To find out more about ZP click the buttons below.


Thu

08

Nov

2018

ZP appear in Oxford University Periodic Magazine

Zimmer and Peacock are delighted to be highlighted in the University of Oxford Periodic Magazine. The article deals with the Chilli Sensing Technology developed at the Compton Group and how ZP has rapidly taken it to market.


Wed

07

Nov

2018

ZP - Biosensors in Surgery

Zimmer and Peacock were recently invited to speak on a  panel for Talent Bank in  Swansea.

 

As part of the day ZP got to see the future generation of surgeons practicing their skills.


Fri

02

Nov

2018

Newsletter November 2

Welcome to this week's newsletter from Zimmer and Peacock. This newsletter is a mixture of news, stories and tech notes from Zimmer and Peacock. If you want to subscribe to our newsletter or have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock and our passion for biosensor technologies please don't hesitate to contact us.

Smart Sensors for Drug Testing (Cannabidiol detection)

 

Zimmer and Peacock is sponsoring a research Masters project to develop a novel, smart electrochemical sensor technology for the detection of Cannabidiol (or CBD), a prescription drug. Using the state of the art facilities at Swansea’s Centre for Nanohealth, the MSc scholar will work with top research scientists and academics to develop sensors for testing and purity quality control.

Joining PalmSens to Micrux

 

At Zimmer and Peacock we distribute both Micrux and PalmSens as we believe in the best technology for the problem that is being investigated or solved, sometimes this is a combination of parts from both companies.

 

In this image we have shown all the parts necessary to go from a MUX8 to a Multi8x-AIO.

See our labs and rapid prototyping

 

Please watch this video to have a peek behind the scenes at Zimmer and Peacock.

 

Zimmer and Peacock is a world leading contract biosensor and medical diagnostics company for wearable biosensor, sensors and medical diagnostics, the video shows some of our rapid prototyping services.

Signal as a function of SPE

 

In the experiments on our website here, Zimmer and Peacock shows the data recorded on a number of our screen printed electrodes - SPEs. Zimmer and Peacock are experts on screen printed electrodes (SPEs), electrochemistry and electrochemical sensors so if you have any questions please don't hesitate to contact us.

Choosing an SPE

 

 

Zimmer and Peacock is focused on helping our clients and partners get to marker ASAP with electrochemical sensors suitable for field applications.

 

For a screen printed electrode to be commercially successful in the field the following FEATURES are important.

 

1. FEATURE ONE - The sensor must have the potential to be low cost, so to ensure the highest margins.

2. FEATURE TWO - The sensors have to function correctly.

3. FEATURE THREE -The sensors should operate at a low power, with simpler electronics.

 

It is with these FEATURES in mind that ZP has started to promote the ‘value range’ over our first generation of sensors and electrodes. Find out more on our website here.

 

ZP Team at Made in Horten

 

Zimmer and Peacock AS is Norway's leading contract biosensor, wearable biosensor and medical diagnostics company providing contract development and manufacturing services, alongside our standard products.

 

This week we were showing our technologies and capabilities ranging from exhaled breath collection to the hotness of chilli sensing at the Made in Horten show.

Thu

01

Nov

2018

Smart Sensors for Drug Testing (Cannabidiol detection)

Zimmer and Peacock is sponsoring a research Masters project to develop a novel, smart electrochemical sensor technology for the detection of Cannabidiol (or CBD), a prescription drug. Using the state of the art facilities at Swansea’s Centre for Nanohealth, the MSc scholar will work with top research scientists and academics to develop sensors for testing and purity quality control.


Wed

31

Oct

2018

Joining PalmSens to Micrux

At Zimmer and Peacock we distribute both Micrux and PalmSens as we believe in the best technology for the problem that is being investigated or solved, sometimes this is a combination of parts from both companies.

 

In the adjacent image we have shown all the parts necessary to go from a MUX8 to a Multi8x-AIO.


Mon

29

Oct

2018

See our labs and rapid prototyping

Please watch the adjacent video to have a peek behind the scenes at Zimmer and Peacock.

 

 

Zimmer and Peacock is a world leading contract biosensor and medical diagnostics company for wearable biosensor, sensors and medical diagnostics, the video shows some of our rapid prototyping services.

 

 


Sun

28

Oct

2018

Signal as a function of SPE

In the experiments below Zimmer and Peacock shows the data recorded on a number of our screen printed electrodes - SPEs. Zimmer and Peacock are experts on screen printed electrodes (SPEs), electrochemistry and electrochemical sensors so if you have any questions please don't hesitate to contact us.

