Below is the rolling news feed from Zimmer and Peacock. Our news feed represents that Zimmer and Peacock is a fast moving active company with lots of well-directed activity.

Tue

19

Jan

2021

USN Industrial Masters @ZP

 Zimmer and Peacock AS (ZP AS) are sponsors of the Industrial Master of Science Programme at USN - Micro and Nano System Technology, and is Norway's fastest growing biosensor and in-vitro diagnostic company. Head-quartered in Horten Norway, our team engages with clients and collaborators from Australia to California.

 

 

 

USN Industrial Masters @ZP

The USN Industrial Masters at ZP AS means you will work between USN and ZP AS. When at ZP AS you will be embedded within an international  team helping us to fulfill our mission to develop electrochemical biosensing systems that can positively impact society, our applications include: health, wellness, food and beverage, agriculture, aquaculture, environmental and process control.

The mission at ZP is to focus on the biosensors required for the internet of things (IoT) revolution, but to tackle the hard to develop sensors for molecules, bacteria and viruses. As part of our team engineers and scientist work across disciplines including: electronics engineering, mechanical engineering, biosensing engineering, chemistry,  microbiology, molecular biology, firmware coding, data-sciences and Cloud solution development.

Though our scientists and engineers have specific subject matter expertise, they  apply their skills within a multi-disciplinary team and have the satisfaction that all the efforts at Zimmer and Peacock AS lead to products on the market, that make  a direct difference to our world.


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Mon

18

Jan

2021

Hiring USN trained Microfabrication Engineer

As  part of our continuing close relations with USN, ZP is looking to recruit a full time or part time post-graduate students/graduate students, who have gained a considerable degree of practical training within the  USN clean room facility.

 

You must be:

 

  • A USN graduate or currently studying at USN
  • You are at a senior level in regard to your experience and time spent within the USN clean room
  • You must be ready to work now, either  part-time or full-time

 

 DETAILED DESCRIPTION

 

Micro-fabrication Engineer

 

Micro-fabrication Engineer Job Responsibilities:

  • Micro-fabrication within cleanroom environment using dry etching machine, baking oven, sputter coating machine, thermal evaporation and copper plating machine.
  • Following existing microfabrication work instruction and possibility improvement of the current fabrication process.
  • Reporting fabrication process and drafting work instruction

Essential attributes:

  • More than two years’ experience in microfabrication.
  • More than two years’ experience of MEMS device design
  • Experience of bulk micromachining and fabrication processes with multiple stages of photolithography, dry etching, wet etching, baking, metal sputtering and metal plating, gained through working in a cleanroom environment.
  • Experience of using SEM and EDX to characterise fabricated device.
  • Ability to establish and develop new cleanroom processes.
  • Ability to present work at technical meetings.
  •  Ability to write work instruction.
  • Comfortable working unsupervised after initial training

 

 

 

Desirable attributes: 

  • Cross discipline working to identify potential process and device improvements
  • Ability to work in an interdisciplinary project team

 

 

 

Please complete this form to register interest.


Tue

12

Jan

2021

The Pursuit of Noninvasive Glucose - Hunting the Deceitful Turkey

For anyone working on a continuous glucose monitoring technology, whether implantable, trans-dermal, minimally invasive or even noninvasive then please do read 'The Pursuit of Noninvasive Glucose - Hunting the Deceitful Turkey' by John L. Smith.  You really can't claim to be in the CGM club until you have read this book.

 

At ZP we have been checking back into this book for about 15 years and we will often recommend it to others, especially those working on noninvasive glucose technology.

 

We have linked to the book in the buttons below and have included a button to ZP resources for anyone interested in CGM development.


Sun

10

Jan

2021

Gold electrodes for COVID-19 biosensor developers

At ZP we receive  a lot of enquires about gold electrode and their use as biosensors.

 

On this page we provide links specifically  for those wishing to develop a COVID-19 biosensor upon our gold electrodes, please see the buttons below.



Please click this button to see a discussion on cleaning gold screen printed electrodes.


Zimmer and Peacock is the only company that electrochemically characterises its screen printed electrode as part of the manufacturing process.


We have a resources page for people wishing to form a self-assembled monolayer on a gold electrode.


Sun

10

Jan

2021

Gold electrodes for impedance biosensors

At ZP we receive  a lot of enquires about gold electrode and there use as biosensors, along with the use of impedance spectroscopy to  read the sensor. Therefore  to help developers we have put this resources page together.


If you intend to use impedance measurements with gold electrodes then please watch this video.


Please click this button to see a discussion on cleaning gold screen printed electrodes.


Zimmer and Peacock is the only company that electrochemically characterises its screen printed electrode as part of the manufacturing process.


We have a resources page for people wishing to form a self-assembled monolayer on a gold electrode.


The print thickness of our gold screen printed electrodes can be found here.


The resistance of our  gold screen printed electrodes can be found here.


Wed

06

Jan

2021

FAQ for interns

At ZP we do recruit and train interns, here are some FAQs that we are sometimes asked.

FAQs

 

Is the start date same for all placement holders?

No, the start date varies for different candidates based on a skill-based segregation that we have made post assessment.

 

Base in Norway and UK?

We have our offices and labs in Horten, Norway.

We have our offices and labs in several locations in UK (Royston, London, Wolverhampton). The location for the candidates’ placement in UK is TBD.

 

How long would I be working in Norway?

The length of stay will be 3 months at a time alternated between Norway and UK throughout the placement.

The first training round will take place in Norway, wherein you will spend 3 months being trained and working in the Horten labs.

Then you will return to UK and spend the next 3 months working in a lab in the UK.

This cycle will continue through the placement period and the candidate is responsible for figuring out any visa requirements, although we may be able to provide some advice.

 

What costs will be covered by the company and what costs do we have to cover?

As per our company policy, we will cover only the cost of travel between UK and Norway (Flights, trains, bus, etc.).

All other costs have to be covered by the student. This includes visas, food and accommodation. If the university has a budget for covering this, you may ask or apply for it.

 

Is there accommodation readily available?

Yes, we will provide accommodation for the placements at a nominal rent.

If for some reason you choose not to stay at the accommodation provided by the company, it will be the candidate’s responsibility to manage their own accommodation.

The accommodation is a unisex (mixed-gender) house-share with individual rooms.

 

Are there other students that I will be working alongside in this placement?

Yes, there will be other students from your own and other universities working at ZP at the same time as you.

 

Can I change my start date?

This is not preferable as we will have to swap you over with another candidate, so this will be entertained if the circumstances can be explained and are considered essential.

 

What are the hours I will be working for?

The normal working hours are 9am-5pm with a break as per the government requirements but you can be requested to stay longer if required on certain days, but not extensively.

 

We do not offer overtime pay.

Mon

04

Jan

2021

<5 min COVID-19 Breath Test

Congratulations to Exhalation Technology for their less than 5 minute breath test for COVID-19.

 

The Exhalation team's clinical testing has shown amazing Clinical  sensitivity.


Thu

31

Dec

2020

ZP Screen printed electrode holder

ZP is delighted with these screen printed electrode (SPE) holders designed for our ZP biosensors and ZP screen printed electrodes.


Mon

28

Dec

2020

Tools for biosensor entrepreneurs

ZP is the world's leading independent ISO13485 contract developer and contract manufacturer of electrochemical biosensors and electrochemical in-vitro diagnostics. Therefore we are very used to working with start-ups and entrepreneurs. 

 

Below we have posted videos, links and materials that we have made specifically with biosensor entrepreneurs in mind.

 

If you are an entrepreneur with an electrochemical biosensor idea please don't hesitate to contact ZP.


Wed

23

Dec

2020

Chloride resilient formulation for silver/silver chloride reference electrodes

In the adjacent data we show the data screen printed silver/silver chloride electrode treated with ZP's chloride resilient formulation.

 

The intention of the chloride resilient formulation is to make the reference electrode less sensitive to chloride, which is useful in applications where the chloride is otherwise a variable.

raw data
chloride resilient raw data.xlsx
Microsoft Excel Table 39.5 KB

Fri

18

Dec

2020

ZP is hiring senior scientists and/or senior engineers

ZP is looking to hire senior scientists and/or senior engineers. 

 

In the first instance you will be working from our ZP AS site in Horten Norway, though you can expect to work both from London UK and Norway.

 

Technical positions at ZP are always fun and demanding, so you need to feel that you are world class, self motivated, a problem solver and a team player.

 

ZP has deliberately not specified your technical background as we find senior  scientists and engineers are not defined by their formal training, but rather by their wiliness to learn and self-educate through their careers. You can expect that you will be working on programmes where electrochemical biosensors is at the heart of the technology.

 

At ZP our unique expertise is electrochemical biosensors, so experience with this technology is an advantage, and if you would like to get a sense of our core science then please click the video link below.

 

If you are interested in finding out more please use the apply button below, and follow us on social media to see future opportunities.


Wed

16

Dec

2020

Working hard in the ZP Biosensor Labs

At ZP, our hardworking team  are constantly developing, manufacturing and shipping biosensors.

 

Wed

16

Dec

2020

Electroplating resources

Zimmer and Peacock has put together a resources pages around electroplating for medical devices. Please read more.


Wed

16

Dec

2020

Fully characterized screen printed electrodes

Zimmer and Peacock has had the working electrode of our hyper value screen printed electrode characterized by microscopy, please read more.


Tue

08

Dec

2020

FAQs on ZP pH sensors

At ZP we do get enquires about our electrochemical pH sensors, so we have made this page to answer some more FAQs.

 

 

QUESTION ONE  -  How many hours of continual use in simple aqueous solutions at pH 3-5 could the printed sensors withstand before significant degradation?

 

QUESTION TWO  -  How long would the sensor lifetime be in complex bio-fluids with additional ions (eg Na+, K+)?

 

QUESTION THREE - Can the sensors be reused (eg with a suitable washing step) or would you recommend one-time use?

 

QUESTION FOUR -  Approximately how many bending cycles can the pH sensor withstand?


Mon

07

Dec

2020

Medical Wearables

Zimmer and Peacock are the World Leader in contract development and manufacturing of wearables.

 

This week we are exhibiting at  Medical Wearables 2020.


Sat

05

Dec

2020

Internships at ZP

At Zimmer and Peacock we do offer internships, to see announcements on when we have internships available please do follow us on social media.

 

If you would like to join ZP on a permanent basis then the internship programme is a good way to find a place with us.


Sat

28

Nov

2020

Questions about phosphate sensors

In this article we have collected together some frequently asked questions regarding ZP's phosphate sensor.

 

 

 

1. Are your phosphate sensors intended for  agricultural or environmental applications?

 

Yes, see the ZP Ag Tech button below.

 

2. What measurement method is used?

 

See the phosphate sensor button below.

 

 

3. What are the LOD and linear range of the sensor?

 

This is a function of the sensor, electronics and application.

 

4. Are there any measurement interferences  (solution pH, dissolved oxygen, other Ions, etc.)?

 

Yes and these are application specific.

 

5. Would you please send me technical specification for this sensor?

 

Please see the phosphate sensor button.

 

6. Do you have any measurement examples to share, in which data from your sensor are compared to data from classical measurement methods?

 

See the ZP Ag Tech button below.

 

7. What are the calibration requirements?

 

Depends on the final application.

 

 

8. What is a sensor's response time?

 

 

Please see ZP's phosphate sensor button below.


Thu

26

Nov

2020

Thank you to NPL

This week, ZP would like to say thank you to the UK's National Physical Laboratory (NPL) for their recent work as part of the Measurement for Recovery (M4R) programme, which gives UK business access to world-leading measurement.