In the adjacent image the cyclic voltammogram was recorded on our our gold screen printed electrodes.

In the adjacent image the cyclic voltammogram was recorded on a carbon screen printed electrodes.


In the adjacent image the cyclic voltammogram was recorded on a platinum screen printed electrodes, note the presence of the oxygen reduction peak not present when the same solution was tested with carbon or gold electrodes.

n the adjacent image the cyclic voltammogram was recorded on an organic solvent resistant screen printed electrodes, note how the cyclic voltammogram is distorted due to the electrodes material, which is highly stable but also has a higher resistance.


Fri

26

Oct

2018

Choosing an SPE

Zimmer and Peacock is focused on helping our clients and partners get to marker ASAP with electrochemical sensors suitable for field applications.

 

For a screen printed electrode to be commercially successful in the field the following FEATURES are important.

 

1. FEATURE ONE - The sensor must have the potential to be low cost, so to ensure the highest margins.

2. FEATURE TWO - The sensors have to function correctly.

3. FEATURE THREE -The sensors should operate at a low power, with simpler electronics.

 

It is with these FEATURES in mind that ZP has started to promote the ‘value range’ over our first generation of sensors and electrodes.

 

 

In the following sections we discuss why the ZP ‘value’ sensors are superior over the ZP first generation of electrodes.

FEATURE ONE - COST

The ‘value’ sensors are 44 % smaller than the generation one sensors. This means that when manufacturing sensors in processes such as sputtering, flat-bed screen printing, roll-to-roll printing etc one will produce 1.8 times more value sensors for every one ZP sensors.  Clearly the production capacity can be approximately doubled by this simple change with little or no CAPEX expenditure.

ZP also sees the ZP value sensor’s benefits translating into other downfield processes, for example if sensors are functionalized by a digital printing process it is possible to functionalize a sheet of value electrodes and produce  1.8 more sensors before having to do a card/sheet change.

The smaller form factor adds benefits further downstream when it comes to packing, storing and shipping.

ZP does understand that you cannot make a sensor so small that the user can no longer handle the sensors, and so we have surveyed the glucose strip market before coming to the final decision on the value sensor size; we also now have practical experience from our ChilliPot product which is on the market and uses the value sensor form factor. 


FEATURE TWO – CORRECT FUNCTION

ZP employs a number of principles from the glucose strip market and so it is fairly achievable to make microfluidic/capillary fill sensors with electrodes in close proximity to one another and where the sample volumes can be below 1 microliter. 

 

Whilst it is both a nice feature for the clients to have the ability to use sample volumes as small as 300 nL it does introduce an issue not commonly considered by electrochemists, which is ‘what is happening at the counter electrode?’

 

In traditional electrochemical thinking what happens at the counter electrode has been mostly ignored based on the following assumptions:

 

1) ASSUMPTION ONE - The counter electrode has been traditionally large relative to the working electrode.

2) ASSUMPTION TWO - The counter electrode has traditionally been at some distance from the working electrode.

3) ASSUMPTION THREE – Traditionally the solution within the electrochemical cell has been large relative to the electrodes.

 

The three assumption above are used by electrochemists to say that the counter electrode is not so important when understanding the signals within an electrochemical sensor, but these assumptions are not necessarily valid in very small volumes associated with electrochemical sensors and biosensors which have capillary/microfluidic chambers upon them.

 

Let’s consider a thought experiment containing an electrochemical assay which operates by applying 650 mV to the working electrode; in this assay the analyte is oxidized at the working electrode, at the counter electrode an equimolar reduction reaction is occurring in parallel with the working electrode reaction.  The reaction at the counter electrode is often not known or fully characterized and can be influenced by a number of parameters including: the concentration of oxygen, the pH, the current driven at the working electrode. 

Therefore, there are at least three variables that govern what maybe happening at the counter electrode, one thing one can often be certain of when using a traditional carbon platinum or gold electrode which is that the counter electrode electrochemical reaction is at best unclear and often unknown.   

The issue is that the unknown products at the counter electrode may diffuse across to the working electrode and so after some seconds the products of reaction at the counter electrode may start to influence the reactions at the working electrode and therefore introduce an otherwise over-looked and uncontrolled contribution to the signal effect, this is schematically.

 

The diffusion of material from the counter electrode to the working electrode in systems where the electrode spacing is millimeters can happen on the seconds to 10s of seconds time range, and so this event can influence the signal. The observable effects of this diffusion can be numerous, but one possible outcome is an electrochemical feedback loop where the reduction product at the counter electrode diffuses to the working electrode and is subsequently re-oxidized. This re-oxidation in turn causes a further increase in current at the counter electrode which in turn drives further diffusion of reduced material from the counter electrode to the working electrode hence further driving up the current, this is in effect a closed loop electrochemical  feedback system , we illustrate such a scenario in the adjacent figure.


At Zimmer and Peacock we have observed the phenomena described in the figure, and have had it reported to us by others in the glucose strip market. 

With the ZP value sensors we have eliminated this effect by instead of having just a bare carbon, platinum or gold counter electrode we instead have a silver/silver chloride counter electrode. What this means is that if the counter electrode is at a negative voltage then the  silver chloride is reduced to silver which is an insoluble product and therefore will not diffuse to the working electrode; of course the counter to this is if the counter electrode is a positive voltage then the silver is converted to the insoluble silver chloride which again does not diffuse to the working electrode. 

The use of silver/silver chloride on the counter electrode of the ZP value sensor at the very least produces a defined reaction on the counter electrode which would otherwise be an unknown reaction which can have unexpected outcomes.

 

 

Feature 3 – Power

 

Though not a topic often discussed the power it takes to drive an electrochemical sensors and biosensors can be linked to two parameters:

 

1) The working voltage – the voltage applied to the working electrode relative the reference electrode.

2) The compliance voltage – the voltage applied to the counter electrode to ensure that the reaction at the counter electrode is not the rate limiting step to the reaction at the working electrode.

It is often overlooked by sensors designers that the chemistry at the counter electrode can influence the power consumption of the analog electronics; for example, if no particular care is taken on the counter electrode material then the compliance voltage maybe - 0.9 V due to the reduction of water. Therefore if the voltage on the working electrode is  0.25 V, the entire cell potential is 1.15 V. A simple change of material on the counter  electrode to silver/silver chloride means that there is now the potential for a very facile reaction on the counter electrode as silver chloride can be converted into silver, and similarly silver into silver chloride in the case of a positive voltage at the counter electrode. The conversion of silver and silver chloride occurs at a compliance potential close to 0 V and so the cell potential for a sensor where 0.25 V is applied the working electrode will now be approximately 0.25 V, as opposed to the previous 1.15 V. This can result in both simpler electronics running at a lower power duty.

 

SUMMARY

Zimmer and Peacock is promoting it’s value sensors over the more traditional sensors because we see that it offers several commercial and technical advantages over the more traditional sensor form factor.


Fri

26

Oct

2018

ZP Team at Made in Horten

Zimmer and Peacock AS is Norway's leading contract biosensor, wearable biosensor and medical diagnostics company providing contract development and manufacturing services, alongside our standard products.

 

This week we were showing our technologies and capabilities ranging from exhaled breath collection to the hotness of chilli sensing at the Made in Horten show.


Fri

26

Oct

2018

Newsletter October 26

Welcome to this week's newsletter from Zimmer and Peacock. This newsletter is a mixture of news, stories and tech notes from Zimmer and Peacock. If you want to subscribe to our newsletter or have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock and our passion for biosensor technologies please don't hesitate to contact us.

Measuring the hotness of curry

 

The owners of Horten's leading curry house receive a live demo of the ChilliPot - Scoville Meter.

 

The ChilliPot manufactured by ZP's Chilli Technology Group is the world's only objective measurement of the hotness of foods and products containing chillies.

ZP - Brainstorming and Team Building

 

A couple of weeks ago ZP had its company meeting, where we focused on brainstorming and team building.

 

Zimmer and Peacock is a world leader in contract development and manufacturing of wearable biosensors and medical diagnostics. Click the videos below for an insight into our corporate culture.

Thu

25

Oct

2018

Measuring the hotness of curry

The owners of Horten's leading Indian restaurant receive a live demo of the ChilliPot - Scoville  Meter.

 

The ChilliPot manufactured by ZP's Chilli Technology Group is the world's only objective measurement of the hotness of foods and products containing chillies.


Tue

23

Oct

2018

ZP - Brainstorming and Team Building

A couple of weeks ago ZP had it's company meeting, where we focused on brainstorming and team building.