 

As part of a bigger programme to understand the performance of ZP's biosensors, the NPL team characterized a number of ZP's biosensors and screen printed electrodes, including our carbon 303 screen printed electrodes.

 

We were delighted with the work, because everyone  benefits from having another independent team taking a look at a problem. The NPL work directly identified ways of improving the reproducibility of our ZP sensors.

 

The NPL team are great as they have state of the art equipment, facilities and techniques. Their independence means that they don't carry 'internal team think' and so  bring a fresh perspective on a problem.

 

NPL have capabilities that go beyond microscopy and profilometry, including specialist techniques of  interest to the electrochemistry community including: scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS).

The SPE that was characterized by microscopy and profilometry was the ZP 303 carbon electrode.

 

In the adjacent images we have some images gathered for ZP by NPL.


Thu

26

Nov

2020

Designing a biosensor for protein detection using a screen printed electrode

On this page we lay out one strategy to functionalize a screen printed electrode towards sensing a protein.

 

Links relevant to the video are in the buttons below.


Wed

25

Nov

2020

Calculating the cost of a first screen printing run

This page is designed to help you calculate the price for a first custom screen printing run at Zimmer and Peacock.

 

When you first have a batch of screen printed electrodes manufactured you have the non-recurring engineering charge (NRC).

 

The NRC is the one off costs of making the screens so we can print your electrodes, and the cost of the engineers to convert your designs into screens.

 

After the NRC is the cost of making the electrodes themselves. Please watch the video where we explain how to calculate the cost of a first run of screen printed electrodes at ZP.

 

Below we have six  buttons:

 

1) The cost of screens

2) The cost of engineering time

3) The cost to print on PET

4) The cost to print on ceramic

5) Our standard value electrode format

6) Our standard hyper value electrode format


Mon

23

Nov

2020

Raw material purification

This week our facility in Norway received  new lab equipment to support our lab engineers in their research and development. 

 

At ZP we have to make repeatable biosensors to exacting standards, and so we can't just use the starting materials as received, therefore we have added a rotary evaporator to the lab took kit to help with: extraction, purification and distillation.

 

 

Mon

23

Nov

2020

Parallel electrochemical processing

At Zimmer and Peacock we work with 12 channel Ana Pot and test jig to maximize our throughput.

 

Our test jigs are developed in house by our engineers to ensure that we can be as efficient as possible.

 

If you want to maximize your efficiency please contact ZP.


Mon

23

Nov

2020

Shipping biosensors this week

Zimmer and Peacock is the leading contract developer of electrochemical biosensors.

 

On our website you will find a wide range of biosensors for example glucose, lactate and potassium. If their is anything you can't find please do not hesitate to contact us.

 


Thu

19

Nov

2020

Electropolymerization and the formation of MIPS

In this video we discuss MIPs and their formation by electropolymerization.


Sun

15

Nov

2020

Designing an electrochemical sensor for protein detection

Here are some notes on how to design a system for the electrochemical measurement of proteins.

 

 

1. Which electrode materials  are useful for the measurement of proteins?

 

 

2. What  dimensions and geometry of the electrodes will make it suitable to the detection of proteins?

 

 

3. How to increase the sensitivity of the device towards the protein of interest?

 

 

4. How to minimize the interference from other proteins?

 

 

5. How to minimize non-specific binding and film formation that would otherwise confound the sensor?


Tue

10

Nov

2020

ZP welcome new members

At Zimmer and Peacock we are a constantly growing and on the look out for new team members to join us. This week we have had training and a walk through of our facility in Norway for our new members.

 

If you are interested in becoming a team member of our fantastic team, or looking for the right product for your research please don't hesitate to contact us. 

 

 

Sun

08

Nov

2020

Questions regarding screen printed pH sensors

At ZP we try to support the development and startup community so here are the answers to some commonly asked questions.

 

 

1. Is the ZP screen printed pH sensor single use or can it be re-used? Please comment on the the shelf life/operational  life of the sensor?

 

2. What is the pH range of the ZP screen printed pH sensor?
 
3. What is the necessary power  for using the sensor?
  
4. What is the measurement time of the pH sensor?
 
5.The pH sensor is potentiometric, how should I connect to it?
 
6. Does ZP recommend a  connector  to connect the sensor to a PCB?

 


IMPORTANT - If you are considering buying the ZP screen printed pH sensors please also purchase the ZP pH test solutions, this will mean ZP can properly support you especially when it comes to troubleshooting.

For those wishing to understand biosensors, including glucose and pH sensors in greater detail please click the link and watch our webinar 'Introduction to Electrochemical Biosensors and Demonstration.


Tue

03

Nov

2020

Accessories for 12 channel biosensor testing

At ZP we are passionate about developing tools and accessories for biosensors. We understand that you can't develop and test sensors one at a time, and so we develop the necessary tools to test 12 sensors at  a time, so that you can build up the statistical confidence in your technology. 

 


Mon

02

Nov

2020

Pros and Cons of screen printed electrodes

We were asked a very interesting question today at ZP to list the pros and cons of screen printed electrodes. The questions was '...what are the positives and negatives of screen printed electrodes when used for amperometric sensing...'

 

This was an interesting question so we answered it below:


Pros

  • Screen printed electrodes can be low cost once a lot of engineering efforts has been  been invested into them see Hyper Value and Value Sensor.

Cons

  • The perceived low cost of screen printed electrodes means that the quality of electrodes in the R and D community is in fact not that high.

  • There are companies that can print electrodes.
  • Many screen printing companies are not able to electrochemical test screen printed electrodes.

  • The quality of screen printed electrodes can be high.
  • Quality can be variable both from screen printed electrode to electrode and batch to batch variation, especially those offered to the R and D community

  • Applicable to amperometric and potentiometric sensors
  • Applicable to amperometric and potentiometric sensors, but if the manufacturing is variable it will effect the sensors raw signal, please see video.


Fri

30

Oct

2020

Questions regarding glucose sensors

We had some questions regarding glucose sensors from ZP, which are summarized here ...

 

Question 1 - What is the lifespan of this sensor?

 

Answer 1 - The answer to this question depends on whether you are referring to shelf-life or operational life.

We are linking to our main glucose sensor page below as it includes the datasheet which contains a lot of information and also on the page we have data showing the sensor in continuous operation for 48 hours.

 


Question 2 - Do I need to follow any maintenance or safety protocols while using this sensor or after the sensor usage?

 

Answer 2 - The sensors are intended to be used in a laboratory setting so good laboratory practice (GLP) should be followed, and personal protective equipment (PPE) as prescribed by your laboratory safety officer should be worn in your lab. Viewing the videos above should help. In addition there is  a comment regarding safety in the data sheet available on the main glucose sensor page. The sensors can be rinsed after use for storage, please see the button below.


Question 3 - Please tell me some analytical data regarding the sensor:

  • Linearity interval
  • LoD
  • LoQ
  • Operation stability

Answer 3


Wed

14

Oct

2020

ZP pH Sensors and Sensit Smart from PalmSens

On this page we discuss the use of ZP pH Sensors with the PalmSens Sensit powered by Analog Devices.

pH Sensor Test Kit

 

10 x solid state pH sensors.

1 x volume of pH 10 solution..

1 x volume of pH 4 solution.

150,00 €
Add to Cart
  • Available
  • Generally ships within 2-4 weeks

In the video below ZP shows how the Sensit Smart  from PalmSens and Powered by Analog Devices can be use to monitor pH.


Mon

05

Oct

2020

Chemical and biochemical sensors for condition monitoring

Condition monitoring is intended to extend the life time and up time of equipment, including machines, by continuously monitoring their condition, such as vibration and temperature, and using the data to see as a machine is moving away from its normal state (baseline data) and showing signs/signals of a developing fault. This process of monitoring is a major component of predictive maintenance. Parameters that are currently used to monitor the condition of machinery  includes: temperature, vibration and current/voltage through a model based voltage and current systems (MVBI systems). 

The sensors for temperature and vibration tracking have been available for decades, but at ZP we see a that the sensors for monitoring the chemical state of the machine system are not so readily available or are not developed.

 

At Zimmer and Peacock we are interested in sensors that can measure the chemical condition of a machine, including parameters such as corrosion and the condition of the lubricants.

 

At ZP we are interested in exploring with clients condition monitoring using our standard sensors including our conductivity sensors for lubricant and fuel condition monitoring.


Wed

30

Sep

2020

ZP Glucose Sensors and Sensit Smart from PalmSens

On this page we discuss the use of ZP Glucose Sensors with the PalmSens Sensit powered by Analog Devices.

Glucose Sensor Test Kit

10 x generation one glucose sensors.

1 x volume of 20 mM glucose solution.

1 x volume of 0 mM glucose solution.

150,00 €
Add to Cart
  • Available
  • Generally ships within 2-4 weeks

Each kit comes with a complementary coupon code allowing you to access the ZP glucose sensor training module for free at the ZP Academy.


Click the button to source the Sensit potentiostat


In the video below ZP shows how the Sensit Smart  from PalmSens and Powered by Analog Devices can be use to monitor the glucose/sugar in Coca-Cola.

Below ZP shows how the Sensit Smart  from PalmSens and Powered by Analog Devices can be used in conjunction with the ZP glucose sensor kit to develop glucose and potentially other biosensing applications.


In the video we do a show and tell on what is in the ZP Glucose Sensor Kit: 10 glucose sensors and two test solutions.

In the video below we give an technical description of the generation one glucose sensor.


Fri

04

Sep

2020

Register for our upcoming webinar

ZP has the largest range of off-the-shelf solutions for people intending to develop wearable and transdermal biosensors

 

As part of our support of industrial and academic developers we will be hosting another webinar including a live demo of wearable tech; the topic for this latest webinar will be ‘Introduction to Wearable Biosensors and Transdermal Biosensor’.

 

Please register for the webinar below.


Sun

30

Aug

2020

Crossing two chasms to get to the sensor and biosensor market

At ZP we are passionate about translating ideas around sensing into products. Our focus is biosensors and sensors and so this presentation focuses on difficulties with getting ideas to the market. This presentation is based on original ideas of Geoffrey Moore in his book 'Crossing the Chasm'.

Click the image to find this book online.


Thu

27

Aug

2020

Halal Biosensors

This week we had a very interesting webinar for our ZP Developer Zone Members, and the subject was Halal Biosensors/Sensors. We discussed alcohol sensors and DNA sensors for pork adulteration/contamination. In the adjacent video we discuss the development of Halal Sensors.


Mon

24

Aug

2020

How to detect APIs using electrochemistry and screen printed electrodes

In this video we discuss how to detect a pharmaceutical drug/API using electrochemical techniques specifically we recommend using a carbon electrode.

 

Links to pages we use in the video are below.


Mon

24

Aug

2020

Sensors and biosensors machine learning implementation life cycle

ZP is accelerating our collaborators to market through a combination of off the shelf biosensor products, electronics combined with customization development and manufacturing services, all focused around our core competency of electrochemical sensing and  biosensing.

 

Two of the tactics we deploy at ZP is to develop the best sensors we can, but to also apply the best data codes and models to the raw data. To this aim ZP is a leader in the application of machine learning to sensor and biosensor product development.

 

In the adjacent image we show the Machine Learning Implementation Life Cycle that we apply into our clients product development.



Mon

24

Aug

2020

ZP @Sensors in Medicine 2020

ZP is speaking on Thursday 22 October at the Sensors in Medicine 2020, where we will be talking in the wearables and implantable sensors session.