 

Zimmer and Peacock is a world leader in contract development and manufacturing of wearable biosensors and medical diagnostics. Click the videos below for an insight into our corporate culture.


Fri

19

Oct

2018

Newsletter October 19

Welcome to this week's newsletter from Zimmer and Peacock. This newsletter is a mixture of news, stories and tech notes from Zimmer and Peacock. If you want to subscribe to our newsletter or have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock and our passion for biosensor technologies please don't hesitate to contact us.

ZP - Indonesia

 

ZP has global written throughout our DNA and so we are delighted to have happy friends and colleagues in Indonesia.

 

At ZP we don't think it's enough to provide technology, you also have to provide the training and service.

Wetting time in CGM sensors

 

If you are wondering how long a CGM takes to break in or stabilise the answer is it depends on the materials of construction, in this figure the thickness of the polymers layers means it takes about 2 hours.

Meet us in San Jose in December

 

Zimmer and Peacock will be at BioMed Devices in San Jose on 5-6 December 2018.

 

ZP is a leading contract developer and manufacturer of biosensors and medical diagnostics and so we are delighted to be exhibiting in San Jose for a second year running.

Thu

18

Oct

2018

ZP - Indonesia

ZP has global written throughout our DNA and so we are delighted to have happy friends and colleagues in Indonesia.

 

At ZP we don't think it's enough to provide technology, you also have to provide the training and service.


Thu

18

Oct

2018

Wetting time in CGM sensors

If you are wondering how long a CGM takes to break in or stabilise the answer is it depends on the materials of construction, in this figure the thickness of the polymers layers means it takes about 2 hours.


Tue

16

Oct

2018

Meet us in San Jose in December

Zimmer and Peacock will be at BioMed Devices in San Jose on the 5 and 6 December 2018.

 

ZP is a leading contract developer and manufacturer of biosensors and medical diagnostics and so we are delighted to be exhibiting in San Jose for a second year running.


Fri

12

Oct

2018

Newsletter October 12

Welcome to this week's newsletter from Zimmer and Peacock. This newsletter is a mixture of news, stories and tech notes from Zimmer and Peacock. If you want to subscribe to our newsletter or have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock and our passion for biosensor technologies please don't hesitate to contact us.

ZP - integrates flex and biosensors

 

At ZP we are all about innovating and this photo is an example.

 

Here we have taken our flex circuit and made it work with our standard sensors.

ZP featured in AZO Sensors

 

ZP is one of the leading companies for performing tech transfer from Universities to the Market, so we were delighted to be featured on the AZO website.

Thu

11

Oct

2018

ZP - integrates flex and biosensors

At ZP we are all about innovating, and this photo is an example.

 

Here we have taken our flex circuit and made it work with our standard sensors.


Mon

08

Oct

2018

ZP featured in AZO Sensors

ZP is one of the leading companies for performing tech transfer from Universities to the Market, hence we were delighted to be featured on the AZO website.


Fri

05

Oct

2018

Newsletter October 5

Welcome to this week's newsletter from Zimmer and Peacock. This newsletter is a mixture of news, stories and tech notes from Zimmer and Peacock. If you want to subscribe to our newsletter or have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock and our passion for biosensor technologies please don't hesitate to contact us.

ZP - UV exclusion

 

At ZP we know that the more environmental parameters we control the more controlled the sensors and biosensors, that is why we are excluding UV light from critical parts of the sensor and biosensor fabrication process.

ZP looking for partners - pH microwell system

 

Zimmer and Peacock is a global leader in contract electrochemical sensor and biosensor development and manufacturing, and this has  generated an interest from our clients for ZP taking our capabilities in sensor manufacturing, hardware manufacturing and software design through to a system for measuring pH in  a microwell format.

 

In this note we describe the system we have been asked to develop and ask anyone interested in collaborating with us on this to contact us, we are specifically interested in scientists, engineers, etc who are interested in using such a system in their work and research.

Zimmer and Peacock at Sensors and Instrumentation Birmingham

 

Zimmer and Peacock were delighted to speak with everyone at Sensors and Instrumentation in Birmingham.

 

On our website we have put some quick links to who we are and some of the technologies we discussed.

Collecting the Exhaled Breath Condensate

 

Zimmer and Peacock have launched their G1 Exhaled Breath Collection Device for collecting exhaled breath condensate.