 

Click the buttons below to find out more.


Mon

20

Jul

2020

SPE conductivity sensors

At ZP we are a world leader in the manufacture of screen printed electrodes (SPE). In this data we show how our SPEs can be used as conductivity sensors, in the data we also compare against a traditional conductivity probe.

 

In the buttons below we show links to the electrodes used in this study.



Thu

16

Jul

2020

ZP - Manufacturing data for solid state pH sensors

At ZP we manufacture our pH solid state pH  within our ISO13485 quality management system, applying our standard operating procedures/work instructions and our acceptance criteria. To characterize our solid state pH sensors manufacturing ZP has carried out a multi-step investigation.

 

 

STEP ONE - Manufacturing phase

ZP performed a manufacturing step where we manufactured three batches of 108 pH sensors on three different days.

 

 

STEP TWO - Testing phase

Next ZP functionally tested five random sensors from each batch. The solid state pH sensors were tested with pH solutions between pH 2 to pH 10, please see adjacent raw data.   As a side note ZP is unusual in that we have both high-throughput manufacturing capability and high-throughput testing capability, click here. This functional test capability was used in this study.

 

STEP THREE - Data processing phase

Having gathered the data ZP then used our data processing group to apply a mathematical baseline correction to the data, where we mathematically moved all of the data to a baseline of 0 V at the initial pH 2, please see the adjacent data.

This baseline correction is equivalent to a one point calibration. It should be noted that an even more accurate way of calibrating pH sensors is of course to perform a two point calibration, but it was unnecessary for this study. Click here to see our data group.

 

STEP FOUR - Data analysis phase

Having processed the data ZP next analysed the data.

 

ZP has a very sophisticated set of technologies and workflows in-house for the conversion of data into actionable information, click here to find out more.

 

STEP FIVE -  Reporting results phase

The result of our testing was that across all three batches and having performed a single baseline correction 75 % of all the sensors within the population of 324 pH sensors gave  a measured result that was within 85 % of the actual result, i.e. for a pH of 7, the overwhelming majority of the pH sensors from the three batches would read a value in the range 5.95 to 8.05.

STEP TWO

STEP THREE

STEP FOUR



Sun

12

Jul

2020

Commercializing a sensor for antibiotic detection

We recently had a an enquiry on how to commercialise a biosensor for antibiotic detection.

 

We have paraphrased the enquiry below, on this page we give a quick response.

 

... how can we manufacture electrochemical biosensors for antibiotics detection in water bodies , specially how can we make them low cost

 

1) what will be the manufacturing process 

 

2) how much time it will take to manufacture them

 

3) what resources are required for manufacturing,... like plant building, land or amount of space required and people required for manufacturing processes

 

4) what can be its estimated shelf life 

 

5) how can we design it 

 

 


Wed

24

Jun

2020

The cost to bring a medical diagnostic onto the market

At ZP we perform contract development and manufacturing of electrochemical biosensors, one of the questions we are regularly  asked is 'what does it cost to bring  medical diagnostic onto the market?'

 

In answering that questions we can use our industrial experience, , and we can use the opinions and data from other world leaders in this field. In this article we reference  excellent article on the Diaceutics website which can be found here.

 

 

 

 

ARTICLE FROM DIACEUTICS

 

The original article is here - click here.

 

In the adjacent table we have read and understood the information from Diaceutics and added our own take on their numbers.

 

You can see that Diaceutics gave a value in the range $20 M to $100 M.

 


CONCLUSION

 

At ZP we are always excited to work with clients who are ambitious and are driving to the market, and of course we want to support people on this road. We hope that these notes will help people in their buisness planning and their buisness models.

 

If you have questions regarding ZP's contract development and manufacturing services for IVD, please don't hesitate to contact us.  


Mon

01

Jun

2020

Sensors for water quality

Zimmer and Peacock has the worlds widest range of electrochemical sensors and biosensors on the market. Our customers, clients and collaborators  can engage with our technology, either by:

 

1) Partnering with us through one of our off the shelf solutions.

 

2) Contracting with us to develop and manufacture a bespoke sensor.

 

Below we link to the sensors and electronics appropriate to developers of water quality monitoring applications.

 

The sensors in the ZP biosensor range applicable in water quality applications include: conductivity/salinity, sodium, potassium, phosphate, ammonium, calcium, pH, chloride and oxygen.  If you can't see the sensor you are looking for please don't hesitate to contact us.





Fri

22

May

2020

Searching for potential CEOs

The ZP Group is under going massive growth, but we know that the foundation of growth is having  excellent clients and an excellent team, where our team is  delivering world leading services and products to our clients.  

 

For the ZP Group growth to be sustainable we fully appreciate that we have to increase our team and our network and so we are reaching out through  our primary, secondary and tertiary connections for individuals who can participate in leading our spin out ventures. 

 

We have a number of internal and external programs within the ZP group that are maturing and will require substantial funding, but ZP understands that funding needs to be linked to an effective CEO; that is why ZP is reaching out through our network for people with the intelligence, drive and organisational skills to be part of seeding and running new ventures.

 

The ZP Group is focused on electrochemical biosensors and the real world applications of these sensors, so please assume that you would be coming into a rich ecosystem of engineering and scientists centered around the deployment of sensor and the delivery of sensing data into business and/or consumer actionable information.

 

At ZP we know that  the conversion of world  beating capability into market ready products and services will take great leadership, energy and focus from individual who can share a vision.

 

If you want to start exploring the next step in your life, with a view to seeding and running a business, please don’t hesitate to contact Even or Martin through linked in.


Please click click below to contact Even on LinkedIn

Please click below to contact Martin on LinkedIn


Sat

16

May

2020

Hydrogen peroxide sensors for vaporized hydrogen peroxide applications

Vaporized hydrogen peroxide (VHP)/hydrogen peroxide vapor (HPV) is used as a broad spectrum anti-microbial, and is used to decontaminate small objects to entire hospital wards.   The use of VHP has risen to prominence during COVID-19 pandemic. It is considered a means by which to sterilize the Corona virus.

 

The hydrogen peroxide is passed onto the sample or into the ambient environment in the form of a vapor by a VHP generator.  The issue is that many of the hydrogen peroxide generators on the market generate vapor in the range 140 ppm to 1400 ppm during their decontamination cycle, and this needs to be cleared before an area can be re-entered. A VHP concentration of 75 ppm or more is considered immediately dangerous to human health and life.  An area is considered safe to enter once the VHP is < 1 ppm.

 

Zimmer and Peacock provides a VHP hydrogen peroxide sensor, intended to be used by manufacturers in their VHP applications and products..

Hydrogen Peroxide Sensors - VHP

Hydrogen Peroxide sensors for VHP  applications where the sensor is disposable or where continuous measurement is required.

195,00 €
Add to Cart
  • 1 kg
  • Available
  • Generally ships within 2-4 weeks
VHP - ZP hydrogen peroxide sensor datasheet
ZP - H2O2 sensor.pdf
Adobe Acrobat Document 123.1 KB

Fri

15

May

2020

ZP Cell

The ZP Group is looking to grow our geographical network and reach in part through our ZP Cell Network.

 

Our ZP Cell Network is looking for talented scientists and engineers, with a background and/or an interest in electrochemical biosensors who want to collaborate with the ZP Group.

 

ZP has a global customer base and so we are looking for truly entrepreneurial scientists or engineers geographically distributed, who can engage with our ZP team and support our clients and programs in their region. 

 

 

If you are interested to be part of our ZP Cell Network, please contact us.


Fri

08

May

2020

ZP - Self Assembled Monolayer Biosensors Developers' Resource Page

Welcome to ZP's resource page for developer of biosensors who are looking to develop a biosensor on a gold electrode, using self assembled monolayers. 

 

The principles that summarize the content of this page includes, the electrochemical detection of biologically relevant molecules through the specific binding of an analytes to a surface, where the detection technique is electrochemical. The techniques we promote include: electrochemical  impedance spectroscope (EIS), differential pulse voltammetry (DPV), square wave voltammetry (SWV), chronoamperometry (CA), etc.


In the buttons below we have provided short cuts to material and information on ZP's website that we see as relevant. We also include our contact button, please do contact us as a thirty minute online chat can save you months of effort and get you on the right path to success and commercialization.

How to form a SAM layer.

Recommended potentiostats.

Obtaining a signal.

Contact us.

The actual experiment  can be quite simple as shown in this illustrative video.


Tue

21

Apr

2020

Questions to ZP regarding biosensors

ZP had a series of questions regarding our sensors, which are listed below so we decided to answer them in a video, see the questions here.

 

 glucose,

1. Resolution:

2. limit of detection:5mM

3. redox potentials:

4. Interval concentration: 0-20mM

5. etc

 

 lactate, 

1. Resolution:

2. limit of detection: 1 mM

3. redox potentials:

4. Interval concentration: 0-4 mM

5. etc

 

 

sodium and 

 

1. Resolution:

2. limit of detection: 40 mM

3. redox potentials:

4. Interval concentration: 0 - 360 mM

5. Sensitivity:  0.02 Log (C)/mV

6. etc:

 

 

potassium

1. Resolution:

2. limit of detection: 2.7 mM

3. redox potentials:

4. Interval concentration: 0-7 mM

5. etc

Click below to see our range of sensors.

If you have any questions please contact ZP.

 

 


Wed

15

Apr

2020

Direct SARS-CoV-2 Detection - COVID-19

At  ZP and Aliksir we are manufacturing our first batch of electrochemical biosensors for the direct detection of SARS-CoV-2 as our contribution towards the fight against COVID-19.

 

Our rapid development of this sensor was made possible because ZP's  team has now been together for over six years and delivered on over fourty biosensor development  and manufacturing programmes. The ZP team spans from biology through electrochemistry and electromechanical  to quality engineering.

 

For this sensor to truly be impactful we are looking for companies and entrepreneurs who have the vision and resources to take this all the way  to market with us.

 

Please don't hesitate to contact us if you have a vision to get this thing beat.


Mon

13

Apr

2020

Electrochemical RT-PCR detection for COVID-19

Welcome to our discussion on the electrochemical detection of COVID-19 using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

 

Though PCR is entering the widely used lexicon it is not always understood; a simple definition of PCR is a method by which DNA can be amplified so that it can subsequently detected or measured. The term amplification in this context means that the amount of DNA is increased (multiplied) by the polymerase chain reaction.

 

There is a hyphenated version of PCR, which is relevant when discussing COVID-19, this is real time PCR, also known as quantitative PCR (qPCR). In qPCR it is possible to measure the amount DNA as a function of time/cycles.  The time it takes for DNA to be detected is proportional to the amount of target DNA in the original sample and so the real-time PCR/qPCR can be a quantitative. 

 

Of course, COVID-19 a virus and hence has RNA as opposed to DNA. Therefore, when you look at the tests on the market for the detection of an active COVID-19 infection many are best described as RT-PCR, where the RT stands for reverse transcriptase. The sequence of events in aCOVID-19 RT-PCR is that the COVID-19 RNA first undergoes transcription from RNA to DNA, and subsequently the DNA is amplified (multiplied) and in real time the amplification of the DNA is measured.

 

A flaw in RT-PCR detection of COVID-19 is that it often involves a fluorescent t dye, and it is the binding of this dye to the amplified DNA from the PCR, which is the source of the signal. The issue is that it is hard to make fluorescent base instruments low cost and portable. When you look at the list of commercial fluorescent-based RT-PCR instruments for COVID-19 the smallest are tabletop units, and none can be described as handheld and low cost.

 

What is required is a small handheld COVID-19 RT-PCR instrument with the same costs and size as a glucose meter.  In order to achieve this the detection science has to be transferred from fluorescence to electrochemistry. All handheld glucose meters on the market are based on the science of bio-electrochemistry, which allows them to be manufactured at relatively low prices.

 

To convert a fluorescence RT-PCR to an electrochemical RT-PCR is straightforward with a lot of examples in the literature, and a simple google search on ‘electrochemical RT-PCR’ will yield pages of academic hits.

 

At ZP we have a number of technologies available through our webstore to help those wishing to develop low cost RT-PCR COVID-19 tests using electrochemistry, please don’t hesitate to contact us.

 


Thu

09

Apr

2020

COVID-19 biosensor developers resource centre

There are concerns that the COVID-19 lateral flow antibody tests are not as clinically useful as first hoped, and that bench top PCR tests are not as scalable as the necessary for all the testing COVID-19  will demand.

 

This means that there is a need for quick and easy to use biosensors, which are as manufacturable  as glucose sensors.

 

Zimmer and Peacock's business model is to partner with companies and entrepreneurs to rapidly develop and commercialize biosensors, using materials and manufacturing techniques otherwise used in glucose strip manufacturing.

 

On this page we provide a series of links useful to any companies or individuals interested in developing and manufacturing a COVID-19 biosensor.

 

If you have any questions regarding the content of these pages please don't hesitate to contact us.


THE SENSOR

 

The classic way to functionalise an electrode towards a virus of interest is to immobilize an appropriate macro-molecule to the surface of an electrode. The function of the macro-molecules to give the electrode specificity towards COVID-19.

 

The technology commonly used to immobilize macro-molecules to electrodes is SAM (self-assembled mono-layer).

 

In the adjacent buttons we provide some information on anyone thinking of developing a COVID-19 biosensors using gold electrodes and SAM technology.

THE ASSAY

 

Zimmer and Peacock's philosophy for COVID-19 assay development is try and keep it simple. Therefore in the adjacent button we discuss a philosophy on how to design a viral assay, whilst keeping it simple.

THE ELECTRONICS

Zimmer and Peacock has a wide range of electronics for COVID-19 biosensor developers, from their R and D phase through to their product launch.

 

We have included some useful buttons here, but we would highlight the FoodSense platform, as this platform has a readiness level that is useful within the timescale of the current COVID-19 crisis.

CONTRACT DEVELOPMENT AND MANUFACTURING SERVICES

Zimmer and Peacock is a dynamic team of IVD developers and manufacturers, if you want to discuss your development and manufacturing needs for a COVID-19 assay please don't hesitate to contact us.


Thu

09

Apr

2020

ZP technologies for the analysis of wine

At Zimmer and Peacock we are experts in developing and manufacturing electrochemical biosensors. One of the  strength of the company is our broad understanding of applications including the analysis of wines.

 

Many of the aromatic molecules within wine including the polyphenols, tannins, anthocyanins, flavonoids are detectable by our technology. At the same time our sulfite in wine  and pH sensing technology can augment the characterization of wine.

 

ZP can implement our core technology either for discrete single point testing or in a continuous analysis mode where the wine is monitored as a function of time.

 

 

We have put some buttons below to help people explore our wine centric expertise and technologies, including  a link to our AI technology. We see wine and  AI being a powerful combination  due to the complex chemical matrix of wine.

 



Thu

02

Apr

2020

What is the selectivity of ion-selective electrodes (ISE)?

Selectivity of ISE

 

When answering the question 'what is the selectivity of an ISE?' it is useful to use the selectivity coefficient.

 

The higher the selectivity coefficient value of, k, the more selective the ISE is towards X relative to A.

 

Sodium ISE

If we use the example of the ZP sodium ISE, then we have the following selectivity coefficients:

 

  • Na,K 0.6
  • Na,NH4+ 0.2
  • Na,Ca2+ 0.02
  • Na,Mg2+ 0.03

These selectivities   can be interpreted by understanding the ratios of these ions within the application, e.g. if the Na/K ratio is > 20 then there is no significant interference of potassium ions with the ZP sodium sensor.

 

Similarly if the Na/NH4+ ratio >10, then again there is no significant interference from ammonium and finally if the Na/Mg or Ca ratio is >1 then there is no significant interference of these ions to the ZP sodium sensor.

 

Whether the ZP sodium ISE is specific enough relative to ions such as potassium  depends on the application of interest. If we consider sea water or blood then the sodium to potassium ratio is intrinsically high.  In the case of blood the sodium concentration is approximate 135 mM whilst the potassium concentration is approximately 4 mM , therefore the Na/K ratio  = 34, so the ZP sodium ISE sensors is not effected by potassium within this application.

 

Potassium ISE

 

The ZP potassium ISE uses a very selective ionophore, and so the selectivity coefficient of the ZP potassium sensors means an excellent selectivity towards potassium in the prescence of other ions, as reflected in the selectivity coefficients:

 

  • k K,Na 0.0004
  • k K,NH4+ 0.01
  • K,Ca2+ 0.003
  • K,Mg2+ 0.0001

 

 

 

Zimmer and Peacock has a large range of ISE among withinour sensors catalog, please click the button below to search our range of biosensors including ISE.


Tue

31

Mar

2020

ZP Lab - Sensor, Biosensor and IVD Incubator

ZP AS launches an onsite and online  biosensor incubator.

 

ZP AS has launched the world’s first biosensor and IVD incubator both onsite and online. We are living in a IoT revolution where everything will be connected to the Cloud/internet and where data will be continuously streamed and translated into actionable information in real time by AI.

The issue is that when you survey the world’s sensor landscape you find that whilst there are thousands of condition sensors such as temperature, pressure, locations, movement sensors etc there is a distinct lack of chemical and biochemical sensors. The irony is that most of the data streams that are commercially interesting are the biological, biochemical and chemical data, but the necessary sensors such as: glucose, lactate, oxygen, hydrogen peroxide, pH, nitrate, phosphate, potassium, sodium calcium, alcohol, redox, etc were not commercially available.  At ZP we have many of the biological, biochemical and chemical sensors that would otherwise be missing from the commercial landscape.  Our business model has always been to accelerate our customers and clients to market and so we have these sensors on the shelf so that companies and entrepreneurs can quickly test an idea or a concept and not be inhibited by the lack of a sensor.

Our experience at ZP is that companies, academics and entrepreneurs will buy and try one of our off the shelf sensors, gather some proof-of-principle data and then move forward with us to develop a sensor that are more tailored towards their idea, market and application.

 

At ZP we are by default a collaborative business and we know that we will move faster and more efficiently with partnerships and so we are delighted to announce our efforts to start rolling out the ZP Incubator. Our incubator is intended to help entrepreneurs, companies and start-ups to get going faster and more efficiently on their sensor ideas.

 

To apply to join the ZP Incubator you do need to meet a minimum of three criteria:

 

• CRITERIA ONE – You must an idea or a technology that involves an electrochemical sensor.

• CRITERIA TWO – You must have an idea that has commercial merit with a path to market.

• CRITERIA THREE – You must have a source of funding to get you some way to the market.

Please do note that meeting these three criteria does not guarantee an acceptance to join the incubator, but please do try.

Our first onsite incubator is located next to our ZP AS HQ in Norway. If you join our hub you will have access to a team, equipment, technology and manufacturing capability able to take you to market

 

If you would like to contact ZP regarding our ZP Incubator, please contact us.

Sun

29

Mar

2020

The cyclic voltammetry of ferricyanide/ferrocyanide

In this video we show you how to run a first experiment for ferri/ferrocyanide on a ZP potentiostat and screen printed electrode.

 

All the equipment used in the video can be found here.


Sun

29

Mar

2020

PhD - Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Graphene-Protein interactions for Biomedical Diagnostic Sensors

Applications are invited for a three-year MPhil/PhD studentship. The studentship will start on 1 st October 2020.

Project Description

Fundamental understanding of protein dynamics, energy landscape and conformational changes, is central to deeper insights into a protein’s specific biochemical functions (such as allosteric signalling, enzyme catalysis etc.). This could aid in drug discovery, novel protein engineering and distinguishing between normal and pathogenic conformational changes for disease diagnostics applications. In this project we aim to investigate a novel approach for the detection of protein dynamics and interactions on the surface of Graphene (and related two-dimensional materials, G2DM) through direct comparison of Molecular Dynamics Simulations (MDS) with experimental results obtained from our G2DM based sensors developed at the University of Plymouth in collaboration with the University of Cambridge.

For the MDS we will employ the Kohn–Sham (KS) formalism of the density functional theory approach to perform the in-silicio study of the graphene-protein system. The KS approach has proven to be one of the most efficient and reliable first-principles methods for investigating material properties and processes that exhibit quantum mechanical behaviour. The pioneering

nature of this research will enable the student to use BigDFT massively parallel electronic structure code to simulate the graphene-protein sensor, based on the High Performance Computing Cluster at the University of Plymouth, as well as making comparisons with cutting edge experimental measurements. Accurate comparisons between MDS and experimental

results has the potential to lead to a breakthrough in our understanding of protein dynamics and conformational states, thus opening a plethora of applications in diagnostics, prognostics and therapeutics particularly for Alzheimer’s, cancer and cardiovascular diseases. 

CLICK THIS DOCUMENT TO FIND OUT MORE

portsmouth PhD
Adobe Acrobat Document 289.6 KB

Thu

19

Mar

2020

Testing and validating a COVID-19 Diagnostics

At Zimmer and Peacock we have a can do attitude and so during this COVID-19 pandemic we are busy validating biosensor solutions to help protect public health.

 

We do understand that the best solution is a vaccine but until that is readily available ZP will do it's part and continue to validate the COVID-19 test.


Wed

05

Feb

2020

USN - Introduction to Biosensors

Thank you for attending our talk today at USN, please download the presentation here.

 

If you are interested in having a collaboration with ZP please contact us.

 

Please download the presentation here.

 

Zimmer and Peacock Biosensor Workshop_US
Adobe Acrobat Document 7.1 MB

Thu

14

Nov

2019

Setting up a wearable sensor

Recently one of our engineers walked a client through the set up of their ecFLEX - a wearable biosensor platform.

 

In this note we report the guidance that the engineer gave.

 

STEP ONE - Connect the ecFLEX to the sensor.

 

STEP TWO -  Connect the battery to the ecflex using the crocodile clips (the black crocodile clip is isolated underneath to avoid shorting) and keep the black crocodile clip on the side near the components.

 

STEP THREE- Once the ecFLEX is powered download the readout software.


STEP FOUR - Once the readout software is up and running, you have to press scan and find your ecflex listed (Tx should be higher than -127 dBm).

 

 


STEP FIVE - You connect to your device by double clicking the name of your device and waiting for the settings to upload (everything will be automatic, you do not need to change anything in the software settings). Once the device is connected, the Tx will show -127 dBm so do not worry:


Lastly one of our engineers put out a super useful video on YouTube, please watch to lean more.


Thu

31

Oct

2019

Vaporized hydrogen peroxide detector

ZP's hydrogen peroxide sensor for vaporized hydrogen peroxide detection  is a handheld mobile system that can be deployed to measure the hydrogen peroxide vapour in an atmosphere.

 

ZP's VHP meter can be deployed during decontamination to check  the vapour hydrogen peroxide levels, and post decontamination to ensure that levels are safe for  operators. 