 

This is functionalized to only collect the exhaled breath condensate and is the fastest most efficient collector of breath condensate, with the user only having to perform normal tidal breathing.

 

Please don't hesitate to contact us to find out more.

Measuring sauces at the restaurant

 

Visit our website to see the latest demo of the ChillIpot - Scoville Meter from the ZP Chilli Group.

Thu

04

Oct

2018

ZP - UV exclusion

At ZP we know that the more environmental parameters we control the more controlled the sensors and biosensors, that is why we are excluding UV light from critical parts of the sensor and biosensor fabrication process.


Thu

04

Oct

2018

ZP looking for partners - pH microwell system

Zimmer and Peacock is a global leader in contract electrochemical sensor and biosensor development and manufacturing, and this has  generated an interest from our clients for ZP taking our capabilities in sensor manufacturing, hardware manufacturing and software design through to a system for measuring pH in  a microwell format.

 

In this note we describe the system we have been asked to develop and ask anyone interested in collaborating with us on this to contact us, we are specifically interested in scientists, engineers, etc who are interested in using such a system in their work and research.


What are we proposing to do?

At ZP we are proposing to take our electrochemical pH measuring capabilities and apply it to a microplate format.

What we are proposing to do is manufacture a 96 well plate with  a pH sensor in each well, in addition we will take our existing hardware for measuring pH and scale it so that rather than measuring one pH sensor we will  measure 96 pH sensors in parallel.


Software and the user experience.

At ZP we fully understand that the ease of use comes in part from the software so we want a user interface that is easy and intuitive. We will develop two screens:

  • Screen One - a first screen where the current pH in a well is shown and is colour coded to show whether the conditions are acidic, basic or alkali.
  • Screen Two - a second screen is accessed from Screen One and shows how the pH has changed as a function of time.

We understand that some clients will want ot have temperature control and temperature monitoring, we intend to have temperature monitoring built into the plate. The temperature control will be achieved by ZP designing  plate so that it can still be used within existing microplate temperature chambers.


ZP Partners

Zimmer and Peacock is looking for partners who are interested in being the first beta users, and getting early access to the technology. Please don't hesite to contact us if you have any questions regarding this programme.


Mon

01

Oct

2018

Zimmer and Peacock at Sensors and Instrumentation Birmingham

Zimmer and Peacock were delighted to speak with everyone at Sensors and Instrumentation in Birmingham.

 

Below we have put some quick links to who we are and some of the technologies we discussed.


Fri

28

Sep

2018

Collecting the Exhaled Breath Condensate

Zimmer and Peacock have launched their G1 Exhaled Breath Collection Device for collecting exhaled breath condensate.

 

The is functionalized to only collect the exhaled breath condensate, and is the fastest most efficient collector of breath condensate, with the user only having to perform normal tidal breathing.

 

Please don't hesitate to contact us to find out more.

Spec:

- Collection time : 60 sec

- Collection sample volume: > 4uL for 60sec

- Operating temperature : 

- Option to also get the AnaPot plus sensors for rapid testing of the collected sample.


Fri

28

Sep

2018

Measuring sauces at the restaurant

Click the button below to see the latest demo of the ChillIpot - Scoville Meter from the ZP Chilli Group.


Fri

28

Sep

2018

Newsletter September 28

Welcome to this week's newsletter from Zimmer and Peacock. This newsletter is a mixture of news, stories and tech notes from Zimmer and Peacock. If you want to subscribe to our newsletter or have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock and our passion for biosensor technologies please don't hesitate to contact us.

ZP Speaks at MEMS and Sensors Conference

 

This week Zimmer and Peacock were delighted to speak at the MEMS and Sensors Conference in Grenoble France.

 

We covered everything from oxygen sensors, to potassium sensors, to lactate sensors, to hydrogen peroxide sensors, to glucose sensors, to chilli sensors, to pH sensors, to sodium sensors, to garlic sensors.

ZP in Brazil

 

ZP were delighted to be Sao Paulo recently, talking to the research teams and forming strong commercial bonds.

ZP - Unversidade de Sao Paulo

 

Zimmer and Peacock were delighted to meet new friends at the University of Sao Paulo this week.

 

ZP - The University of Bath

 

Zimmer and Peacock were delighted to speak recently as the University of Bath on how to commercialise biosensors and medical diagnostics.

ZP - Sensors and Biosensors in Indonesia

 

ZP was delighted to cement stronger relationships with the Indonesian sensor and biosensor community on a recent trip.

ZP and Zahner at ISE Bolognia

 

Thank you for speaking with Pavel and Jann at ISE Bolognia.

 

On our website we have put a link to Zahner's Potentiostat Technology and an introduction to Zimmer and Peacock

ZP and PalmSens - Antwerp

 

Zimmer and Peacock recently exhibited at SMOBE2018, alongside PalmSens.

ZP at USN Norway

 

Zimmer and Peacock has hired nine scientists and engineers so far from US, so this week we were delighted to go back and start the recruitment of the next generation of biosensors and medical diagnostic developers and manufacturers.

Wed

26

Sep

2018

ZP at USN Norway

Zimmer and Peacock has hired nine scientists and engineers so far from US, and so this week we were delighted to go back and start the recruitment of the next generation of biosensors and medical diagnostic developers and manufacturers.


Sat

22

Sep

2018

ZP and PalmSens - Antwerp

Zimmer and Peacock recently exhibited at SMOBE2018, alongside PalmSens.


Sat

22

Sep

2018

ZP and Zahner at ISE Bolognia

Thank you for speaking with Pavel and Jann at ISE Bolognia.

 

On this page we have put a link to Zahner's Potentiostat Technology and an introduction to Zimmer and Peacock


Sat

22

Sep

2018

ZP - Sensors and Biosensors in Indonesia

ZP was delighted to cement stronger relationships with the Indonesian sensor and biosensor community on a recent trip.


Sat

22

Sep

2018

ZP - The University of Bath

Zimmer and Peacock were delighted to speak recently as the University of Bath on how to commercialise biosensors and medical diagnostics.


Sat

22

Sep

2018

ZP - Unversidade de Sao Paulo

Zimmer and Peacock were delighted to meet new friends at the University of Sao Paulo this week.


Sat

22

Sep

2018

ZP in Brazil

ZP were delighted to be Sao Paulo recently, talking to the research teams and forming strong commercial bonds.


Sat

22

Sep

2018

ZP Speaks at MEMS and Sensors Conference

This week Zimmer and Peacock were delighted to speak at the MEMS and Sensors Conference in Grenoble France.

 

We covered everything from oxygen sensors, to potassium sensors, to lactate sensors, to hydrogen peroxide sensors, to glucose sensors, to chilli sensors, to pH sensors, to sodium sensors, to garlic sensors.


Fri

21

Sep

2018

Newsletter September 21

Welcome to this week's newsletter from Zimmer and Peacock. This newsletter is a mixture of news, stories and tech notes from Zimmer and Peacock. If you want to subscribe to our newsletter or have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock and our passion for biosensor technologies please don't hesitate to contact us.

Chilli Sensor honoured by customer

 

The ZP Chilli Technology Group has been honoured by one of our customers who has put our logo next to the Scoville Heat Unit.

University of Leicester - Zimmer and Peacock

 

Zimmer and Peacock have been invited to the University of Leicester to give a talk to the chemistry group.

 

Description: Dr. Martin Peacock will discuss his career and what it takes to bring a scientific idea to the market.

 

Speaker: Martin Peacock, Director, Zimmer and Peacock

 

Martin Peacock is an industrial bioelectrochemist, having worked at GSK and Abbott Diabetes, before catching the entrepreneurial bug and founding a number of companies. Martin has now set up companies in California, the UK and Norway and so has both a strong technical understanding coupled with the realities of manufacturing and commercializing biosensor technologies. Martin still authors academic papers, alongside writing business plans and developing business strategies.

 

Thu

20

Sep

2018

University of Leicester - Zimmer and Peacock

Zimmer and Peacock have been invited to the University of Leicester to give a talk to the chemistry group.

 

Description: Dr. Martin Peacock will discuss his career and what it takes to bring a scientific idea to the market.

 

Speaker: Martin Peacock, Director, Zimmer and Peacock

 

Martin Peacock is an industrial bioelectrochemist, having worked at GSK and Abbott Diabetes, before catching the entrepreneurial bug and founding a number of companies. Martin has now set up companies in California, the UK and Norway and so has both a strong technical understanding coupled with the realities of manufacturing and commercializing biosensor technologies. Martin still authors academic papers, alongside writing business plans and developing business strategies.

 


Sat

15

Sep

2018

Chilli Sensor honoured by customer

The ZP Chilli Technology Group has been honoured by one of our customers who has put our logo next to the Scoville Heat Unit.