 

ZP's VHP meter is unique as the world's only handheld portable VMP meter. Further it is the only meter to use enzyme technology to detect hydrogen peroxide so is inherently the most specific hydrogen peroxide meter on the market.

 

The ZP cartridge system means that the hydrogen peroxide sensor can easily be replaced in the field and avoids  having to send sensors back to the factory for calibration.


Fri

18

Oct

2019

How to connect to a microneedle array?

At Zimmer and Peacock we appreciate the importance of having a good connection between your microneedle array and your electronics,so that you can have the best possible signal.

 


Sun

29

Sep

2019

Ion-Selective Electrodes (ISE) and Ion-selective Field Effect Transistors (ISFETS)

So many of the biosensors from Zimmer and Peacock fall  into the category of Ion- Selective Electrodes (ISE), at the time of writing the list includes: pH, potassium, sodium, chloride, calcium, nitrate, ammonium and phosphate.

 

Some of the these ISE sensors can be seen in action by clicking  the button below.

See our range of sensors, including  our ISE sensors here.


At Zimmer and Peacock we have a lot of characterization data, some of which is on our website, but if you can't find what you are looking for please contact us.


One of the technical advantages of the ZP ISE is that they can come with a chloride resilient electrode, so that the sensors can be used in applications where the chloride ei sunnow or uncontrolled.


Sun

29

Sep

2019

Low cost sensors for IoT and scientific instrumentation

When people talk about multiple sensor system and the IoT they are describing multiple sensors monitoring a system be it a body of water, a manufacturing process etc.

Traditional chemical sensors, such as the glass barrel pH sensor, do not translate well into multiple  sensor networks. This is because traditional sensors were originally designed for lab applications, where low cost and robustness were not considerations alongside functionality and accuracy.

At ZP we know that when you combine electrochemical sensing technology with low cost manufacturing principles you are able to manufacture a sensor with the right cost and functionality. 

 

 

 

 

 

 


At ZP we have an extensive range of sensors, where the fundamental technology and manufacturing principles makes them perfect for those working on sensor network products.


Wed

24

Jul

2019

Resources for the Electrochemical Sciences

At Zimmer and Peacock we are focused on electrochemistry, both from the research perspective but also from the commercialisation perspective.

 

Below we have linked to resources on our website regarding electrochemistry be it:

 

1) Energy Conversion and Storage - Fuel Cells, Bio-fuel cells, Batteries and Flow Batteries, Electro-catalysis and Photo-electrocatalysis.

 

2) Photo-electrochemistry - Solar Cells, Perovskite, and alternative Solar Cells.

 

3) Corrosion - Marine Corrosion, Coatings, Paints, Polymers.

 

Please click the buttons below to access extra resources or contact us to ask specific questions


Mon

20

May

2019

Heavy Metal Detection

One of the keywords that describes us at Zimmer and Peacock is electrochemistry and so we approach the development of sensors and sensing from an electrochemist's perspective. That is why when people ask us can we provide or develop a sensors for heavy metal detection the answer is YES, but most importantly we also approach the answer form the perspective than for an electrochemist heavy metal detection is an 'easy' and well understood technology.

 

In the adjacent image we show the wave form and expected raw data from analysing a solution of heavy metals.

 

The technique that we recommend is anodic stripping which is an analytical technique that involves preconcentration of a metal onto an electrode surface followed by selective oxidation of each metal during an anodic potential sweep. 

Stripping analysis has the following properties: 

  1. Sensitive and reproducible (RSD<5%) method for trace metal ion analysis in aqueous media.
  2. Concentration limits of detection for many metals are in the low ppb to high ppt range (S/N=3) and this compares favourably with AAS or ICP analysis.
  3. Field deployable instrumentation that is inexpensive, approximately 12-15 metal ions can be analysed for by this method. 

The method is quantitative a the stripping peak currents and peak widths are a function of the metal concentration in solution.


In the buttons below we have linked to the instrument and electrodes for starting your development, if you have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock please don't hesitate to contact us.

 

 

Fri

03

May

2019

pH sensor stability and calibrating a pH sensor

At ZP we are often asked what is the accuracy of the ZP electrochemical sensors and biosensors, but the answer to the question is 'how do you intend to use them?'. The accuracy of an electrochemical biosensor is a function of the sensor, your sample and your system in which you place the sensor.

 

The second question  is how will your sensor work in my fluid, and these can range from: urine, blood, plasma, serum, saliva, breath, foods, beverages etc, a sub-question to this question is what will the drift be like. Again the answer to this questions is as above, and the way the sensor will respond to your sample depends on your sample and the degree of drift with time depends on the sensor, your sample and your system. In this note we do give a calibration routine that will allow you to compensate for drift and keep the overall system accurate.

 

Though this note is written with the ZP pH sensors specifically in mind the equations/similar equations  and calibration strategies are applicable to many of our other potentiometric sensors including: nitrate, ammonium, phosphate, sodium, potassium, chloride  and calcium.  At the same time similar equations and calibration routines are applicable to our amperometric sensors: glucose, oxygen, lactate and nitric oxide sensors.

 

 

As stated above this note is specifically focused on pH sensors, and the problem that we are trying to solve is drift in pH sensors which are expected to be in continuous use for hours/days.

 

We have illustrated the problem in the adjacent figure, where a pH sensor is in a constant pH solution at a constant temperature and the signal is stable/perfect. The reality is that the signal can/does drift. In this note we explain the maths behind the senors and where the source of drift could be coming from and then calibration routines to counter the drift.


In the adjacent image we have started with an equation based on the Nernst Equation, Equation 1, and rearranged it to Equation 3. If we look at Equation 2 it says that the raw signal will be constant when pH, temperature, constant 1 constant 2 and constant 3 are all stable. What Equation 3 indicates is that to remove the influence of temperature from the signal either the analysis should be done at a controlled temperature or the sample temperature should be monitored. 

 

The reality with pH sensors is that constant 1, constant 2 and constant 3 are not stable, and so if you have wondered why there is always/often bottles of pH calibration solutions next to the lab pH meter it is because of the drifts in these constants; in the rest of the note we discuss re-calibration techniques.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ONE POINT CALIBRATION

 

If it is only the Constant 1 in Equation 3 that is drifting then a one point calibration is sufficient. What we mean by this is that a solution of known pH is placed in contact with the sensor and the Constant can be calculated from Equation 4. The now re-calculated constant can be put back into Equation 3 and the accuracy of the system improves and the drift in the raw signal will not be reflected in the displayed pH.  In the adjacent image we show raw data from a ZP pH sensor, the steps in the data reflect the changes in signal as the pH is changed from pH 2 to 9 and back again. It should be noted that the sigan is stable over 1600 seconds/30 minutes. We would therefore suggest that the ZP sensors are at least stable over 30 minutes and shouldn't require calibration in that time. Please note a one point calibration is most effective when measuring a sample that should be at a specific pH, for example pH 7.2. In this case one uses a calibration solution that is similar to the sample solution and is also buffered at pH 7.2

 

 

TWO POINT CALIBRATION

 

A one point calibration described above is fine if we assume that the drifting is due to the Constant 1 in Equation 2, but is due to the pH Sensitivity drifting  then we need to perform a two point calibration. In the embedded excel file opposite we have embedded the maths to do a two point calibration. To make the spreadsheet work, then the user/system needs to expose the sensor to a calibration solution at pH 4 and record the mV signal (the default in the spreadsheet is 150 mV), next the user/system needs to expose to pH 10 (the default in the spreadsheet is pH -60), from that the spreadsheet calculates the Constant 1 and the pH Sensitivity. These values can be placed back into Equation 4 and the overall system will then calculate the pH more accurately. Typical values used to calibrate a pH sensor are 4 and 10 but the best way to get an accurate calibration is to use calibration solutions whose pH values are reflective of the expected pH range of the solution.

 

 

HARDWARE SETUP FOR RECALIBRATION

In the adjacent image we show an example of a hardware setup that can be used for one point and two point calibration.

TEMPERATURE COMPENSATION

The topic we have not yet discussed in this note is temperature compensation, please note that this page is a live page and ZP are busy gathering the temperature characteristics of the pH sensor.


Mon

15

Apr

2019

Two important developments on the ZP sodium sensors

At ZP we are aware that we have 'too many' biosensors, and as the demands of our clients increase and as many approach the market then we have moved to improve the sensors. In this note we discuss that the sodium sensors have been improved in two important ways:

 

1) CHLORIDE RESILIENT - We now have a sodium sensor that is chloride resilient, what we meant by this is that the reference electrode does not change it's voltage as the chloride concentration changes.  In many blood, plasma and serum applications the chloride concentration is fairly fixed at around 150 mM and so the fact that the silver/silver chloride reference electrode is chloride sensitive doesn't matter, but in other fluids this is not the case. In the new sensor the reference electrode is  chloride resilient and so suitable for applications where chloride is variable or unknown

 

 


2) LONGER TERM STABILITY - In the adjacent image ZP has run two of its chloride resilient sodium sensors in 40 mM sodium solution for 64 hours. Both sensors kept within a 40 mV wide band. This would mean that the sensor was showing a change that was equivalent to going from 40mM to approximately 160 mM. Both sensors were on the same solution but were in fact run on separate instruments. This would make one think that something extrinsic to the sensor and the solutions was causing the solutions/sensior to change its apparent sodium concentration; an obvious parameter would be temperature. One would conclude that if we repeated the experiment but with temperature control then the apparent stability would be improved.

 

As we suspected that our data had been influenced by temperature we repeated the test but in a lab with a much better temperature control. The result was that after the initial setting time the signal was more stable so provides evidence that the sensor is temperature sensitive and so oen will either monitor or control the temperature when in use


Mon

15

Apr

2019

ZP Norway Workshop on Biosensor Development and Commercialization

Who should come?

Anyone who is interested in developing and commercialising sensors based on electrochemistry.

What will happen?

This will be a highly interactive course/workshop, people will be encouraged to interrupt and ask question as we go along, you will do real practicals in our labs, so it WILL NOT all be theoretical.

Workshop content?

Please click the button below to get a flavour of the course.

 

Price?

The workshop will be  750 Euros and does not include accomodation.

 

Accommodation?

Please click the link here to see the hotel in walking distance - link.

 

Location

The workshop will be held at our ZP - Norway site in Horten.

Time and Date

The workshop will be held on the 4 September 2019 from 10 AM to 5:30 PM.


Wed

06

Mar

2019

pH monitoring in bioreactors and cell culture

At ZP we are super interested in many  types of biosensors including pH sensor. At ZP we appreciate that pH sensors have not changed in 40 years, so at ZP we are leading the revolution in updating and upgrading pH sensors both for discreet and continuous  monitoring.

 

The technology at ZP offers pH sensors at a few cents per sensors when purchased and used in volume.

 

 

In this note we describe the continuous monitoring of the pH levels of the media within a bioreactor, specifically we have used E. coli DH5α which has been  cultured in lysogeny broth (LB) for 24-48 hours. During this time the sensor was

recording the potential/pH of the solution by OCP. The sensor was tested for pH sensitivity using the standard pH4, pH7 and pH10 reference solutions at 10 minute intervals both before and after the microbiological test to firstly ensure that the sensor was pH sensitive before the test began, and secondly to assess what impact (if any) the exposure to the

bacterial solution had upon the sensors pH sensitive properties.


Wed

20

Feb

2019

Choosing inks for screen printed electrodes

INTRODUCTION

At Zimmer and Peacock we are pragmatists, which means we will choose the best materials for the particular application.  When manufacturing a screen printed electrode the choice of ink can be critical or not depending on what the ink will be used for.  When it comes to sensors and  assays developed on screen printed

 

In this note we discuss a comparison between two carbon inks from two different suppliers. When choosing an ink there are generally two categories of properties that are that .are considered and one that is overlooked, these are: printability, electrical properties and electrochemical properties.

 

The printability/rheological properties of an ink and paste are of course in the datasheet of the vendors, and similarly the electrical properties of the ink appear on the datasheets. What is not so much discussed is the electrochemical properties of the ink.  Whether the electrochemical properties are important then depends on what kind of assay is being run, whether is is an impedance, amperometric, voltammetric or potentiometric assay.  There are no definitive rules, but one could argue that electrochemical properties are important when the assay is voltammetric in nature. If the assay is potentiometric for example then the electrochemical properties are less important.  We illustrate this within this article.


We tested two inks from two vendors which were both described as carbon inks: INKS A and INKS B. We were able to print both inks, and when measuring the resistance both had similar conductivity.  

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WAFER MAPPING

Once the inks were printed ZP used its wafer mapping technology to assess electrodes fabricated from A and B.


ELECTROCHEMICAL TESTING

Both inks were tested for their electrochemical behavior, and whilst Ink B gave reasonable peaks, ink A did not give the expected electrochemical behavior.


FUNCTIONAL TESTING

Having determined that the electrodes were electrochemically different we could clearly say that for a voltammetric assay ink B performed better than ink A. We then tested both as amperometric and potentiometric sensors. Following these tests we could argue that both ink A and ink B were able to be used in the amperometric and potentiometric inks.


WHY ARE THE INKS DIFFERENT

In the adjacent image we show the route cause of while both inks are conductive one is better for voltammetric assays; the root cause is the ratio of organic binders to metal/metalloid on the surface. Higher the ratio of organic binder to metal/metalloid then the higher the resistance and therefore the more distorted the voltammetry .


Sun

10

Feb

2019

ZP Wearables Munich

ZP knows that one of the futures for the garment and sportswear industry are wearable biosensors. All the easy parameters such as ECG, pulse, temperature have been measure, BUT at ZP we are tackling the hard parameters, including: lactate, glucose, hydration, pH, sodium, potassium in a wearable format.

 

Our mission at ZP is to accelerate the time it takes get smart wearable biosensors to market.

 

ZP is a super friendly company so please don't hesitate to contact us.


Sun

10

Feb

2019

Manufacturer of Screen Printed Electrodes

OVERVIEW

At Zimmer and Peacock we carry our contract development and manufacturing of electrodes, sensors and biosensors. ZP is different in that we understand and can perform the entire workflow from: printing to functionalizing, to addition of microfluidics to final calibration of batches.

 

In this article we expand upon this and describe some ways of getting to market quicker.


MANUFACTURING ELECTRODES 

The issue with any custom manufacturing is that great manufacturing accuracy and precision comes with manufacturing volume, and in the same way low cost and high yield also comes with manufacturing volume. What we mean by this is  'the more you make something, the better you are at it'.

 

If we take the example of custom screen printed electrodes we receive a lot of requests for custom screen printed electrodes, but  when we look at the designs you discover that they are all fairly similar. At ZP we have both standard electrodes and we also provide custom manufacturing services.

 

The benefit of using a ZP standard product, particular our value electrode range, is that they are already a high volume manufacture piece has gone through the wafer mapping process. The advantage to our customers, clients and collaborators is that they can purchase just two electrodes to try out, or thousands of electrodes which have already been functionally tested.


FUNCTIONALIZING ELECTRODES

Zimmer and Peacock is unusual in that we can both manufacture electrodes but we can also functionalize the  electrodes to make them specific; the materials we are used to handling include: aptamers, ionophores, enzymes, DNA antibodies, antigens etc. Zimmer and Peacock has a number or pre-existing sensors and biosensors which can accelerate the time to get to market.


TESTING

At Zimmer and Peacock we are often asked to do custom/contract manufacturing of screen printed electrodes.  At Zimmer and Peacock we take a more holistic approach to the screen printing of electrodes for sensor and biosensor applications.

 

Electrodes on the R and D market are often shipped functionally untested, what this means is that the electrodes are visually inspected but appearance is not a god assessment on how an electrode will function as  a biosensor. ZP is different in that we are able to electrochemically functionally test electrodes and sensors before shipping; at ZP we call this process wafer mapping.

CALIBRATION

ZP can also functionally test electrodes/sensors and so assign calibration factors to the electrodes/sensors so that the performance of the sensor in the hands of the final user is the most precise and accurate it can be.

the calibration factors can be transmitted using technologies such as RFID or QR codes.


MICROFLUIDICS

Self filling/capillary filling is a feature common on glucose electrochemical sensors/strips; at ZP are able to provide this technology either as a custom part or as a standard product; again the use of the standard product reduces tiem and the cost to our collaborators.


If you have any questions regarding ZP please don't hesitate to contact us.

Sat

09

Feb

2019

ZP @ Lab-on-a-Chip 2019 San Diego

ZP will be exhibiting at Lab-on-a-Chip 2019 at San Diego come and see us there.


Sat

09

Feb

2019

ZP @ 71 st AACC 2019 Anaheim CA

ZP will be exhibiting at the AACC in Anaheim, please come and see us there at both 1299.


Sat

09

Feb

2019

ZP @ Sensors 2019 San Jose

ZP will be exhibiting at Sensors 2019 in San Jose, please come and see us there.


Sat

09

Feb

2019

ZP will be at MDDI in Boston 2019

ZP will be exhibiting at MDDI Boston.


Sat

09

Feb

2019

ZP @IFT19 New Orleans

Come and meet ZP at the IFT in New Orleans, we will be exhibiting.


Sat

09

Feb

2019

ZP at ASTA Naples Florida

Zimmer and Peacock will be attending the ASTA conference in Naples Florida, come and see us there.


Sat

09

Feb

2019

Meet ZP at Tri-Con San Francisco in March

Zimmer and Peacock will be exhibiting for the third time in a row at Tri-Con this year. Please come and meet us there.

 

Fri

04

Jan

2019

Newsletter January 4th

Welcome to this week's newsletter from Zimmer and Peacock. This newsletter is a mixture of news, stories and tech notes from Zimmer and Peacock. If you want to subscribe to our newsletter or have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock and our passion for biosensor technologies please don't hesitate to contact us.

ZP – Bio-sensing Technology Malaysia

 

Zimmer and Peacock is exhibiting at Bio-Sensing Technology in Kuala Lumpa Malaysia 2019.

 

About the conference – 

Bio-sensing technologies are of growing importance in healthcare, agri-food, environmental and security sectors, and this is reflected in the continued growth of global markets for such technologies. Connectivity with the wider-world through the internet and the demand for data to drive big-data applications are other important drivers of bios-sensing technology development. This conference will provide a forum for accessing the most up-to-date and authoritative knowledge from both commercial and academic worlds, sharing best practice in the field as well as learning about case studies of successfully integrated bio-sensing technologies.

 

This year the conference will have one theme dedicated to bio-sensing technology for the internet-of-things and a post conference meeting with a particular focus on applications addressing challenges in telehealth and diagnostic. 

ZP launches new website for 2019.

 

Zimmer and Peacock has undergone substantial growth in 2018 and in preparation for further growth in 2019 we have launched our new website.

Using field data to refine and finish your sensor biosensor and medical diagnostic

 

ZP is a world leading contract developer of sensors, biosensors and IVDs. In this note we discuss a strategy ZP can use on your programs to accelerate the time it takes to get to to market. The strategy discussed on our website here works in a number of businesses and technical scenarios, including where the strategy is to perform a 510 K submission.

How to characterise a continuous glucose measuring sensor

 

At Zimmer and Peacock we have a number of biosensors suitable or adaptable for continuous monitoring, including: continuous glucose monitoring (CGM), continuous lactate monitoring (CLM), potassium monitoring, sodium monitoring, sweat monitoring and hydration monitoring. 

 

In these notes on our website we start a discussion on how ZP characterises such sensors, we specifically use the example of glucose, though the technique can be extended to other analytes.

Sun

30

Dec

2018

Using field data to refine/finish your sensor. biosensor and medical diagnostic

ZP is a world leading contract developer of sensors, biosensors and IVDs. In this note we discuss a strategy ZP can use on your programs to accelerate the time it takes to get to to market.. The strategy discussed  works in a number of businesses and technical  scenarios, including where the strategy is to perform a 510 K submission.

 

The traditional way of developing a sensor, biosensor or IVD is to spend several years developing the sensors and then going into the field and/or clinical setting and starting testing on real samples. This is a sequential effort and means  that too much time is spent tuning the assay on samples that are not representative of the the real world samples. In addition the methods used to extract the signal from the raw data are often highly manual with many teams recycling techniques used in the past. For example glucose signals are often measured by using chronoamperometry and chronocoulometry, but this ignores the plethora of other techniques available to the development team.  Further with the slow traditional strategy it ignore the simple fact that investors give a company a higher valuation if it has data on real samples; therefore at ZP we think it is important to get to real sample data ASAP, and rather than sequentially building the sensor technology and then gathering real world data, the two efforts should be in parallel and/or overlapping.

 

At ZP we rapidly move you to real world samples, using a three phase approach.  The advantage that the signal extraction algorithm is tuned on real sampes, whilst also gather real world sample data, the phases are::

 

1) PHASE ONE - ZP develops your proof-of-principle assay on our pre-existing electrodes and our AnaPot electronics; upon completion of a proof-of-principle study we can translate the results onto a some hundreds/thousands of functionalized electrodes and start testing with real samples.

 

2) PHASE TWO - ZP and you perform some initial test with real samples to ensure that the new diagnostic/sensor is approximately working.

 

3) PHASE THREE - This is a preclinical study on some hundreds of real samples. This PHASE THREE involves two parts:

  • 3A - TRAINING PHASE
  • 3B - TESTING PHASE

For this strategy to work we do need three pieces in place, these are: 

 

ONE - There is an existing 'gold standard'/predicative device or assay available. 

 

TWO - Ideally ZP should have developed or supplied your initial sensors and  electronics; the reasons why this is important is that we will programme the electronics to analyse the sample with several electrochemical waveforms. The strategy is based on the fact that there are multiple ways of extracting an electrochemical signal for an analyte,  and so to maximise the effectiveness of the Training Phase we will over analyse the sample with multiple techniques and gather all the data. The more data we gather than the higher the probability of success when we mine the data for the analyte signal later.

 

 

THREE - We will require authentic real world samples , be it urine, blood, red wine etc. The samples should  cover a range of analyte concentrations, with the analyte of interest being present in the samples from a  low concentration through to a high concentrations.

3A - TRAINING PHASE

 

As discussed above ZP collects data on hundreds of real world samples using both the new technology and the predicative technology, subsequently we split the data randomly into a training data set and a test data set.

 

With the training set of data we use the ZP Signal Extraction Loop Training Phase Strategy for developing the calibration/extraction algorithm for your device.The output from the training phase is an algorithm to extract the analyte signal from the raw data.

OPTIMIZING THE SIGNAL EXTRACTION ALGORITHM

As discussed above the technology provided by ZP will over analyse the samples so that we can extensively mine the raw data. The strategy is to develop a signal extraction algorithm which leads to a  minimum error between the new diagnostic and the existing/predictive diagnostic.

 

The ZP signal extraction algorithm will automatically loop/iterate until the error betwen the existing/predicative device and the new device is minimised, see adjacent figure.