Fri

14

Sep

2018

Newsletter September 14

Welcome to this week's newsletter from Zimmer and Peacock. This newsletter is a mixture of news, stories and tech notes from Zimmer and Peacock. If you want to subscribe to our newsletter or have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock and our passion for biosensor technologies please don't hesitate to contact us.

Made in Horten

 

Zimmer and Peacock are exhibiting at Made in Horten on the 12 October 2018.

 

Please come and meet the team there.

Measuring pH with Arduino

 

At Zimmer and Peacock we believe in helping our customers and collaborators get to market.

 

In this video we show a low cost set of electronics that can be used to get a signal from our pH electrode

 

We used the board in conjunction with Gravity: Analog pH Sensor / Meter Kit For Arduino.

Fri

14

Sep

2018

Made in Horten

Zimmer and Peacock are exhibiting at Made in Horten on the 12 October 2018.

 

 

Please come and meet the team there.


Fri

14

Sep

2018

Measuring pH with Arduino

At Zimmer and Peacock we believe in helping our customers and collaborators get to market.

 

In this video we show a low cost set of electronics that can be used to get a signal from our pH electrode


The board seen in the video was build in accordance with this schematic.

 

We used the board in conjunction with Gravity: Analog pH Sensor / Meter Kit For Arduino.


Fri

07

Sep

2018

Newsletter September 7

Welcome to this week's newsletter from Zimmer and Peacock. This newsletter is a mixture of news, stories and tech notes from Zimmer and Peacock. If you want to subscribe to our newsletter or have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock and our passion for biosensor technologies please don't hesitate to contact us.

100 micrometer electrodes

 

At Zimmer and Peacock we love electrochemistry as it offers a low cost sensor, biosensor and medical diagnostic.

 

In the adjacent image we show an electrochemical based sensor under a microscope, where it can be seen that the features of the electrode are on the order of 100 micrometers, which is the width of a human hair.

ZP expands labs

 

We are focused on productising and commercialising our collaborators projects and products in sensors, biosensors and medical diagnostics. As part of the effort we are often called upon to do lab work, so we have had to expand our labs to cope with the increase in business.

ZP expands into Indonesia

 

A central tenant at Zimmer and Peacock is to be an internal company and so were delighted to make new friends and contacts in Indonesia.

ZP Speak at International Conference on Agricultural Post Harvest

 

Zimmer and Peacock were delighted to attend and speak at the International conference on Agricultural and Postharvest Handling and Processing.

 

We talked about our willingness to partner on product development and manufacturing, and used our Chilli Sensor as the perfect case study.

The future is already wearables

 

At Zimmer and Peacock we are actively supporting wearable biosensor technologies through our contract development and manufacturing services; so that designers, engineers, scientists and entrepreneurs can incorporate biochemical assays into their smart devices, garments and health trackers.  

 

Find out more about our standard biosensors on our website, these formulations can be moved onto our wearable platform.

Making electrical connection with our/your CGM sensor

 

Zimmer and Peacock are a world leading contract sensor, biosensor and medical diagnostics development and manufacturing company, including continuous glucose monitoring (CGM).

 

At Zimmer and Peacock we understand the importance of making a great electrical  connection to a CGM sensor and so alongside our CGM sensors we ship connectors so people can start their in-vitro studies more successfully.

 

ZP - All carbon pH electrode

 

Zimmer and Peacock manufactures disposable pH sensors for single and continuous use. We have just expanded the range by manufacturing an all carbon version.

ZP Sponsoring BioEl2019 International Winterschool on Bioelectronics

 

Zimmer and Peacock are the world leader contract developer and manufacturer of sensors and biosensors, so we are product to be sponsoring the BIOEI 2019 conference.

Wed

05

Sep

2018

100 micrometer electrodes

At Zimmer and Peacock we love electrochemistry as it offers a low cost sensor, biosensor and medical diagnostic.

 

In the adjacent image we show an electrochemical based sensor under a microscope, where it can be seen that the features of the electrode are on the order of 100 micrometers, which is the width of a human hair.


Tue

04

Sep

2018

ZP expands labs

At ZP we are focused on productising and commercialising our collaborators projects and products in sensors, biosensors and medical diagnostics .

 

As part of the effort we are often called upon to do lab work, and so we have had to expand our labs to cope with the increase in buisness.


www.zimmerpeacock.com 2019