3B - TESTING PHASE

 

 As discussed above, he data for the testing phase was in fact collected during the training phase, but now the signal extraction algorithm developed in the training phase is used to extract the signal form the test data set, and a Deming regression analysis performed to ensure equivalence between the predicative assay and the new assay.

 

If you have any questions regarding how ZP can help in the development and manufacturing of your sensor, biosensor IVD, please don't hesitate to contact us.


Sun

30

Dec

2018

How to characterise a continuous glucose measuring sensor

At Zimmer and Peacock we have a number of biosensors suitable or adaptable for continuous monitoring, including: continuous glucose monitoring (CGM), continuous lactate monitoring (CLM), potassium monitoring, sodium monitoring, sweat monitoring and hydration monitoring. 

 

In the notes below we start a discussion on how ZP characterises such sensors, we specifically use the example of glucose, though the technique can be extended to other analytes.

RAW DATA

In the adjacent image a ZP CGM sensor is tested over a range of glucose concentrations.

 

In this example of raw data from a CGM we can we how the current increases with glucose concentration.

 


CONVERTING RAW DATA TO INFORMATION

Our raw data from the image above can be converted into information in the first instance by plotting signal versus concentration; we have illustrated this in the adjacent figure;  we have analysed the signal at each glucose concentration and made a calibration curve with a linear fit.

c0 = base line

c1 = gradient/sensitivity.

 


SENSOR DRIFT

The question with any sensor that is to be used for continuous monitoring is 'how much does the sensor drift?'

 

In the adjacent image a sensors was tested over several days and the raw signal is plotted against the glucose solution used to test the CGM.

 

In this theoretical example the sensors has lost approximately 35 % over the test time; there are two potential solutions in this scenario:

 

ONE - Reformulate the sensor so it is stable.

TWO - Have a periodic calibration routine with a known concentration in a  calibration solution and adjust the sensors calibration factors.


CONVERTING RAW SIGNAL TO INFORMATION

 

In the sensor drift data above for a theoretical CGM sensor there are two parameters, that  can drift with time, the baseline and the sensitivity, the volume of raw data can be reduced to two parameters which can quantify the overall sensors drift by calculating the baseline drift and sensitivity drift.


Zimmer and Peacock are  world leading contract developer and manufacturer of sensor, biosensors with a wide range of application experience including continuous glucose monitoring (CGM), if you have any questions please don't hesitate to contact us.


Sat

29

Dec

2018

RFID Tags and Biosensors - Manufacturing sensors

It can take millions of dollars of money and effort to lock-down the manufacturing of biosensors and medical diagnostics. Therefore, you must have some out of the box thinking to be able to get your initial biosensor product ready for market and on the shelves. 

At ZP we work to make the biosensors and manufacturing as good as they can be, but we also use supporting technology like RFID tags to carry important data about the sensors into the field. RFID tag technology allows the manufacture test data to be carried with the sensor out into the final application, the result is an overall sensor performance that is superior to just the manufactured sensor product.

At ZP we perform a lot of testing and characterization during the manufacturing process and this data can influence the sensitivity and performance of the final product.

ZP is the only contract biosensors and medical diagnostic company able to send deliver biosensors with individual calibration factors for maximum infield performance.


Fri

28

Dec

2018

Newsletter December 28

Welcome to this week's newsletter from Zimmer and Peacock. This newsletter is a mixture of news, stories and tech notes from Zimmer and Peacock. If you want to subscribe to our newsletter or have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock and our passion for biosensor technologies please don't hesitate to contact us.

ZP - Sponsers BioEl 2019

 

Zimmer and Peacock is a world leading contract biosensor and medical diagnostics company, and so we are delighted to sponsor the 6th International Winterschool on Bioelectronics.

 

 

About the workshop.

The integration of electronics with the biological world can be achieved by platforms using bio-inspired materials as well as strategies. Such bio-compatible electronics have the potential to transform current paradigms in green information technology and biomedical research. Realization of biodegradable or biocompatible, low-cost, large-volume materials and devices will contribute to sustainability in plastic "consumable" electronics. Biomaterials-based electronics with biomimetic interfaces can be utilized in medical technologies that require accurate sensing and stimulation of biological matter. 

This will be a forum to bring together both veteran and young researchers to learn and discuss emerging topics in the field of bioelectronics. Topics include: 

 

•    Electronic/ionic signal transduction

•    Conducting polymers in biochemistry and biomedicine

•    Electronics based on biomaterials

•    Optoelectronics at the interface with biology

•    Electroceuticals

•    Devices for electronic sensing of bioanalytes, and electronically-mediated drug delivery

•    Iontronics, protonics

•    Electronic interfaces with biochemistry

•    Artificial skin

•    Artificial retina

•    Consideration of conduction in biomaterials, i.e. melanin, DNA, etc.

•    Nature-inspired materials for energy harvesting applications

•    Implantable electronics

•    Nanoinjection, structured material interfaces with cells

•    Biocompatible inorganic semiconductors and devices

•    Neural Interface

•    Clinical applications

•    Plant electronics / bionics

•    Tissue Engineering

 

ZP - Christmas Party 2018

 

Zimmer and Peacock has had a record breaking 2018 and the team is really looking forward to 2019.

 

Please don't hesitate to contact us with all your biosensors and medical diagnostic development and manufacturing needs.

Fri

21

Dec

2018

ZP - Sponsers BioEl 2019

Zimmer and Peacock is a world leading contract biosensor and medical diagnostics company, and so we are delighted to sponsor the 6th International Winterschool on Bioelectronics.

About the workshop.

The integration of electronics with the biological world can be achieved by platforms using bio-inspired materials as well as strategies. Such bio-compatible electronics have the potential to transform current paradigms in green information technology and biomedical research. Realization of biodegradable or biocompatible, low-cost, large-volume materials and devices will contribute to sustainability in plastic "consumable" electronics. Biomaterials-based electronics with biomimetic interfaces can be utilized in medical technologies that require accurate sensing and stimulation of biological matter. 

This will be a forum to bring together both veteran and young researchers to learn and discuss emerging topics in the field of bioelectronics. Topics include: 

 

•    Electronic/ionic signal transduction

•    Conducting polymers in biochemistry and biomedicine

•    Electronics based on biomaterials

•    Optoelectronics at the interface with biology

•    Electroceuticals

•    Devices for electronic sensing of bioanalytes, and electronically-mediated drug delivery

•    Iontronics, protonics

•    Electronic interfaces with biochemistry

•    Artificial skin

•    Artificial retina

•    Consideration of conduction in biomaterials, i.e. melanin, DNA, etc.

•    Nature-inspired materials for energy harvesting applications

•    Implantable electronics

•    Nanoinjection, structured material interfaces with cells

•    Biocompatible inorganic semiconductors and devices

•    Neural Interface

•    Clinical applications

•    Plant electronics / bionics

•    Tissue Engineering

Fri

21

Dec

2018

ZP - Christmas Party 2018

Zimmer and Peacock has had a record breaking 2018, and so the team is really looking forward to 2019.

 

Please don't hesitate to contact us with all your biosensors and medical diagnostic development and manufacturing needs.


Fri

21

Dec

2018

Newsletter December 21

Welcome to this week's newsletter from Zimmer and Peacock. This newsletter is a mixture of news, stories and tech notes from Zimmer and Peacock. If you want to subscribe to our newsletter or have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock and our passion for biosensor technologies please don't hesitate to contact us.

There's more than one way to measure pH

 

What's wrong with some of the methods of measuring pH? At ZP we recently discovered the answer to this question whilst working on a novel application, and the answer is that potentiometric measurements using oxide based sensors can take some time to reach equilibrium, When we say 'some time' we specifically mean 200 seconds, which may not sound like a lot, but if you want or need to know the pH of a sample within 30 seconds then 200 seconds is too long.

 

At ZP we have a different attitude to problems, as we seem them as opportunities and so when faced with a challenge of needing a fast to respond pH sensor, we changed the mode of operation and the chemistry of detection; what we created was a ZP voltammetric pH sensor which was able to measure pH within 30 seconds.

Electrochemistry - The perfect bridge between chemistry/biology and engineering

 

Scientists in the lab, be it biologists and chemists, love to measure their molecules and assays by optical spectroscopy method, be it: UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy, infrared, surface plasmon resonance, fluorescence etc.

 

The fundamental issue with these lab techniques is that don't always translate when you need to make real world sensors and assays, especially where parameters such as low cost, quantification etc come into play. 

 

If we take a lesson from history we should consider the home glucose test used by diabetics.  When these products first came to market they were optical assays, but were quickly  replaced by electrochemical assays. 

 

Why were the first glucose home use meters optical? The answer is because the scientists and engineers developing them were used to optical assays, and so they of course they went  with what they knew.  The issue is that an optically based assay often requires a sample with a high transparency; but high transparency is an immediate issue when you are trying to analyse real-world  samples such as whole blood. When people discovered that they could get a glucose signal in whole blood using screen printed electronics/electrodes the market very quickly moved over to electrochemistry. This move from optical assays to electrochemistry by the glucose detection market was not because the scientists and engineers loved electrochemistry, but it was because it offered a much lower cost detection strategy with a lot less sample workup.

 

Find out more on our website here

ZP - exhibiting ECEE 2019

 

ZP is delighted to be exhibiting alongside Zahner at ECEE in glasgow.

 

The Electrochemical Conference on Energy and the Environment (ECEE 2019): Bioelectrochemistry and Energy Storage will be held in Glasgow, Scotland from July 21-26, 2019 at the Scottish Events Campus (SEC). This international meeting will focus on the following areas:

 

Lithium-ion Batteries: From the Design of New Electrode Materials and Electrolytes to the Performance and Recycling of Industrial Systems

In Situ and Operando Characterization of Energy Storage Systems

Mass and Charge Transfer Across Electrochemical Interfaces

From Qualitative Models to Quantitative Predictions

Alternative Battery Chemistries and High-power Devices

Metal Anodes Meet Solid Electrolytes

Enzymatic Bioelectrochemistry

Microbial Bioelectrochemistry

Bio-inspired Electrocatalysis

ZP - South Africa

 

Zimmer and Peacock is located in the USA, Norway and the United Kingdom, but our perspective is global and so this week we were in South Africa delivering our biosensor, sensor and medical diagnostic technologies to partners there.

ZP - Testing the pungency of garlic

 

Zimmer and Peacock have been busy going on site and testing garlic products with our garlic sensors.

Thu

20

Dec

2018

There's more than one way to measure pH

What's wrong with some of the methods of measuring pH? At ZP we recently discovered the answer to this question whilst working on a novel application, and the answer is that potentiometric measurements using oxide based sensors can take some time to reach equilibrium, When we say 'some time' we specifically mean 200 seconds, which may not sound like a lot, but if you want or need to know the pH of a sample within 30 seconds then 200 seconds is too long.

 

At ZP we have a different attitude to problems, as we seem them as opportunities and so when faced with a challenge of needing a fast to respond pH sensor, we changed the mode of operation and the chemistry of detection; what we created was a ZP voltammetric pH sensor which was able to measure pH within 30 seconds.


Thu

20

Dec

2018

Electrochemistry - The perfect bridge between chemistry/biology and engineering

Scientists in the lab, be it biologists and chemists, love to measure their molecules and assays by optical spectroscopy method, be it: UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy, infrared, surface plasmon resonance, fluorescence etc.

 

The fundamental issue with these lab techniques is that don't always translate when you need to make real world sensors and assays, especially where parameters such as low cost, quantification etc come into play. 

 

If we take a lesson from history we should consider the home glucose test used by diabetics.  When these products first came to market they were optical assays, but were quickly  replaced by electrochemical assays. 

 

Why were the first glucose home use meters optical? The answer is because the scientists and engineers developing them were used to optical assays, and so they of course they went  with what they knew.  The issue is that an optically based assay often requires a sample with a high transparency; but high transparency is an immediate issue when you are trying to analyse real-world  samples such as whole blood. When people discovered that they could get a glucose signal in whole blood using screen printed electronics/electrodes the market very quickly moved over to electrochemistry. This move from optical assays to electrochemistry by the glucose detection market was not because the scientists and engineers loved electrochemistry, but it was because it offered a much lower cost detection strategy with a lot less sample workup.

What is not widely appreciated is if you can record a spectrum such as a UV-VIS spectrum then you are almost guaranteed to be able to obtain an equivalent electrochemical voltammetry spectrum. For example if you have a molecule of interest and you can measure the UV-VIS spectrum, then you can record the equivalent electrochemical spectrum, this is shown in the adjacent image.


The existence of an electrochemical spectrum for every optical spectrum, in ZP's experience, is universally true, we show another example in the adjacent image.


If developing low cost real-world solutions at the right price  is important to you then, there is a fundamental/quantum reason when electrochemistry 'beats' optical techniques and it comes down to whether it is easier to measure an electron or a photon. An electron has mass and charge, whilst a photon has no mass and no charge. Any electronics engineer can measure electrons, it is called electrical current, but it takes more effort to measure something with no mass or charge, such as a photon. This quantum difference between a photon and an electron means that the electronics needed to measure an optical system are more expensive than the electron system.

 

As discussed an optical system often requires transparent clean sample, free from chunks and lumps, but also an optical system also requires shielding from the ambient light. We are surrounded by light and so special measures have to be taken to shield the sample from the light. If we return to the example of the glucose strip for diabetes, there is no shielding of the assay in place, and this is because electrochemistry doesn't 'care about' light. This reduces the cost of electrochemical products as the engineers don't have to design special shielding for the assay.

Zimmer and Peacock is a unique company in that we have a full range of analytical techniques from UV-Vis spectrometers, UV-VIS-HPLC, plate readers, potentiostats etc, and so we are very used to developing and validating assays using the spectrum of analytical techniques.  If you have any questions regarding this article please don't hesitate to contact us.

 

 

Mon

17

Dec

2018

ZP - exhibiting ECEE 2019

ZP is delighted to be exhibiting alongside Zahner at ECEE in glasgow.

 

The Electrochemical Conference on Energy and the Environment (ECEE 2019): Bioelectrochemistry and Energy Storage will be held in Glasgow, Scotland from July 21-26, 2019 at the Scottish Events Campus (SEC). This international meeting will focus on the following areas:

 

  • Lithium-ion Batteries: From the Design of New Electrode Materials and Electrolytes to the Performance and Recycling of Industrial Systems
  • In Situ and Operando Characterization of Energy Storage Systems
  • Mass and Charge Transfer Across Electrochemical Interfaces
  • From Qualitative Models to Quantitative Predictions
  • Alternative Battery Chemistries and High-power Devices
  • Metal Anodes Meet Solid Electrolytes
  • Enzymatic Bioelectrochemistry
  • Microbial Bioelectrochemistry
  • Bio-inspired Electrocatalysis

 


Mon

17

Dec

2018

ZP - South Africa

Zimmer and Peacock is located in the USA, Norway and the United Kingdom, but our perspective is global and so this week we were in South Africa delivering our biosensor, sensor and medical diagnostic technologies to partners there.


Mon

17

Dec

2018

ZP - Testing the pungency of garlic

Zimmer and Peacock have been busy going on site and testing garlic products with our garlic sensors.


Fri

14

Dec

2018

Newsletter December 14

Welcome to this week's newsletter from Zimmer and Peacock. This newsletter is a mixture of news, stories and tech notes from Zimmer and Peacock. If you want to subscribe to our newsletter or have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock and our passion for biosensor technologies please don't hesitate to contact us.

Chilli Sauces tested in production on ZP Chilli Sensors

 

ZP is delighted that many of our clients are now using the ZP ChilliPot to test their products as part of the QC in production.

ZP - fixing problems with sensors and biosensors

 

THE PROBLEM

At Zimmer and Peacock we develop electrochemical sensors, biosensors and medical diagnostics;  something that is rarely mentioned both in the academic or industrial setting is the reference electrode. Often the reference electrode is silver/silver chloride, but the term not often used but which should be accurately applied is pseudo reference electrode.

 

What this means is that the reference electrode is only a reference electrode under certain conditions  of stable chloride concentration.  In many applications chloride can be considered to be stable and repeatable, for example the chloride concentration in blood, plasma, serum, interstitial fluid etc the chloride concentration is around 135 to 150 mM. In other applications such as urine analysis, water testing, food testing etc, the chloride concentration maybe unknown and maybe a variable. The issue  is that a silver/silver chloride reference electrode has a potential that is effected by the sample's chloride concentration,  this is shown in the image below.

 

The effect of having a pseudo reference electrode is that sensors based on amperometry potentiometry, voltammetry, etc many not function as expected if the chloride concentration is unknown and variable. Read our solution on our website here

How to collect sweat for on skin analysis?

 

Zimmer and Peacock has the world's only off-the-shelf platform for analysing sweat, be it glucose, lactate, sodium, oxygen, chloride or pH. In the adjacent video we show you a configuration for collecting sweat and moving the sweat over a sensor.

ZP BioMed Devices 2018 San Jose

 

Thank you for talking to us at BioMed Devices San Jose 2018.

 

At the conference we spoke about sensors for potassium, sodium, pH, glucose, lactate, oxygen, etc.

 

We talked about wearable sensors and detecting analytes in urine, plasma, sweat and blood.

 

If you have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock please don't hesitate to contact us.

Mon

10

Dec

2018

Chilli Sauces tested in production on ZP Chilli Sensors

ZP is delighted that many of our clients are now using the ZP ChilliPot to test their products as part of the QC in production.


Sun

09

Dec

2018

ZP - fixing problems with sensors and biosensors

THE PROBLEM

At Zimmer and Peacock we develop electrochemical sensors, biosensors and medical diagnostics;  something that is rarely mentioned both in the academic or industrial setting is the reference electrode. Often the reference electrode is silver/silver chloride, but the term not often used but which should be accurately applied is pseudo reference electrode.

 

What this means is that the reference electrode is only a reference electrode under certain conditions  of stable chloride concentration.  In many applications chloride can be considered to be stable and repeatable, for example the chloride concentration in blood, plasma, serum, interstitial fluid etc the chloride concentration is around 135 to 150 mM. In other applications such as urine analysis, water testing, food testing etc, the chloride concentration maybe unknown and maybe a variable. The issue  is that a silver/silver chloride reference electrode has a potential that is effected by the sample's chloride concentration,  this is shown in the adjacent image.

 

The effect of having a pseudo reference electrode is that sensors based on amperometry potentiometry, voltammetry, etc many not function as expected if the chloride concentration is unknown and variable.


THE SOLUTION

ZP has developed a reference electrode that it can apply to its standard products that is insensitive to changes in chloride concentration, please see adjacent image.


Sat

08

Dec

2018

How to collect sweat for on skin analysis?

Zimmer and Peacock has the world's only off-the-shelf platform for analysing sweat, be it glucose, lactate, sodium, oxygen, chloride or pH. In the adjacent video we show you a configuration for collecting sweat and moving the sweat over a sensor.


Sat

08

Dec

2018

ZP BioMed Devices 2018 San Jose

Thank you for talking to us at BioMed Devices San Jose 2018.

 

At the conference we spoke about sensors for potassium, sodium, pH, glucose, lactate, oxygen, etc.

 

We talked about wearable sensors and detecting analytes in urine, plasma, sweat and blood.

 

 

If you have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock please don't hesitate to contact us.


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Fri

07

Dec

2018

Newsletter December 7

Welcome to this week's newsletter from Zimmer and Peacock. This newsletter is a mixture of news, stories and tech notes from Zimmer and Peacock. If you want to subscribe to our newsletter or have any questions regarding Zimmer and Peacock and our passion for biosensor technologies please don't hesitate to contact us.

ZP develops chloride sensor

 

At Zimmer we believe that ion sensors including sodium, potassium and pH are important sensors which is why we are delighted to expand our range with a chloride sensor.

Anatomy of a ZP Sensor

 

This picture is the front side and back side of a ZP sensor, when using these sensors it is important that the connector you use does not cause a short between the front side and backside. If you are planning to use these sensors in a potentiometric mode you of course need to make electrical connection with the working/sense electrode, you can then choose to use the reference or counter electrodes as your reference or short the counter and reference together and have them combined as the reference electrode.

Questions about Zahner

 

At Zimmer and Peacock we are here to help our clients and customers. This week we had an enquiry about the EIS and potentiostats of Zahner that ZP distributes in the Nordics and UK.

 

In the short post below we have answered some of the recent questions we received. 

 

1. The Zahner system can be controlled by windows7/8/10-PC, though the Win10 machine is not supplied';this means that if you have a Win10 machine you can run the software.

 

2. Some of the Zahner potentiostats are advertised as having Controlled voltage: ±15 V / ±5 V, what this means is that you can choose to operate the instrument  at ±15 V or ±5 V; you will use the ±5 V voltage often in  applications like the Gratzel cell etc, whilst you will use the ±15 V setting in power applications like batteries and fuel cells. Switching between ±15 V or ±5 V is an option in the software.

 

3.What is the difference between the compliance voltage and the controlled voltage? Often in an electrochemical cell we will have the working electrode, the counter electrode and the reference electrode. The electrochemist is often interested in controlling the voltage at the working electrode (called controlled voltage), but what we as electrochemists sometimes over look is that the potentiostat then applies another voltage to the cell at the counter electrode called the compliance voltage. The reason that the potentiostat applies this compliance voltage at the counter electrode is because the rate of reaction at the counter electrode needs to be as fast as the rate of reaction/current at the working electrode. So in summary the controlled voltage is what we apply at working electrode, whilst the compliance voltage is what the potentiostat applies to the counter electrode to ensure the rate of reaction at the working electrode is as fast as it need to be.

 

4. Zahner instruments come with extra slots for additional hardware modules, these slots can be used for additonal cards like the TEMP/U and the PAD4. For example the TEMP/U allows for the measurement of parameters such as pH, temperature etc within the electrochemical cell, whilst teh PAD4 is often used to measure 4 electrochemical cells that are in a battery or fuel cell stack.

 

5.The PAD4 is useful in applications where you have for example a series of electrochemical cells stacked together to form a battery. The Zahner potentiostat would allow you to measure the impedance across the entire battery, but if you want to know how individual cells within the batter are performing you can use the PAD4 to measure up to 4 cells within the stack, of course the more PAD4 cards you use the more cells within a stack you can measure.

 

6 The PP211 is often supplied with Zahner CIMPS systems, this is because the Zahner CIMPS system has a light source and the P211 is the 'power supply  to that light source.

ZP patrocina Congreso Colombiabo de Electroquimic

 

ZP se presenta como uno de los patrocinadores del Congreso Columbiano de Electroquímica.

 

ZP es uno de los líderes mundiales en tecnología para electroquímicos: electrodos impresos, potenciostatos, etc.

 

Por favor no dude en contactar con nosotros para más detalle

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